Despite virtually everything in the consumer world being unnecessarily stuffed to the gills with RGB LEDs, they seem to sell like hotcakes. I was told earlier this year by one company that when they added RGBs to their most popular product, it outsold the non-RGB version 6:1 in the following six months. If you like it or loathe it, RGB is here to stay. But not all RGB-equipped devices have to be a dire shade of color.

Enter G.Skill’s Trident Royal memory. This product was easily one of the stars of Computex, despite still only being a prototype. Most modern DDR4 memory today with LEDs use a top bar above the memory PCB with some form of plastic diffuser, akin to a stage light, in order to get a softer glow from a very bright LED. What G.Skill has done is implement a crystalline like diffuser cap to its memory, taking advantage of photon reflections as much as diffraction.

The best way to describe it is that this memory belongs in a jewellery shop. It was presented on a spinning plinth, and the crystalline cap on the memory adds that a level of feeling expensive that normally comes with expensive gemstones or a decent Swarovski trinket. The crystalline looking cap is likely some form of molded plastic, as with other caps, however it is as transparent as it needs to be, both hiding the LEDs but also creating a uniform color intensity across the module.

G.Skill were asking for feedback at the show, and it makes sense that they should reserve this treatment for their high-end or high-capacity multi-module kits. The only downside is that unlike G.Skill’s current memory, it doesn’t have a name directly on the top to identify the brand, however as of yet they are the only company putting on a demo with this.

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  • FreckledTrout - Thursday, June 14, 2018 - link

    I like where you are going. I also wouldn't mind having RGB to help show where to connect cables and if the connection is good etc. Like for example light blue light inside the USB ports, would help find them to plug up to and they could change from light blue to green light once a connection occurs. Or color coded lights for the audio ports to help identify what plugs into what port. Reply
  • Reflex - Thursday, June 14, 2018 - link

    My god, making LED's useful for diagnostics rather than decorative? What is wrong with you man?? :p Reply
  • Doc Rob - Thursday, June 14, 2018 - link

    OH forgot the RGB on the motherboard other then maybe looks is pointless.. it does not change with the temps like my CPU and CPU coolers do. Reply
  • peevee - Thursday, June 14, 2018 - link

    "I was told earlier this year by one company that when they added RGBs to their most popular product, it outsold the non-RGB version 6:1 in the following six months"

    Either IQ of the modern geeks goes sharply down, or it is Chinese market.
    Reply
  • JeffFlanagan - Thursday, June 14, 2018 - link

    These gaudy caps look like they'll trap heat. Reply
  • Pork@III - Thursday, June 14, 2018 - link

    Fuck RGB! I'll stay with the old basket for as long as I need it, and I do not want to buy a new computer, while any component still has a RGB backlight Reply
  • shabby - Thursday, June 14, 2018 - link

    Oh i get it... they're catering to girl gamers, that must be it. Reply
  • piroroadkill - Friday, June 15, 2018 - link

    Making something more and more gaudy is not exactly innovation. Where's the real news? Reply
  • smilingcrow - Friday, June 15, 2018 - link

    Needs more cowbell and less bling. Reply
  • TheWereCat - Friday, June 15, 2018 - link

    Waiting for Rolex CPU clocks Reply

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