Benchmarking Performance: CPU Office Tests

The office programs we use for benchmarking aren't specific programs per-se, but industry standard tests that hold weight with professionals. The goal of these tests is to use an array of software and techniques that a typical office user might encounter, such as video conferencing, document editing, architectural modelling, and so on and so forth.

All of our benchmark results can also be found in our benchmark engine, Bench.

Chromium Compile (v56)

Our new compilation test uses Windows 10 Pro, VS Community 2015.3 with the Win10 SDK to combile a nightly build of Chromium. We've fixed the test for a build in late March 2017, and we run a fresh full compile in our test. Compilation is the typical example given of a variable threaded workload - some of the compile and linking is linear, whereas other parts are multithreaded.

Office: Chromium Compile (v56)

This is another case where I think our improvised testbed is playing a bigger part, and I'd like to eventually re-run this on my standard testbed. Especially as compiling heavily hits more than just the CPU.

GeekBench4: link

Due to numerous requests, GeekBench 4 is now part of our suite. GB4 is a synthetic test using algorithms often seen in high-performance workloads along with a series of memory focused tests. GB4’s biggest asset is a single-number output which its users seem to love, although it is not always easy to translate that number into real-world performance comparisons.

Office: Geekbench 4 - Single Threaded Score (Overall)

Office: Geekbench 4 - MultiThreaded Score (Overall)

Like CineBench, the Core i7-8086K does will on the synthetic single threaded test.

PCMark8: link

Despite originally coming out in 2008/2009, Futuremark has maintained PCMark8 to remain relevant in 2017. On the scale of complicated tasks, PCMark focuses more on the low-to-mid range of professional workloads, making it a good indicator for what people consider 'office' work. We run the benchmark from the commandline in 'conventional' mode, meaning C++ over OpenCL, to remove the graphics card from the equation and focus purely on the CPU. PCMark8 offers Home, Work and Creative workloads, with some software tests shared and others unique to each benchmark set.

Office: PCMark8 Home (non-OpenCL)

Here the 8086K does eek out a win over the 8700K, although just barely.

Benchmarking Performance: CPU Encoding Tests Benchmarking Performance: CPU Legacy Tests
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  • SanX - Tuesday, June 12, 2018 - link

    They aren't making that much profit off each chip? If they aren't making huge profits then all mobile chip factories lose money by selling the same transistor count processors like the one in Apple or Samsung phones for just $25 Reply
  • Hxx - Thursday, June 14, 2018 - link

    who said binned chips? that would imply added costs. Did intel make some official statement? There is now way the 8086ks are binned chips. Intel clocked the 4.7ghz core to 5ghz on a 8700k. That's doable on any cooler you dont need a binned chip for that. Perhaps additional testing was done to make sure they're stable but there is no way intel cherry picked these chips. Reply
  • AutomaticTaco - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    Okay. So people make purchases. So be it. If it's not better you can purchase something else. And others can make up their own minds. Reply
  • LemmingOverlord - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    No real explanation why the 8086K underperforms the 8700K in multithreaded CPU tests, then. Considering they are rated the same at more than dual-core usage I can't really understand.

    Utter waste of money, that's for sure
    Reply
  • Ryan Smith - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    As noted in the testbed section, this wasn't run on our standard testbed since Ian didn't have it with him in Taiwan. Every motherboard is different, sometimes infuriatingly so. Reply
  • npz - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    DPC latency? Speedstep / clookspeed ramp up differences? Reply
  • Ryan Smith - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    They all tend to implement uncore clocking differently, even among different products within the same manufacturer. Reply
  • AsParallel - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    Because ASRock and configuration. ASRock boards are a pain to dial in, and sometimes their firmware is an immovable object. Reply
  • artifex - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    Waiting for the i7-80286K, so I can hit the turbo button Reply
  • TheinsanegamerN - Monday, June 18, 2018 - link

    I'm waiting for the AMD 5x86 4700x that will slot into an intel motherboard. Reply

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