GIGABYTE X570 Aorus Elite & X570 Aorus Elite WIFI

Sitting below the GIGABYTE X570 Aorus Pro duo is another pair of ATX models, the X570 Aorus Elite and X570 Aorus Elite WIFI. Both share the same PCB and core feature set which includes a 12+2 power delivery, two full-length PCIe 4.0 slots with support for two-way AMD CrossFire, and two PCIe 4.0 x4 M.2 slots. The only difference between the X570 Aorus Elite and X570 Aorus Elite WIFI is that the latter includes an Intel AX200 Wi-Fi 802.11ax wireless interface, but for a slightly higher cost.

On the boards aesthetic, GIGABYTE has gone with a subtle black and silver theme with black power delivery heatsinks, and a silver and black X570 chipset heatsink which includes a cooling fan. This model includes two full-length PCIe 4.0 slots with the top slot running at x16, and the bottom locked down to x4 which is handled directly by the X570 chipset. The GIGABYTE X570 Aorus Elite also has two PCIe 4.0 x1 slots, as well as two PCIe 4.0 x4 M.2 slots, with the top slot which comes with an M.2 heatsink. For users with SATA based drives, there is a total of six SATA ports with support for RAID 0, 1, and 10 arrays. The 12+2 phase power delivery is running from an ISL69138 PWM controller which is operating in 6+1; this model is one of just a handful to include one 8-pin 12 V ATX CPU power input for delivering power to the processor.

The rear panel of the X570 Aorus Elite includes two USB 3.1 G2 Type-A, four USB 3.1 G1 Type-A, and four USB 2.0 ports. There's no USB Type-C available on this model, but there is a single HDMI video output, as well as an Intel I211-AT Gigabit NIC controlled Ethernet port. The onboard audio which consists of five 3.5 mm audio jacks and S/PDIF optical output are driven by a Realtek ALC1200 HD audio codec. On the rear panel of the GIGABYTE X570 Aorus Elite WIFI is two antenna adapters for the Intel AX200 Wi-Fi 6 802.11ax wireless interface and also adds BT 5.0 connectivity to the board.

The GIGABYTE X570 Aorus Elite has an MSRP of $199, while the Wi-FI 6 enabled version comes in with an MSRP of $209; that's $10 extra for the same board with an Intel AX200 802.11ax wireless interface. Both models represent a good feature set for a reasonable price, and users looking for a gaming-themed model with a seemingly decent power delivery and two PCIe 4.0 x4 M.2 slots, both these models stake a good claim for good value.

GIGABYTE X570 Aorus Pro & X570 Aorus Pro WIFI GIGABYTE X570 I Aorus Pro WIFI
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  • FreckledTrout - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    I'm waiting for the next iteration of board for this reason. I'm speculating the next round the chipset will be on 7nm. Reply
  • abufrejoval - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    The genious about that chiplet design is that the chipset doesn't actually benefit nearly as much from the shrink, as pure logic or SLC caches: The monolithic guys pay the 7nm overhead (e.g. EUV) for I/O while the geometry of the transistors in the I/O area is mostly determined by the need to power long motherbord or even slot traces.

    So while waiting is never a bad idea when your need clearly isn't overwhelming you, waiting for that shrink could turn out rather long. These days I/O heave chips might never be done in smaller geometries, because of that and because packaging has matured.
    Reply
  • Mr Perfect - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    Yeah, I'm having flashbacks over here. Weedy little fans screaming along at 6000RPM, then choking up on a dust bunny or wearing out the bearing.

    Do we know what process they used for the X570? Is it the same 55nm they used for the X470? Here's hoping they shrink it a little for X670.
    Reply
  • DigitalFreak - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    14nm Reply
  • erotomania - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    55nm Reply
  • DanNeely - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    no. X470 and below were 55nm (designed by ASMedia on an ancient process to keep everything cheap as dirt), X570 was done in house on 14nm. Ryzen 3's IO die is also 14nm (the much larger Epyc one was done at 12nm). Reply
  • erotomania - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    Weedy, man! Those weedy fans Reply
  • sing_electric - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    Given how little chipsets benefit from process shrinks, some part of me honestly wonders if there's any sense in going even further back to the future and dividing the chipset into a north/southbridge (or some other similar config) so that the heat can at least be spread out, getting rid of the need for a failure-prone mechanical part on your motherboard. Reply
  • YoloPascual - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    z77 extreme 4 to x570 extreme 4 👊👊 Reply
  • The_Assimilator - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    I also owned a Z77 Extreme 4 at one time, and the X570 version is probably the closest to perfect that I've seen offered so far. If only it had a couple of extra USB ports on the back panel, it'd be a shoe-in. Reply

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