Gaming: Final Fantasy XV

Upon arriving to PC earlier this, Final Fantasy XV: Windows Edition was given a graphical overhaul as it was ported over from console, fruits of their successful partnership with NVIDIA, with hardly any hint of the troubles during Final Fantasy XV's original production and development.

In preparation for the launch, Square Enix opted to release a standalone benchmark that they have since updated. Using the Final Fantasy XV standalone benchmark gives us a lengthy standardized sequence to record, although it should be noted that its heavy use of NVIDIA technology means that the Maximum setting has problems - it renders items off screen. To get around this, we use the standard preset which does not have these issues.

Square Enix has patched the benchmark with custom graphics settings and bugfixes to be much more accurate in profiling in-game performance and graphical options. For our testing, we run the standard benchmark with a FRAPs overlay, taking a 6 minute recording of the test.

AnandTech CPU Gaming 2019 Game List
Game Genre Release Date API IGP Low Med High
Final Fantasy XV JRPG Mar
2018
DX11 720p
Standard
1080p
Standard
4K
Standard
8K
Standard

All of our benchmark results can also be found in our benchmark engine, Bench.

AnandTech IGP Low Medium High
Average FPS
95th Percentile

At 4K, the differences are minimal, though at the lower resolutions there is still some performance on the table.

Gaming: World of Tanks enCore Gaming: Shadow of War
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  • Korguz - Tuesday, February 12, 2019 - link

    keep in mind Pajuk, the prices Anandtech quotes.. are US dollars i think.. Reply
  • Karthick7 - Monday, February 11, 2019 - link

    This has eventually encouraged a lot of others <a href="https://hosting-india.in/best-java-hosting-india/&... WordPress Hosting India</a> to look forward to starting their own WordPress websites. Reply
  • Ej24 - Tuesday, February 12, 2019 - link

    Really would have liked to have seen more Intel 4c/4t and 4c/8t cpu's for comparison, like 4690k, 6700k or 7700k. I'm curious how my 4790k stacks up to amds zen+ 4c/8t cpu but from the others tested its hard to say. Reply
  • Rudde - Tuesday, February 12, 2019 - link

    Visit bench? Reply
  • BlackSwan - Tuesday, February 12, 2019 - link

    This OEM version is already available for retail purchase here in Russia

    https://www.regard.ru/catalog/tovar304279.htm?ymcl...
    Reply
  • BlackSwan - Tuesday, February 12, 2019 - link

    https://www.regard.ru/catalog/tovar304288.htm

    2700е
    Reply
  • The_Assimilator - Tuesday, February 12, 2019 - link

    AMD's CPU naming scheme is a bit of a mess now. Used to be that Ryzen 7 = 8c/16t, 5 = 6c/12t, 3 = 4c/4t but now we have 4c/8t parts mucking up the 5s. IMO they should reorder their lineup by core and thread counts by moving current Ryzen 3 to 1, and 4c/8t CPUs from Ryzen 5 to 3.

    End result: Ryzen 7 = 2700/X, Ryzen 5 = 2600/X, Ryzen 3 = 2500X/2400G, Ryzen 1 = 2300X/2200G.
    Reply
  • silverblue - Tuesday, February 12, 2019 - link

    Not really, given that the Ryzen 5 1400 and Ryzen 5 1500X are 4C/8T parts from just after the initial Ryzen launch, so in essence it was messed up to begin with. Also, if we're splitting hairs, Intel used to have HT in its i3 and i7 CPUs... Reply
  • Smell This - Tuesday, February 12, 2019 - link

    Yeah.
    Chipzilla's naming scheme and product stack is The Greatest . . . (rolling eyes)
    Reply
  • The_Assimilator - Tuesday, February 12, 2019 - link

    We don't talk about Intel's lineup and naming scheme... or lack thereof. Down that path lies madness. Reply

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