ASRock X570 Pro4 & X570M Pro4

ASRock unveiled a number of its X570 models during Computex 2019: a lot of gaming-focused models, and some extremely high-end offerings, but the ATX sized ASRock X570 Pro4 and microATX X570M Pro4 looks set to offer users less bling and more functionality at a lower price point.

Starting with the design of the ASRock X570 Pro4 and X570M Pro4 models, both models use the same silver and black theme throughout, with shining silver heatsinks, and a solid looking aluminium rear panel cover which doubles up as the power delivery heatsink. Both the ATX and microATX models use the same 10-phase power delivery, with both opting to use a single 8-pin 12 V EPS CPU power input. Both have dual PCIe 4.0 M.2 slots with one M.2 heatsink, with eight SATA ports, and both also use an Intel Gigabit LAN port, and a Realtek ALC1220 HD audio codec.


ASRock X570 Pro4 motherboard

The primary difference aside from the form factor is the ASRock X570 Pro4 naturally has more PCB space for extra PCIe connectivity. This includes two PCIe 4.0 x1 slots on the X570 Pro4 compared to the single PCIe 4.0 x1 on the X570M Pro4, but surprisingly, both feature two full-length PCIe 4.0 x4 slots and an M.2 Key E for users to add their own Wi-Fi/BT module. Both include a DisplayPort and HDMI video output on the rear panel, and four memory slots capable of supporting up to DDR4-4066 with a maximum capacity of up to 64 GB.


ASRock X570M Pro4 microATX motherboard at Computex 2019

The rear panel on both the ASRock X570 Pro4 and X570M Pro4 are identical in terms of connections and includes a single USB 3.1 G2 Type-A, a single USB 3.1 G2 Type-C, six USB 3.1 G1 Type-A ports, and a single Ethernet port powered by an Intel I211AT Gigabit controller. For audio, there are three color coded 3.5 mm audio jacks which is controlled by a Realtek ALC1200 HD audio codec.

It's clear that the X570 Pro4 and X570M Pro4 models are aimed at users with more a more professional focus; this is prevalent in the feature set and the aesthetic. There is nothing flashy about the Pro4, but it does represent a more modest offering in its X570 product stack with the X570 Pro4 priced at $170, with the X570M Pro4 coming in at a slightly higher MSRP of $186

ASRock X570 Extreme4 ASUS ROG Crosshair VIII Formula
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  • npz - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    Well, you do have one choice, the GIGABYTE X570 Aorus Xtreme is fanless.
    I doubt they are that loud as they were in the past though, as it's a variable speed fan now.
    Reply
  • FreckledTrout - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    I'm waiting for the next iteration of board for this reason. I'm speculating the next round the chipset will be on 7nm. Reply
  • abufrejoval - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    The genious about that chiplet design is that the chipset doesn't actually benefit nearly as much from the shrink, as pure logic or SLC caches: The monolithic guys pay the 7nm overhead (e.g. EUV) for I/O while the geometry of the transistors in the I/O area is mostly determined by the need to power long motherbord or even slot traces.

    So while waiting is never a bad idea when your need clearly isn't overwhelming you, waiting for that shrink could turn out rather long. These days I/O heave chips might never be done in smaller geometries, because of that and because packaging has matured.
    Reply
  • Mr Perfect - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    Yeah, I'm having flashbacks over here. Weedy little fans screaming along at 6000RPM, then choking up on a dust bunny or wearing out the bearing.

    Do we know what process they used for the X570? Is it the same 55nm they used for the X470? Here's hoping they shrink it a little for X670.
    Reply
  • DigitalFreak - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    14nm Reply
  • erotomania - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    55nm Reply
  • DanNeely - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    no. X470 and below were 55nm (designed by ASMedia on an ancient process to keep everything cheap as dirt), X570 was done in house on 14nm. Ryzen 3's IO die is also 14nm (the much larger Epyc one was done at 12nm). Reply
  • erotomania - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    Weedy, man! Those weedy fans Reply
  • sing_electric - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    Given how little chipsets benefit from process shrinks, some part of me honestly wonders if there's any sense in going even further back to the future and dividing the chipset into a north/southbridge (or some other similar config) so that the heat can at least be spread out, getting rid of the need for a failure-prone mechanical part on your motherboard. Reply
  • YoloPascual - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    z77 extreme 4 to x570 extreme 4 👊👊 Reply

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