The gaming laptop segment is one of the most profitable around, and MSI has focused their laptops almost exclusively on this market for the last couple of years. Today we are taking a look at the MSI GT75 Titan, otherwise affectionately known as the GT75 Titan-093. The GT lineup is the top of the range for MSI, and the GT75 Titan offers all the accoutrements you’d be expecting in a gaming laptop.

MSI continuously updates their GT lineup with the latest equipment, and for the 17.3-inch GT75 they’ve moved exclusively to the hex-core Intel Coffee Lake lineup, with the Core i7-8750H, Core i7-8850H, and Core i9-8950HK options. These are all 45-Watt CPUs, but the Core i9 offers overclocking in addition to a higher base and boost frequency at stock speeds.

GPU options are all NVIDIA. AMD doesn’t offer Vega in any sort of laptop form factor at the moment, so for now, NVIDIA has this market all to themselves. The GT75 can be had with a GTX 1070, GTX 1070 SLI, or GTX 1080.

There’s lots of storage options, starting with just a 1 TB 7200 rpm drive, and then adding in SSDs for the boot drive, with either a 256 GB SATA, 512 GB SATA, or 512 GB NVMe or dual 512 GB NVMe in RAID on the higher models. If you want to add your own storage, the laptop offers 3 M.2 slots so you can mix and match flash storage.

The low-end models come with a single SODIMM of 16 GB DDR4-2400, and the high-end models come with 2x16 GB DDR4-2667. Since this is a gaming laptop, it does of course offer SODIMM slots, so you can add more RAM after purchase, unlike an Ultrabook. There are four slots, so the laptop could handle up to 64 GB of DDR4.

MSI GT75 Titan
Component GT75 TITAN-058 GT75 TITAN-055 GT75 TITAN-056 GT75 TITAN-094 GT75 TITAN-093
(Model Tested)
GT75 TITAN-04K-071
CPU Intel Core i7-8750H
6 Core, 12 Thread
2.2 - 4.1 GHz
9MB Cache, 45W TDP
Intel Core i7-8850H
6 Core, 12 Thread
2.6 - 4.3 GHz
9MB Cache, 45W TDP
Intel Core i9-8950HK
6 Core, 12 Thread
2.9 - 4.8 GHz
12MB Cache, 45W TDP
GPU NVIDIA GTX 1080
2560 CUDA Cores, 160 TU, 64 ROPs
1556-1733MHz
10 Gbps GDDR5X 256-bit 8GB
RAM 16GB DDR4 2400 x 1
4 SODIMM Slots 64 GB Max
16GB DDR4 2666 x 1
4 SODIMM Slots 64 GB Max
16GB DDR4 2666 x 2
4 SODIMM Slots 64 GB Max
Display 17.3" 1920x1080 120Hz TN
170° viewing angle sRGB
17.3" 3840x2160 60Hz IPS
Adobe RGB
Storage 256GB M.2 SATA
1 TB 7200rpm
3 M.2 slots
512GB M.2 SATA
1 TB 7200rpm
3 M.2 slots
1 TB 7200rpm
3 M.2 slots
512GB M.2 NVMe
1 TB 7200rpm
3 M.2 slots
512GB M.2 NVMe x 2 (1TB RAID)
1 TB 7200rpm
3 M.2 slots
Network Killer Gigabit Ethernet
Killer Wireless-AC 1550 2x2:2
Bluetooth 5.0
Aquantia 10Gbps Ethernet
Killer Wireless-AC 1550 2x2:2
Bluetooth 5.0
I/O USB 3.1 Gen2 Type-A x 5
USB-C Thunderbolt 3 x 1>br />SDXC
mini DisplayPort 1.2
HDMI 2.0
Keyboard SteelSeries Mechanical Per-Key RGB with Anti-Ghost
Audio ESS Sabre HiFi DAC
3.5mm Headphone, Mic, Line In, Line Out
Dynaudio Tech Speakers
3W Stereo + 5W Subwoofer
Battery 8 cell 75Wh Li-Ion 8 cell 90Wh Li-Ion
AC Adapter 330W 330W 2 x 230W
Dimensions 428 x 314 x 57.9 mm
16.85 x 12.36 x 2.28 inches
Weight 4.56 kg
10.05 lbs
4.50 kg
9.92 lbs
4.56 kg
10.05 lbs
MSRP $2,799 $2,999 $2,799 $3,299 $3,999 $4,499

As you can see, there's quite a few different models available depending on what channel you end up purchasing from, and of course the third party resellers of MSI will likely be able to customize further. There's also a single model called the GT75 Titan-057 which comes with a GTX 1070, and costs $2,399 that's not in the above table in order to prevent it becoming even more complicated.

MSI offers two display choices, with a 120 Hz 1920x1080 TN panel, or a 3840x2160 60 Hz IPS option with 100% Adobe RGB gamut support. Both displays offer G-SYNC functionality as well.

Finally, there’s plenty of inputs, with five USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-A ports, a USB-C Thunderbolt 3 port, and an SD card slot. There are also four 3.5 mm audio jacks, a Killer Wireless-AC 1550 802.11ac 2x2 network card, and, the first laptop we’ve reviewed with a 10 Gigabit Aquantia Ethernet port.

But wait – there’s more. MSI has outfitted the GT75 with a fully mechanical keyboard from SteelSeries, with per-key RGB lighting.

Yes it’s big. Yes the bezels are large. Yes it weighs just over 10 lbs. But this system is designed for performance, not actually sitting in one's lap, so we’ll have to see how it does with its primary function. But first, let’s go over the design.

Design
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  • bennyg - Friday, September 14, 2018 - link

    You'd think that, but all the high end DTRs have pretty similar jet turbines under load reaching above 55dBa, because they're all set to turbo themselves as high as they'll go, which is almost always limited by cooling. Idle and part load noise is a tradeoff between temps and noise up to the user via fan control schemes Reply
  • RSAUser - Saturday, September 15, 2018 - link

    You can set them all to be adaptive/set to screen resolution.
    Nvidia control panel > Manage 3D settings > Power management mode to adaptive.
    It's one of the first changes I make on any Nvidia or AMD card, what's the point in pushing twice the amount of frames needed, I'd rather use less power and have the fan quieter.
    Reply
  • PeachNCream - Thursday, September 13, 2018 - link

    For a gaming laptop, it doesn't look overly obnoxious. Maybe OEMs are finally starting to back off from the excessive bling...one can hope anyway. Is it possible to install vanilla Intel drivers instead of Killer-branded ones and still end up with a working wireless adapter? The best solution would be for MSI to use an Intel WiFi NIC to begin with, but if the end user can still escape Killer software without opening the laptop up to replace the NIC, that'd be a second place alternative to fixing that particular hardware glitch. Reply
  • GreenReaper - Thursday, September 13, 2018 - link

    A laptop that destroys your lap, the competition, and your bank balance all at once! Reply
  • ElvenLemming - Thursday, September 13, 2018 - link

    Is there a mistake in the spec table for GPU? There are two sections but the same 1080 information is in both. Reply
  • DanNeely - Thursday, September 13, 2018 - link

    Not sure, could be there was a 1070 model in the middle that was dropped for space reasons. Just looking on Amazon there're more models than the ones that could be crammed into the table here. Reply
  • Brett Howse - Thursday, September 13, 2018 - link

    No mistake - they just have a lot of different models and there's not necessarily any sequential order for the components. Reply
  • DanNeely - Thursday, September 13, 2018 - link

    Brett, you're missing the point. If all the laptops in the table are 1080's then you only need a single full width cell for the GPU row, not two cells each with the same stats. Reply
  • Brett Howse - Thursday, September 13, 2018 - link

    Oh I see the issue. Someone deleted one row from my carefully crafted table. There's supposed to be one model with the GTX 1070. I'll fix it up. Reply
  • RedNeon - Friday, September 14, 2018 - link

    Except that there already is a laptop with AMD Vega 56 GPU, the Acer Predator Helios 500. Reply

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