Direct view Micro LED displays are a relatively new display technology that so far has been publicly demonstrated only by Samsung and Sony, the two of which tend to experiment with variety of technologies in general. At IFA last week TCL, a major maker of televisions, threw its hat into the ring by demonstrating its ultra-large Micro LED-based Ultra-HD TV.

Dubbed the Cinema Wall 132-Inch 4K, TCL’s Micro LED television uses 24,000,000 individually controlled LEDs as RGB subpixels, and features a 1,500 nits max brightness level as well as a 2,500,000 contrast ratio (good enough to compete against OLEDs). The manufacturer claims that the TV can display a wide color gamut, but does not disclose whether they're using DCI-P3 or BT.2020.

Like other early-generation display products, TCL is not revealing if and when plans to release its 132-inch 4K Micro LED TV commercially, but the fact that that it has a device that is good enough to be shown in public (see the video by Quantum OLED channel here) is an important step. Just like other makers of Micro LED televisions, TCL might want to increase peak brightness supported by these devices, as many modern titles are post-produced using Dolby’s Pulsar reference monitor for Dolby Vision HDR, which has a peak brightness level of 4000 nits.

Numerous TV makers are currently investigating Micro LED technology as a viable alternative to OLED-based screens. While OLEDs tend to offer superior contrast ratio when compared to LCDs, they have a number of trade-offs, including off-axis color shifting, ghosting, burn-in, etc. WOLED has mitigated some of these issues, but it has also introduced others due to the inherient limitations of using color filters.

By contrast Micro LED TVs are expected to be free of such drawbacks, while still retaining the advantages of individual LEDs like brightness, contrast, fast response time, and wide viewing angles. As an added bonus, Micro LED TVs will not need any bezels and can be made very thin.

Related Reading:

Sources: Quantum OLED, MicroLED.info, LEDs Inside

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  • defaultluser - Friday, September 13, 2019 - link

    Theyt's slightly higher DPI than Samsung's The Wall, so slow progress is being made.

    In another decade, you might be able to buy this in 75 inches! Of course by then, OLED will be packing 8k into the same size.
    Reply
  • s.yu - Saturday, September 14, 2019 - link

    Currently you have 4K in a smartphone, you don't need 75" for 8k, however that's Pentile...come to think of it nobody said this MicroLED is RGB stripe! Reply
  • techguymaxc - Friday, September 13, 2019 - link

    "While OLEDs tend to offer superior contrast ratio when compared to LCDs, they have a number of trade-offs, including off-axis color shifting"

    You have this backwards. Off-axis color shifting is a downside of LCD panels. OLEDs absolutely do not suffer from this problem.
    Reply
  • dullard - Friday, September 13, 2019 - link

    Sort by color shift: OLEDs are in the middle of the pack. So, yes, they do suffer from color shift.
    https://www.rtings.com/tv/tools/table/7777
    Reply
  • s.yu - Saturday, September 14, 2019 - link

    All OLED TVs are WOLED, this issue comes with the color filter not the backlight, so yeah "While OLEDs tend to offer superior contrast ratio when compared to LCDs, they have a number of trade-offs, including off-axis color shifting, ghosting, burn-in, etc. WOLED has mitigated some of these issues, but it has also introduced others due to the inherient limitations of using color filters." is incorrect, off-axis color shifting is what WOLED introduces, not mitigates. Reply
  • Bazzie - Saturday, September 14, 2019 - link

    You have to look at the Rtings charts to see the full picture. Rtings rates color shift when hue deviates by 3%. LG C8 hits this point at 28 degrees (which is barely perceptible). Even at 70 degrees the color shift barely hits 10%. The contrast loss (where OLED is king) is much more bothersome to most people. Reply
  • Bazzie - Saturday, September 14, 2019 - link

    I have an LG C7 and there is a very slight color shift when moving away from straight on viewing. It is insignificant compared to LCD panels and you really have to look for it. The contrast level remains more or less constant which is much more apparent compared to washed out LCD TV's. Even IPS panels fare poorly when compared to OLED's. Reply
  • eastcoast_pete - Friday, September 13, 2019 - link

    The main (only?) customers for these are, at this time, people with way too much money on hand, and people editing 8K video. If it covers the entire color space for 8K, it would be great for editing. Reply
  • nandnandnand - Friday, September 13, 2019 - link

    You want to use a 4K TV to edit 8K video? Reply
  • mode_13h - Friday, September 13, 2019 - link

    Well, if you're specifically concerned just about editing, then people have long edited at a lower resolution, just because it's easier to work with. Then, once the edit list is finalized, apply it to the full-res footage. Reply

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