GIGABYTE X570 Aorus Master

Moving down the product stack from GIGABYTE's X570 SKU list is the GIGABYTE X570 Aorus Master which has a range of high-end features such as 2.5 Gigabit LAN, three PCIe 4.0 M.2 slots, and Intel's Wi-Fi 6 802.11ax wireless interface. The GIGABYTE X570 Aorus Master could be considered its flagship for general consumers without the hefty price tag attached to the higher grade X570 Aorus Extreme ($699). 

Included is support for up to 128 GB of DDR4 memory across its four slots, with support for DDR4-4400 with three PCIe 4.0 x4 M.2 slots each with its own individual M.2 heatsink, and six SATA ports. There are three full-length PCIe 4.0 slots which operate at x16, x8/x8, and x8/x8/x4, with a single PCIe 4.0 x1 slot. On the power delivery front, GIGABYTE is using a formidable setup with a 12+2 design with power stages rated for 50 A, and with two 8-pin 12 V ATX CPU power inputs. The boards aesthetic is focused on the outer edges with a rear panel cover with RGB LEDs which stretches down to the audio PCB. For the X570 chipset, there's an actively cooled chipset heatsink which encompasses the Aorus Falcon into the design.

The onboard audio is handled by a Realtek ALC1220-VB HD audio codec and is complemented by an ESS Sabre 9118 DAC chip to enhance the auditory quality. This equates to five 3.5 mm audio jacks with a single S/PDIF optical output. Also on the rear panel is a Q-Flash Plus button for updating the firmware, a clear CMOS button, three USB 3.1 G2 Type-A, one USB 3.1 G2 Type-C, two USB 3.1 G1 Type-A and four USB 2.0 ports. The board's rear panel networking capabilities consist a Realtek RTL8125AG 2.5 G port with an assisting Intel Gigabit port for dual networking, as well as an Intel AX200 802.11ax Wi-Fi 6 wireless interface which also includes support for BT 5 devices. 

GIGABYTE's X570 Aorus Master targets gamers and enthusiasts looking to push their processors further than the rated specifications, as well as offering 2.5 G and Wi-Fi 6 capable networking. The pricing reflects this with a price tag of $359 which puts it in the upper echelon of models, but the price seems fair all things considered.

GIGABYTE X570 Aorus Xtreme GIGABYTE X570 Aorus Ultra
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  • shing3232 - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    3950X power requirement is the same as 3900X,and 3900X works on B350. I am pretty sure it would work on X370 with Bios update. Reply
  • Irata - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    I think the combination of complaining about expensive boards + wanting to get the highest end (most expensive) 16C Ryzen is a bit unusual.

    The good thing is that there is choice ? Want to go the cheap route ? Go for 3xx board. Want the "bestestest" - now you can buy a $1000 board to go with your Ryzen CPU. And everything in between is also covered.
    Reply
  • eva02langley - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    It is more related to the active cooling for the chipset that raise my concerns. If the fan die, it can become really troublesome fast. Reply
  • abufrejoval - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    Unless you happen to have an older Ryzen or Carrizo lying around, there could be a problem to get older boards with an up-to-date BIOS.

    Had similar issues a year ago when RAM was so expensive, I had to recycle DDR3 for Kaby Lake CPUs using Z170 motherboards that only has Skylake support. Sandy Bridge, Ivy Bridge and Haswell CPUs I had galore, but Skylake only as notebooks. I wound up buying a Sky Lake i3, which I then returned for a full refund after I had updated the motherboards.

    Didn't feel good about it, wasn't given a choice either.

    These days some dealers offer a BIOS upgrade service, but at €40 it pretty much eats the 3. + 4. generation benefit.

    I want 10Gbase-T or rather NBase-T. Currently that means mostly Aquantia 107, of which I have 4 already. Those are €88 a piece, but when I look at these x570 prices, they charge a 300% premium for what's essentially a low-cost chip.

    And then I hear rumors, that there is actually 10Gbit Ethernet or in fact 100Gbit Ethernet already on-die, both in the CPU chiplet and the x570 chipset variant: For IF Ethernet is simply another protocol to run on the fabric and all you need is PHY.

    It is rather unfortunate that sane CPU prices, sane SSDs and sane RAM only mean that motherboard vendors are hoping to cash in big-time.

    I can see how they would be hungry. But I don't have 'waste money' around to feed them.
    Reply
  • The_Assimilator - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    Asus boards have a "BIOS flashback" feature whereby if you plug in a flash drive with a new BIOS to a specific USB port and press a button on the IO panel, the board will auto-flash itself with that BIOS - no CPU is needed, just power to the board. Reply
  • Targon - Thursday, July 11, 2019 - link

    Almost all MSI motherboards have BIOS flashback, and the Asus ROG Crosshair series also has BIOS flashback where you don't need a CPU or RAM in order to flash the BIOS. Most Asus motherboards do NOT have BIOS flashback capability. Reply
  • DanNeely - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    when they get PCI4 support Intel's boards will be equally more expensive than the previous generation. Maintaining that high frequency a signal across more than a cm or 2 requires building boards to a much higher and more expensive standard or active signal booster chips along the path.

    PCIe 5 will be far worse on that front. Estimates I saw earlier this year were that PCIe4 would add as much as $100 to the price of a board; with the cheapest x570 boards being almost $100 more than the cheapest x470's on Newegg and the average (excluding the crazy halo ones) looking like it's at least $50 higher that doesn't seem too far off. That article (ee times asia???) was predicting that PCIe5 could end up adding as much as $400 above the cost of a 3.0 capable board; which if true probably means it will end up server only or with only a narrow strip between the CPU and chipset build up to that standard. (Assuming the latter possible anyway: If the cost challenge is more preventing external interference than in needing higher quality materials a local board segment fudge might not be feasible.)
    Reply
  • abufrejoval - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    PCI4 and 5, or for that matter IF will trigger rethinking motherboard layouts and form factors.

    "The [Enthusiast] motherboard" dates back to 1981 or the dawn of the IBM Personal Computer, and physics are catching up everywhere, even on the motherboard.

    Distance has a huge impact on speed, latency and power, so 'flat' and 'square' are both the first obstacles and the first who need to compromise. In the future every milimeter of distance between the die carrier and your point of interest will need to be paid for, in energy/time or extra switching silicon.

    Linear extrapolations of the past have little use, when the barriers are exponential.
    Reply
  • TheUnhandledException - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    Even if you keep the board a square moving the CPU and chipset to the center of the board and having PCIe slots on either side would cut the trace to the furthest slots in half. Reply
  • The_Assimilator - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    Hopefully at the same time we can ditch 12V as the rail to rule them all, so that we can bring the amperages in current systems back down to sane levels. Reply

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