Testing Results, Low Fan Speed (7 Volts)

Switching things up a bit, let's next take a look at cooler performance with the NH-U12A fans taken down to 7 Volts.

Core Temperature, Constant Thermal Load (Low Fan Speed)

With the speed of its fans reduced down to 800 RPM, the NH-U12A becomes virtually inaudible to a user that sits one meter away from it. The thermal performance still comes close to 140 mm coolers, with the NH-U12A being unable to match it but landing near them, all while outperforming most other similarly-sized cooling solutions.

Average Thermal Resistance

A closer look at the charts reveals that the NH-U12A actually is rather efficient with the handling of very heavy thermal loads even with reduced airflow. This suggests that the cooler will be able to handle overclocked processors without the thermal control of the motherboard having to shoot the speed of the fans too high, maintaining low noise levels.

Fan Speed (7 Volts)

Noise level

Testing Results, Maximum Fan Speed (12 Volts) Thermal Resistance VS Sound Pressure Level
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  • Skeptical123 - Friday, July 12, 2019 - link

    I think you're misunderstanding the target consumer here. Noctua has made such a solid product for so long now they have established themselves not only as a market leader but as a premium brand. Just look at the NH-U12A for example. While a very good product they raised the price higher giving it likely some of the highest profit margins of any cooler on the market because they can command that price. As their core market segment does not want water coolers no matter the price. Due to too many moving parts, etc. Or simply not have the room in the case and or not want ing to mess around with mounting a radator Reply
  • mobutu - Friday, July 12, 2019 - link

    Way way way too expensive so totally out of the realm of even considering this product.

    For Ryzen is even totally unnecessary unless your into heavy overclocking. You can get mild overclocking with the free included wraith cooler.

    Spending that 100 usdollars into a better cpu/gpu is a no brainer.
    Reply
  • sonny73n - Friday, July 12, 2019 - link

    +1

    Only idiots overclock the CPU and spend more money for the cooler.
    Reply
  • azrael- - Friday, July 12, 2019 - link

    There's some very important info missing from the review: the weight!

    The first thing I look at with a cooler is its weight, considering how most of them hang off the motherboard. There's a reason AMD and Intel have cooler weight recommendations.

    And yes, I know I can simply look up the cooler on Noctua's web site, but that doesn't change the fact that this information should be part of the review.
    Reply
  • jabber - Friday, July 12, 2019 - link

    People always go on about the Coolermaster 212 but it has the suckiest mounting system in HSF history. I detest the things. My heart sinks if a customer brings in a system with one of those. Reply
  • DanNeely - Friday, July 12, 2019 - link

    "Overall, the NH-U12A is designed to fit top-tier cooling performance into a more compact 120 mm cooler, as opposed to larger and more traditional 140 mm coolers."

    This seems like a bit of an odd turn of phrase. AFAIK dual 120mm fan tower coolers have been around almost as long as single 120mm models; which has been a lot longer than 140mm models of any sort started to show up.
    Reply
  • vailr - Friday, July 12, 2019 - link

    For half the price, the Scythe Mugen 5B (~$45 on Amazon) seems to offer equivalent CPU cooling. Reply
  • D@ Br@b($)! - Saturday, July 13, 2019 - link

    +1 and it's more quiet too. Reply
  • djayjp - Friday, July 12, 2019 - link

    Yeah sure 250W load at 7v and only like 55C lol. Bs Reply
  • Soulkeeper - Friday, July 12, 2019 - link

    What was the RPM on the fans ?
    Did they manage to spin at their rated 2000rpm during the testing ?
    Reply

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