Windows Subsystem for Linux

The developer reaction to Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) has been quite good, and Microsoft continues to update it with pretty much every release of Windows 10. There’s some really great functionality with this update which should improve the experience even further.

Distros

There’s now additional Linux distros available in the Microsoft Store. If you are an Ubuntu fan, version 18.04 is now available, and Microsoft has a guide on how to update to the latest version. Also, Ubuntu 18.04 can be run on ARM devices, which is interesting.

There’s also WLinux, OpenSUSE 15, and SLES 15 available in the store now.

Microsoft has also added the ability to install WSL distros right from the command line, which should make setting up a new dev machine quite a bit easier.

Notepad

Announced at Build to much fanfare, Microsoft has updated Notepad to support Linux line endings, which means you can use Notepad to open files from Unix/Linux, macOS, or Windows.

Shift Right Click Menu

If you’ve ever been in explorer and thought wouldn’t it be great to be able to launch a Linux shell from right here, today is your lucky day. The shift right click menu will now have entry to launch a Linux shell here, which will open your default WSL distro to that path, much like the existing PowerShell option did already.

Improved Per-Directory Case Sensitivity Support

Case sensitivity is now off by default on new directories created in WSL, which fixes an issue introduced previously when new directories were created in WSL which would then not work well in Windows where applications expected the directory to be non-case sensitive. You can switch directories back and forth with the setfattr command as needed. If this has been a pain point for you, check out Microsoft’s blog on the topic.

Copy and Paste

With the latest update, there’s a new option in the console option window to allow copy and paste from the keyboard shortcuts of Ctrl + Shift + C and V.

Shell Updates and More Edge Updates
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  • Brett Howse - Wednesday, November 14, 2018 - link

    Yes this is off by default and configurable. Reply
  • DominionSeraph - Wednesday, November 14, 2018 - link

    Calling the data loss a software bug isn't really accurate. After the users moved their user directories, the old ones should've been unused and ready for cleanup. Some users continued to stuff files into the old locations as well as the new ones, causing the ones in the old location to be deleted when the cleanup occurred. This isn't a bug, just the convergence between design choice and a fraction of the user base's use.

    If Microsoft made a smartphone with buttons on both sides of the case, decided in a refresh to switch it to right-side only, and people came out of the woodwork saying, "I masturbate with my right hand so those buttons on the left were useful," and Microsoft added them back in, is that saying that all smartphones that only have buttons on the right side are bugged?
    If we're calling design choices bugs then MacOS is literally nothing but a bug for its lack of legacy support.
    Reply
  • timecop1818 - Wednesday, November 14, 2018 - link

    Yep, 100% this. After i researched the data "loss" conditions, I was surprised it was called such a big deal.

    I actually DO move Known Folders to another drive due to space/management reasons, and i would never think to continue using users\documens etc locations for other files after the move.

    There's not even a quick way to access those after transfer is there? the documents explorer pin will go to new location, and you'd need to drill down to c:\users\username\documents to get to old place manually. so if anyone lost data after knowingly moving Known Folder and continuing to use old one, it's 100% their fault and not Microsofts.
    Reply
  • GreenReaper - Thursday, November 15, 2018 - link

    No, it's fair to call it a bug, because the assumption (the directories are empty, or contain no valuable data, so it's safe to remove them) was incorrect. This may have been partially the fault of third-parties not handling shell paths correctly, but the fact remains: Microsoft was the one to delete user data. Reply
  • timecop1818 - Thursday, November 15, 2018 - link

    No, user moved their data to another location. That was the end of microsoft involvement.

    If you use lunix and store shit in /tmp and it disappears on reboot, do you blame lunix or yourself?
    Reply
  • bill44 - Wednesday, November 14, 2018 - link

    After 3 years and lots of promises, proper color management has yet to be implemented. Reply
  • ayunatsume - Friday, November 16, 2018 - link

    Windows has had color management since... Windows XP? You can find it in the control panel and you can install ICC profiles by double-clicking them. I work in a printing press and use CM for RGB and CMYK jobs. I use it with Adobe's suite of programs from acrobat to photoshop, illustrator, and indesign. What were you looking for in color management? Reply
  • pjcamp - Wednesday, November 14, 2018 - link

    I'll wait a month to see if anything else surfaces. Luckily, I know how to disable forced updates. This is exactly the sort of catastrophe I feared from that policy. Reply
  • leexgx - Friday, November 16, 2018 - link

    windows 10 pro set to none targeted +100 days delay (+15 delay on normal updates as you cant even trust them as they have pulled them in the past when a broken update has broken PCs) Reply
  • Makaveli - Wednesday, November 14, 2018 - link

    This build finally works for me as an in place upgrade on my Sony Vaio Z laptop 1803 would fail every time. Which means I can upgrade my main desktop tomorrow. Reply

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