ASUS ROG Strix X570-E Gaming

ASUS's Strix brand represents its more mid-range gaming focused offerings and the ASUS ROG Strix X570-E Gaming is one of two ATX sized Strix branded boards, with the X570-E being the more premium of the two models; the other being the slightly lower spec ASUS ROG Strix X570-F Gaming. Included is support for two-way NVIDIA SLI and up to three-way AMD CrossFire multi-graphics cards configurations, 2.5 Gigabit networking, and a Wi-Fi 6 wireless interface.

The ASUS ROG Strix X570-E includes the gaming-focused Realtek RTL8125G 2.5 Gigabit NIC with a second port controlled by an Intel I211-AT Gigabit NIC. The board's wireless capabilities come from the new Intel AX200 Wi-Fi 6 802.11ax adapter. The board boasts three full-length PCIe 4.0 slots which operate at x16, x8/x8, and x8/x8/x4, with the final four coming directly from the X570 chipset. The Strix themed chipset heatsink has two M.2 heatsinks emanating from the top and bottom side for the boards dual PCIe 4.0 M.2 and has a cooling fan integrated which is designed to keep the X570 chipset cool. The ROG Strix X570-E also has eight SATA ports and four DDR4 memory slots with support for up to 128 GB.

In terms of USB connectivity on the rear panel, there are three USB 3.1 G2 Type-A, one USB 3.1 G2 Type-C, and four USB 3.1 G1 Type-A ports. A SupremeFX S1220 HD audio codec powers the five color-coded 3.5 mm jacks, and an S/PDIF optical out, while a pair of video outputs consisting of an HDMI 2.0 and DisplayPort 1.2 output is featured. A handily located BIOS Flashback button and a single USB 3.1 G1 Type-A dedicated to this are clearly highlighted, and the ROG Strix X570-E also benefits from dual Ethernet ports with one being controlled by a Realtek RTL8125-CG 2.5 Gigabit NIC, while the other is driven by an Intel I1211-AT Gigabit NIC. There are also two antenna inputs for the Intel AX200 802.11ax Wi-Fi 6 wireless interface which also adds BT 5 connectivity into the mix.

The ASUS ROG Strix X570-E Gaming has an MSRP of $330 and represents its bridge between the mid-range and the higher end Crosshair VIII models. With Wi-Fi 6, 2.5 Gigabit + 1 Gigabit NICs and a SupremeFX S1220A HD audio codec and two-way NVIDIA SLI support, users looking for a high-quality ASUS X570 model may not have to look further than the Strix X570-F.

ASUS ROG Crosshair VIII Impact ASUS ROG Strix X570-F Gaming
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  • Aikouka - Thursday, July 11, 2019 - link

    ASRock Rack has a Ryzen motherboard that officially supports ECC and also has IPMI support (X470D4U). They're also developing a Threadripper variant of their Epyc server board that has IPMI support, but it uses the X370 chipset. Reply
  • cascadehealthcare - Tuesday, August 13, 2019 - link

    Authorized seller of thousands of top-quality medical products, supplies and equipment at a competitive price. We have online presence that serves the needs of Assisted Living Homes, Nursing Facilities, Hospitals, Government Agencies, Schools and Military Locations across the country. Cascade Healthcare Solutions was founded on the premise of helping our customers save money and making their buying experience as smooth as possible.
    Authorized seller of thousands of top-quality medical products, supplies and equipment at a competitive price. We have online presence that serves the needs of Assisted Living Homes, Nursing Facilities, Hospitals, Government Agencies, Schools and Military Locations across the country. Cascade Healthcare Solutions was founded on the premise of helping our customers save money and making their buying experience as smooth as possible.
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    Reply
  • DigitalFreak - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    Agreed. The major differences between pricing in motherboards nowadays is how well they support overclocking, how many / what type of Ethernet ports, and how much RGB garbage they throw on there. :-) Reply
  • brunis.dk - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    Retarded Garbage Blinking! Reply
  • 29a - Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - link

    RGB changes the price by pennies at the most. Reply
  • jrs77 - Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - link

    If it wasn't for the optical digital output I'd agree, but these seem to be rather rare and not common at all. A couple years back that wasn't the case, so I see an actual backwards trend here that comes with a lack of necessary ports. Atleast an optical digital output is necessary for me. Reply
  • lmcd - Friday, July 26, 2019 - link

    I mean sure, but a decent number of them were completely useless from a terrible onboard chipset. Pretty sure one of my two desktops had one that maxed out at 2.0 channel over optical digital output. Reply
  • Silma - Thursday, July 11, 2019 - link

    This would have been true, but for the dearth of ThunderBolt 3 ports, needed for audio interfaces for example.
    lso the price of most of the boards is outrageous compared to their real added value, imho.
    Reply
  • umano - Friday, July 12, 2019 - link

    I agree with Silma, for example the great asrock x299 itx at launch had a price tag of 399, with 4 memory channel and sodimm slot and 3 nvme. Something's wrong, or the amd statement is false (most modern i/o), or the mb manufacturers did not get the best from x570 Reply
  • regsEx - Friday, July 19, 2019 - link

    I like it either. But back in days, top Intel's Asrock P67 Fatali1y Professional was priced at $120. For that price you were getting 16+2 phase power, cooling with a pipe 3 brand new Etron USB 3.0 controllers (USB 3.2 Gen 1), additional PCIe controller, best at the time Realtek ALC892 sound, 2 Realtek RTL8111 LAN controllers, additional Marvell SATA controller, Dr. Debug display, power and reset buttons, 3.5" front USB 3 panel, additional rear USB 3 bracket and SLI bridge in the box. That was first generation of motherboards of XMP profiles and new graphical AMI UEFI (return of graphical AMI BIOS after 15 years) etc etc. Just $120. Now to get similar set you have to pay at least $360. And for $120 you can only get some poor office board. And ASRock was cheapest of high end boards back then. Now it's most expensive. Reply

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