Rocket League

Hilariously simple pick-up-and-play games are great fun. I'm a massive fan of the Katamari franchise for that reason — passing start on a controller and rolling around, picking up things to get bigger, is extremely simple. Until we get a PC version of Katamari that I can benchmark, we'll focus on Rocket League.

Rocket League combines the elements of pick-up-and-play, allowing users to jump into a game with other people (or bots) to play football with cars with zero rules. The title is built on Unreal Engine 3, which is somewhat old at this point, but it allows users to run the game on super-low-end systems while still taxing the big ones. Since the release in 2015, it has sold over 5 million copies and seems to be a fixture at LANs and game shows. Users who train get very serious, playing in teams and leagues with very few settings to configure, and everyone is on the same level. Rocket League is quickly becoming one of the favored titles for e-sports tournaments, especially when e-sports contests can be viewed directly from the game interface.

Based on these factors, plus the fact that it is an extremely fun title to load and play, we set out to find the best way to benchmark it. Unfortunately for the most part automatic benchmark modes for games are few and far between. Partly because of this, but also on the basis that it is built on the Unreal 3 engine, Rocket League does not have a benchmark mode. In this case, we have to develop a consistent run and record the frame rate.

Read our initial analysis on our Rocket League benchmark on low-end graphics here.

With Rocket League, there is no benchmark mode, so we have to perform a series of automated actions, similar to a racing game having a fixed number of laps. We take the following approach: Using Fraps to record the time taken to show each frame (and the overall frame rates), we use an automation tool to set up a consistent 4v4 bot match on easy, with the system applying a series of inputs throughout the run, such as switching camera angles and driving around.

It turns out that this method is nicely indicative of a real bot match, driving up walls, boosting and even putting in the odd assist, save and/or goal, as weird as that sounds for an automated set of commands. To maintain consistency, the commands we apply are not random but time-fixed, and we also keep the map the same (Aquadome, known to be a tough map for GPUs due to water/transparency) and the car customization constant. We start recording just after a match starts, and record for 4 minutes of game time (think 5 laps of a DIRT: Rally benchmark), with average frame rates, 99th percentile and frame times all provided.

The graphics settings for Rocket League come in four broad, generic settings: Low, Medium, High and High FXAA. There are advanced settings in place for shadows and details; however, for these tests, we keep to the generic settings. For both 1920x1080 and 4K resolutions, we test at the High preset with an unlimited frame cap.

All of our benchmark results can also be found in our benchmark engine, Bench.

ASRock RX 580 Performance

Rocket League (1080p, Ultra)
Rocket League (1080p, Ultra)

GPU Tests: Rise of the Tomb Raider GPU Tests: Grand Theft Auto V
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  • bigboxes - Tuesday, June 12, 2018 - link

    I run to my 4790K to check for HSF. Who would have thought it had one in the box. No one buys that processor to use the stock HSF. Reply
  • mkaibear - Tuesday, June 12, 2018 - link

    I did. Worked fine. Reply
  • Marlin1975 - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    My 3570k came with a heatsink.

    Also in the AMD Ryzen reviews here it was pointed out there was no heatsink for the unlocked/higher chips. Yet in this review it was not and they did not use a regular/more common heatsink, but a very costly and less used water cooler.
    Reply
  • npz - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    Ok fair enogh, but the stock heatsink & fan Intel uses are crap so I don't think reviewers should be using them for actual benchmarks anyways as it will affect turbo speeds. Reply
  • Marlin1975 - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    That's the point. You use what they give to show its real performance. If it has a negative affect that is on the maker, not the user/reviewer.

    That way when you compare different CPUs they all have the same standard cooler so its apples to apples review.
    Reply
  • Inteli - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    Surely if you want to compare CPUs apples to apples, you'd want to use the same cooler for all of them (across brands, not just within), so the CPU is what's actually being tested. Why would only a stock cooler give "real performance" anyways? Are you saying the CLC on my 4690k is giving me "fake performance"?

    Not that it matters, because Intel didn't include a stock heat sink with this CPU.

    I would rather see CPUs hooked up to an absolutely overkill cooling setup (maybe a water chiller? :^) ) on stock clocks so the CPU can perform its absolute best.
    Reply
  • npz - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    It's real performance is with an aftermarket heatsink anyways which is why Intel stopped providing them for the K series after Haswell. As long as you use a cooler which will not impede the performance of the cpu, then the cpu benchmarks are all apples to apples comparison. It was so bad it would cause the cpus to throttle with certain heavy loads and you can forget about overclocking, which kills the point of the K-series.

    It will be an absolute disservice if Anandtech benchmarked with the stock heatsink. The only exception is Ryzen, especially Ryzen 2's wraith max heatsink which rivals high end aftermarket cooling
    Reply
  • cmdrdredd - Monday, June 11, 2018 - link

    ok but in the real world nobody is buying a K series CPU and running it stock. Reply
  • mkaibear - Tuesday, June 12, 2018 - link

    I do! (I intended to downclock it but it didn't downclock very well so I just left it at defaults. Stock cooler too - 2500K then 4790K) Reply
  • MDD1963 - Tuesday, June 26, 2018 - link

    Untrue, if the CPU is already at fairly high temps stock, going 10-15C higher in temps to gain 100 more MHz and 2 more FPS in a game seems ludicrous.... Reply

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