MSI MEG X570 Unify

The MSI MEG X570 Unify combines sleek and uniformed all-black aesthetics without the swathes of RGB LEDs which some users find garish. With similar specifications to the MSI MEG X570 Ace which we reviewed at launch, the MEG X570 Unify takes a more direct approach with some very interesting features. Not only has MSI dropped all of the fancy plastic on the rear panel cover and removes the integrated RGB LEDs, but the power delivery heatsink is incorporated into the large aluminium rear panel cover to create a massive and robust cooling solution for power users; the X570 Unify is using a 14-phase power delivery design and two 8-pin 12 V ATX connectors for power. The Unify is more focused towards enthusiasts and represents MSI's higher-tier of X570 models. 

Looking at the core feature set, the MSI MEG X570 Unify includes three PCIe 4.0 x4 M.2 slots which each come with individual heatsinks for improved cooling performance when used with NVMe based drives. Also included four SATA ports and for the networking, included is a Realtek RTL8125 2.5 G NIC with an Intel AX200 Wi-Fi 6 802.11ax wireless interface. On the rear panel, there is a Realtek ALC1220 HD audio codec with three USB 3.1 G2 Type-A, one USB 3.1 G2 Type-C, two USB 3.1 G1 Type-A, and two USB 2.0 ports. Also present is a clear CMOS button, a Flash BIOS button, and a PS/2 combo port. There are three full-length PCIe 4.0 slots which operate at x16, x8/x8, and x8/x8/x4, as well as two PCIe 4.0 x1 slots. Supported memory speeds allow for DDR4-4600 and up to 128 GB to be installed.

Everything about this model screams enthusiast, but without all of the bells and whistles of the MEG X570 Ace. The MSI MEG X570 Unify even managed to push a Ryzen 9 3900X to 5857.01 MHz which is the current highest frequency for this processor on HWBot. That sends a very clear message that this model is suited for overclocking, but still provides users with the same premium desktop motherboard features as other competitive models in its product segment. At present, there is no pricing information available, but it's likely to cost around the same as the MSI MEG X570 Ace ($370).

MSI MEG X570 Ace MSI Prestige X570 Creation
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  • ChubChub - Friday, July 12, 2019 - link

    Would be cool to see the CPU on one side of the board, and the cards on the other; would shrink those distances, but would require a new form factor, which would kindof suck (but I can picture what the dual-sided boards would look like, and I think it's a pretty neat idea having two independent sides for cooling (also, in a tower setup, a CPU sitting vertically on the board, which would be nice). Reply
  • Targon - Thursday, July 11, 2019 - link

    This is why if Gen-Z gets adopted, we could have PCI Express hanging off the Gen-Z bus as a way to deal with these issues. Reply
  • sing_electric - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    I was thinking that the mobo costs made price comparisons more difficult. Then I remembered that AMD is still throwing in a pretty good stock cooler, while Intel makes you BYO. For MOST users, that means that your total build cost will be lower with AMD.

    If you're doing something exotic - say, with liquid cooling or heavy overclocking that requires a certain thermal solution - then sure, you lose those savings, but if you're spending $300 to keep your machine cool, is the price difference of the motherboard really going to sway you one way or another?
    Reply
  • Oliseo - Thursday, July 11, 2019 - link

    You're actually comparing the bundled CPU cooler to a $300 custom loop Intel Cooler?

    You're expecting people to take you seriously as well?
    Reply
  • Targon - Thursday, July 11, 2019 - link

    Consider that for those who buy the i9-9900k, you can't get away with a 95W cooler, even if the rated TDP is 95W. So, you do need to buy at least a $30 cooler for air cooling on the 9900k, while AMD does provide a cooler to handle the typical performance of its processors. Even then, $330 for the Ryzen 7 3700X or 3800X for 8 cores/16 threads, vs. the $489 for the 9900k+$30 or $40 will still be more expensive for an 8 core/16 thread chip.

    What many don't realize is that if you go with AMD and get a B450 or X470 chipset motherboard(that has an updated BIOS or with BIOS flashback), you get the motherboard price you want, and the cost of ownership will still be lower. Since Intel doesn't offer PCI Express 4.0, going with PCI Express 3.0 on the AMD side won't be a big deal from the comparison point of view. Overclocking potential has not been compared between the enthusiast class X470 and X570 based motherboards from what I have seen as well, but it could make a difference for many people.
    Reply
  • Flunk - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    I like how almost all of these boards have 2 or more M.2 slots. I had to be very careful when I bought my Z170 board to find one with 3 M.2 slots.

    But now there are boards with 3 slots so maybe I'll have to snag that Aorus Ultra.
    Reply
  • drexnx - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    it's amazing how fast number of M.2 slots has become the primary thing I look for in a mobo anymore too Reply
  • abufrejoval - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    It's amazing how quickly you run out of PCIe lanes, when you don't have switches to multiplex and translate between PCIe revisions and lanes (e.g. PCIe v4 x2 <-> PCIe v2 x8).

    I find myself using USB 3.x NBase-T NICs and NVMe adapters, simply because they *do* switch.
    Reply
  • Bensam123 - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    Maybe a bit more depth on the power delivery page. I have absolutely no idea how to go about parsing what's there. More chokes is better? What denotes a power phase? Reply
  • A5 - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    +1. Some analysis of that information would be helpful. Reply

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