Corsair’s Elgato has introduced its new capture card aimed at professional gamers and streamers who need to record either HDR10 or 240 Hz content. Dubbed the 4K60 Pro MK.2, at the moment it is the only consumer-grade capture card capable of capturing HDR10 content.

The Elgato 4K60 Pro MK.2 is half the size of its predecessor, yet its capabilities have been vastly improved thanks to new hardware and software. The card enables streamers to capture videos a 4K at 60 Hz resolution with HDR10 while simultaneously streaming to Twitch in 1080p at 60 Hz. Furthermore, it also can it can capture 1080p at 240 Hz as well as 1440p at 144 Hz videos in dual-PC setups. The maximum encoding bitrate supported by the 4K60 Pro MK.2 card is 140 Mbps, which is higher than that supported by Ultra-HD Blu-ray discs.

Right now, the Elgato 4K60 Pro MK.2 is the only consumer-oriented capture card to support 4Kp60 with HDR10, so the board will likely get popular among PC and console gamers/streamers who play titles supporting this HDR transport.

The Elgato 4K60 Pro MK.2 card is available directly from Corsair/Elgato as well as various retailers worldwide. In the U.S., the board carries a $249.99 price tag.

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Source: Corsair/Elgato

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  • Death666Angel - Wednesday, August 21, 2019 - link

    HDMI 2.0 is enough for 4k@60, so a quarter the resolution at quadruple the refresh rate is exactly in line with it's capabilities. 1440p@144 is marginally more bandwidth intensive (7%) but still fits inside the 14.4 Gbps bandwidth of HDMI 2.0 when doing 8 bit. :) At 10 bit it would be slightly out of spec but still might work. Reply
  • Diji1 - Wednesday, August 21, 2019 - link

    >at the moment it is the only consumer-grade capture card capable of capturing HDR10 content.

    Do you guys even do the smallest of checks on the marketing waffle you're repeating here?

    The Avermedia GC573 has been out for ages and it does everything this card does including HDR 10 capture as far as I can see ... and it's 100 bucks less than the previous Elgato flagship 4K60 let this overpriced thing.

    https://www.avermedia.com/us/product-detail/GC573
    Reply
  • Death666Angel - Wednesday, August 21, 2019 - link

    You have very different pricing compared to me in Germany. The GC573 is 200€ from the AVerMedia Amazon.de store. It is 240€ from other retailers. The previous Elgato model (4k60 pro) is 200€ from retailers (Saturn, Amazon.de). It also has HDR10 capture, but it lacks high refresh rate capture (does have throughput though). Max bitrate is also 140 Mbps as per the website, so not sure it is just a firmware restriction or what. So while that particular marketing phrase is trash (maybe they just deem every previous HDR10 capable card non-consumer?), the price difference is also not there (at least for me) and the previous card was only lacking high refresh rate capturing, not HDR, compared to the AVerMedia card. Reply
  • npz - Wednesday, August 21, 2019 - link

    > and it's 100 bucks less than the previous Elgato flagship 4K60 let this overpriced thing

    WTF are you talking about? Avermedia GC573 street prices:

    https://www.newegg.com/avermedia-live-gamer-4k-pci...
    - $290.99

    https://www.amazon.com/AVerMedia-GC573-Live-Gamer-...
    - $290.99

    compared to:
    > The Elgato 4K60 Pro MK.2 card is available directly from Corsair/Elgato as well as various retailers worldwide. In the U.S., the board carries a $249.99 price tag. <===

    Also one thing that I don't see the Avermedia doing, which is actually important especially for recording HDR meant for playback on non-HDR screens:

    https://help.elgato.com/hc/en-us/articles/36003273...

    > • It can tone-map HDR to SDR video on the device.

    (on the device = h/w accel conversion)

    Furthermore, the Avermedia has a limitation that requires an Nvidia card for 4k or HDR or high fps recording. It appears to rely on the GPU for processing or encoding, as oppossed to having all of that built into the hardware
    Reply
  • Diji1 - Thursday, August 22, 2019 - link

    >WTF are you talking about?

    Previously:

    Elgato HD60 RRP: $400

    Avermedia GC573: $300

    >Also one thing that I don't see the Avermedia doing, which is actually important especially for recording HDR meant for playback on non-HDR screens:

    It does this. So I see you know nothing at all about the product or capturing stuff generally. It would be completely pointless if it didn't do this. You are educating yourself using marketing like the clueless author of the article.

    Furthermore, the Avermedia has a limitation that requires an Nvidia card for 4k or HDR or high fps recording. It appears to rely on the GPU for processing or encoding, as oppossed to having all of that built into the hardware

    You do like inventing horseshit don't you: Elgato's card requires a GTX 10 series or higher GPU. Source: Elgato's website that you apparently can't even be bothered to read.

    See, unlike you, I actually own and use the product rather than having stupid discussions where one party use deceptive marketing and their imagination to see which product is better.
    Reply
  • EdgeOfDetroit - Wednesday, August 21, 2019 - link

    How about widescreen? Or are you restricted to 16:9 frame sizes? Reply
  • eastcoast_pete - Wednesday, August 21, 2019 - link

    Any information on what hardware the card uses (which ASIC, manufactured by what company etc.)? Reply
  • lilkwarrior - Thursday, August 22, 2019 - link

    I look forward to the 4K@120hz Pro version in a year or two. It should've went ahead and used HDMI 2.1.

    Next-gen consoles & even the current gen Xbox One X use HDMI 2.1; I suppose it's imminent they'll release that version next year when the next Xbox & Playstation releases.
    Reply

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