We have been teased with AMD’s next generation processor products for over a year. The new chiplet design has been heralded as a significant breakthrough in driving performance and scalability, especially as it becomes increasingly difficult to create large silicon with high frequencies on smaller and smaller process nodes. AMD is expected to deploy its chiplet paradigm across its processor line, through Ryzen and EPYC, with those chiplets each having eight next-generation Zen 2 cores. Today AMD went into more detail about the Zen 2 core, providing justification for the +15% clock-for-clock performance increase over the previous generation that the company presented at Computex last week.

AMD’s Zen 2 Product Portfolio

The current products that AMD has announced that have Zen 2 cores include the Ryzen 3rd Generation consumer CPUs, known as the Ryzen 3000 family, and AMD’s next generation enterprise EPYC processor, known as Rome. As of today, AMD has announced explicit details of six consumer Ryzen 3000 processors, including core counts, frequencies, memory support, and power. Details about the server processor, aside from some peak values, are expected in due course over the next few months.

AMD 'Matisse' Ryzen 3000 Series CPUs
AnandTech Cores
Threads
Base
Freq
Boost
Freq
L2
Cache
L3
Cache
PCIe
4.0
DDR4 TDP Price
(SEP)
Ryzen 9 3950X 16C 32T 3.5 4.7 8 MB 64 MB 16+4+4 3200 105W $749
Ryzen 9 3900X 12C 24T 3.8 4.6 6 MB 64 MB 16+4+4 3200 105W $499
Ryzen 7 3800X 8C 16T 3.9 4.5 4 MB 32 MB 16+4+4 3200 105W $399
Ryzen 7 3700X 8C 16T 3.6 4.4 4 MB 32 MB 16+4+4 3200 65W $329
Ryzen 5 3600X 6C 12T 3.8 4.4 3 MB 32 MB 16+4+4 3200 95W $249
Ryzen 5 3600 6C 12T 3.6 4.2 3 MB 32 MB 16+4+4 3200 65W $199

The Zen 2 design paradigm, compared to the first generation of Zen, has changed significantly. The new platform and core implementation is designed around small 8-core chiplets built on TSMC’s 7nm manufacturing process, and measure around 74-80 square millimeters. On these chiplets are two groups of four-cores arranged in a ‘core complex’, or CCX, which contains those four cores and a set of L3 cache – the L3 cache is doubled for Zen 2 over Zen 1.

Each full CPU, regardless of how many chiplets it has, is paired with a central IO die through Infinity Fabric links. The IO die acts as the central hub for all off-chip communications, as it houses all the PCIe lanes for the processor, as well as memory channels, and Infinity Fabric links to other chiplets or other CPUs. The IO die for the EPYC Rome processors is built on Global Foundries' 14nm process, however the consumer processor IO dies (which are smaller and contain fewer features) are built on the Global Foundries 12nm process.

The consumer processors, known as ‘Matisse’ or Ryzen 3rd Gen or Ryzen 3000-series, will be offered with up to two chiplets for sixteen cores. AMD is launching six versions of Matisse on July 7th, from six cores to sixteen cores. The six and eight-core processors have one chiplet, while above this the parts will have two chiplets, but in all cases the IO die is the same. This means that every Zen 2 based Ryzen 3000 processor will have access to 24 PCIe 4.0 lanes and dual channel memory. Based on the announcements today, the prices will range from $199 for the Ryzen 5 3600, up to $700+ for the sixteen core (we’re waiting on final confirmation of this price).

The EPYC Rome processors, built on these Zen 2 chiplets, will have up to eight of them, enabling a platform that can support up to 64 cores. As with the consumer processors, no chiplet can communicate directly with each other – each chiplet will only connect directly to the central IO die. That IO die houses links for eight memory channels, and up to 128 lanes of PCIe 4.0 connectivity.

AMD’s Roadmap

Before diving into the new product line, it is worth recapping where we currently sit in AMD’s planned roadmap.

In previous roadmaps, showcasing AMD’s movement from Zen to Zen 2 and Zen 3, the company has explained that this multi-year structure will showcase Zen in 2017, Zen 2 in 2019, and Zen 3 by 2021. The cadence isn’t exactly a year, as it has depended on AMD’s design and manufacturing abilities, as well as agreements with its partners in the foundries and the current market forces.

AMD has stated that its plan for Zen 2 was to always launch on 7nm, which ended up being TSMC’s 7nm (Global Foundries wasn’t going to be ready in time for 7nm, and ultimately pulled the plug). The next generation Zen 3 is expected to align with an updated 7nm process, and at this point AMD has not made any comment about a potential ‘Zen 2+’ design in the works, although at this point we do not expect to see one.

Beyond Zen 3, AMD has already stated that Zen 4 and Zen 5 are currently in various levels of their respective design stages, although the company has not committed to particular time frames or process node technologies. AMD has stated in the past that the paradigms of these platforms and processor designs are being set 3-5 years in advance, and the company states it has to make big bets every generation to ensure it can remain competitive.

For a small insight into Zen 4, in an interview with Forrest Norrod, SVP of AMD’s Enterprise, Embedded, and Semi-Custom group, at Computex, he exclusively revealed to AnandTech the code name of AMD’s Zen 4 EPYC processor: Genoa.

AMD EPYC CPU Codenames
Gen Year Name Cores
1st 2017 Naples 32 x Zen 1
2nd 2019 Rome 64 x Zen 2
3rd 2020 Milan ? x Zen 3
4th ? Genoa ? x Zen 4
5th ? ? ? x Zen 5

Forrest explained that the Zen 5 code name follows a similar pattern, but would not comment on the time frame for the Zen 4 product. Given that the Zen 3 design is expected mid-2020, that would put a Zen 4 product for late 2021/early 2022, if AMD follows its cadence. How this will play into AMD’s consumer roadmap plans is unclear at this point, and will depend on how AMD approaches its chiplet paradigm and any future adjustments to its packaging technology in order to enable further performance improvements.

Performance Claims of Zen 2
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  • nandnandnand - Tuesday, June 11, 2019 - link

    Shouldn't we be looking at highest transistors per square millimeter plotted over time? The Wikipedia article helpfully includes die area for most of the processors, but the graph near the top just plots number of transistors without regard to die size. If Intel's Xe hype is accurate, they will be putting out massive GPUs (1600 mm^2?) made of multiple connected dies, and AMD already does something similar with CPU chiplets.

    I know that the original Moore's law did not take into account die size, multi chip modules, etc. but to ignore that seems cheaty now. Regardless, performance is what really matters. Hopefully we see tight integration of CPU and L4 DRAM cache boosting performance within the next 2-3 years.
    Reply
  • Wilco1 - Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - link

    Moore's law is about transistors on a single integrated chip. But yes density matters too, especially actual density achieved in real chips (rather than marketing slides). TSMC 7nm does 80-90 million transistors/mm^2 for A12X, Kirin 980, Snapdragon 8cx. Intel is still stuck at ~16 million transistors/mm^2. Reply
  • FunBunny2 - Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - link

    enough about Moore, unless you can get it right. Moore said nothing about transistors. He said that compute capability was doubling about every second year. This is what he actually wrote:

    "The complexity for minimum component costs has increased at a rate of roughly a factor of two per year. Certainly over the short term this rate can be expected to continue, if not to increase. Over the longer term, the rate of increase is a bit more uncertain, although there is no reason to believe it will not remain nearly constant for at least 10 years. "

    [the wiki]

    the main reason the Law has slowed is just physics: Xnm is little more (teehee) than propaganda for some years, at least since the end of agreed dimensions of what a 'transistor' was. couple that with the coalescing of the maths around 'the best' compute algorithms; complexity has run into the limiting factor of the maths. you can see it in these comments: gimme more ST, I don't care about cores. and so on. Mother Nature's Laws are fixed and immutable; we just don't know all of them at any given moment, but we're getting closer. in the old days, we had the saying 'doing the easy 80%'. we're well into the tough 20%.
    Reply
  • extide - Monday, June 17, 2019 - link

    "The complexity for minimum component costs..."

    He was directly referring to transistor count with the word "complexity" in your quote -- so yes he was literally talking about transistor count.
    Reply
  • crazy_crank - Tuesday, June 11, 2019 - link

    Actually the number of cores doesn't matter AFAIK, as Moores Law originally only was about transistor density, so all you need to compare is transistors per square millimeter. Looked at it like this, it actually doesn't even look that bad Reply
  • chada - Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - link

    Moore's law specifically talks about density doubling. If they can fit 6 cores into the same footprint, you can absolutely consider 6 cores for a density comparison. That being said, we have been off this pace for a while. Reply
  • III-V - Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - link

    >Moore's law specifically talks about density doubling.

    No it doesn't.

    Jesus Christ, why is Moore's Law so fucking hard for people to understand?
    Reply
  • LordSojar - Thursday, June 13, 2019 - link

    Why it ever became known as a "law" is totally beyond me. More like Moore's Theory (and that's pushing it, as he made a LOT of suppositions about things he couldn't possibly predict, not being an expert in those areas. ie material sciences, quantum mechanics, etc) Reply
  • sing_electric - Friday, June 14, 2019 - link

    This. He wasn't describing something fundamental about the way nature works - he was looking at technological advancements in one field over a short time frame. I guess 'Moore's Observation" just didn't sound as good.

    And the reason why no one seems to get it right is that Moore wrote and said several different things about it over the years - he'd OBSERVED that the number of transistors you could get on an IC was increasing at a certain rate, and from there, that this lead to performance increases, so both the density AND performance arguments have some amount of accuracy behind them.

    And almost no one points out that it's ultimately just a function of geometry: As process decreases linearly (say, 10 units to 7 units) , you get a geometric increase in the # of transistors because you get to multiply that by two dimensions. Other benefits - like decreased power use per transistor, etc. - ultimately flow largely from that as well (or they did, before we had to start using more and more exotic materials to get shrinks to work.)
    Reply
  • FunBunny2 - Thursday, June 13, 2019 - link

    "Jesus Christ, why is Moore's Law so fucking hard for people to understand?"

    because, in this era of truthiness, simplistic is more fun than reality. Moore made his observation in 1965, at which time IC fabrication had not even reached LSI levels. IOW, the era when node size was dropping like a stone and frequency was rising like a Saturn rocket; performance increases with each new iteration of a device were obvious to even the most casual observer. just like prices in the housing market before the Great Recession, the simpleminded still think that both vectors will continue forevvvvaaahhh.
    Reply

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