Today Motorola announced six new mid-range and low-end phones in the g6 and e5 series. The G series has been particularly popular in regions such as North America due to its excellent value proposition and being overall solid phones. The g6 promises to continue this trend while bringing to market some of the more popular features of today’s high-end flagships, such as 18:9 displays and dual-camera functionality.

The new g6 and e5 series each come in three variants: A regular variant in a “smaller” form-factor, a “plus” variant with a larger screen which will be available only in select markets, and a cost-reduced and “play” variant which could be counted as a completely different phone model with low-end specifications.

Motorola Moto g6 variants
  Moto g6 Moto g6 plus Moto g6 play
SoC Snapdragon 450
8x A53 @ 1.8GHz 
Adreno 506
Snapdragon 630
8x A53 @ 2.2GHz 
Adreno 508
Snapdragon 430
4x A53 @ 1.4GHz
Adreno 505
Display 5.7" 2160x1080 (18:9)
IPS LCD
5.9" 2160x1080 (18:9)
IPS LCD
5.7" 1440x720 (18:9)
IPS LCD
Dimensions 153.8 x 72.3 x 8.3 mm
167 grams
160 x 75.5 x 8.0 mm
167 grams
155.4 x 72.2 x 9.1 mm
180 grams
RAM 3/4GB 4/6GB 2/3GB
NAND 32/64GB 
+ microSD
64GB 
+ microSD
16/32GB 
+ microSD
Battery 3000 mAh (11.55Wh)
non-replaceable
3200 mAh (12.32Wh)
non-replaceable
4000 mAh (15.4Wh)
non-replaceable
Front
Camera
8MP 5MP
Primary
Rear Camera
12MP, dual-pixel PDAF sensor
F/1.7 lens
13MP
PDAF sensor
Secondary
Rear Camera
5MP -
SIM Size NanoSIM
(Dual-SIM in some markets)
NanoSIM
Wireless 802.11a/b/g/n/ac 2x2 MU-MIMO, BT 5.0 LE,
NFC, GPS/Glonass/Galileo/BDS
802.11a/b/g/n,
BT 4.2, GPS/Glonass
Connectivity USB Type-C
3.5mm headset
microUSB
3.5mm headset
Features Fingerprint reader, face unlock, Moto Key Fingerprint reader,
Moto Key
Launch OS Android 8.0
Launch Price USD $249 EUR 299€ USD $199

The g6 and g6 plus are powered by respectively a Snapdragon 450 and Snapdragon 630 which uses 8x Cortex A53 at up to 1.8 and 2.2GHz, so this is a mid-end device in terms of specifications and performance. The g6 and g6 plus come with respectively 3/4 or 4/6GB or RAM depending on the SKU. The g6 play comes with an even lower end Snapdragon 427 which contains 4x A53’s at 1.4GHz.


Moto g6

The defining factor for the phones are the 18:9 screens. The g6 and g6 plus use a 2160x1080p screen, with the smaller variant coming in at 5.7” and the larger plus coming in at 5.9”. Obviously there’s a bit of disconnect between screen diameter and actual device size with these new elongated aspect ratios, so the widths of 72.3 and 75.5mm should be more representative of the in-hand size of the devices. The g6 play also comes with a 5.7” screen, however it uses a lower 1440x720 resolution screen.


Moto g6 plus

On the battery side the g6 and g6 plus come with 3000 and 3200mAh batteries. The g6 play uses a larger 4000mAh battery, however this comes at a cost of device thickness as well as increased weight.

The g6 and g6 plus use a dual-camera system with the main shooter coming in at 12MP. On the g6 this is accompanied by an F/1.8 lens while the plus gets a F/1.7 lens. The secondary 5MP sensor serves for depth information and bokeh effects.

The g6 launches in all major western markets, while the plus variant won’t be launched in the US and will remain exclusive to European, Asian and other select markets. The prices here for the G6 comes at USD $249. The g6 plus comes at EUR 299€ (including taxes). The g6 play comes at a lower price point of USD $199 and also launches in all major markets.

Alongside the g6 series, the e5 series represent a lower price point with more conservative specifications.

Motorola Moto e5 variants
  Moto e5 Moto e5 plus Moto e5 play
SoC Qualcomm Snapdragon 425
4x Cortex A53 @ 1.4GHz
Qualcomm Snapdragon 425/427
4x Cortex A53 @ 1.4GHz
Display 5.7" 1440x720 (18:9)
IPS LCD
6.0" 1440x720 (18:9)
IPS LCD
5.2" 1280x720
LCD
Dimensions 154.4 × 72.2 × 8.95 mm
174 grams
161.9 x 75.3 x 9.35 mm
200 grams
151 x 74 x 8.85 mm
150 grams
RAM 2GB 3GB 2GB
NAND 16GB 
+ microSD
32GB 
+ microSD
16GB 
+ microSD
Battery 4000 mAh (15.4Wh)
non-replaceable
5000 mAh (19.25Wh)
non-replaceable
2800 mAh (10.78Wh)
non-replaceable
Front
Camera
8MP 5MP
Primary
Rear Camera
13MP, 1.12µm pixels PDAF sensor
F/2.0 lens
12MP, 1.25µm pixels PDAF sensor
F/2.0 lens

Laser AF
8MP 1.12µm pixels
F/2.0 lens
Secondary
Rear Camera
5MP 5MP
SIM Size NanoSIM
(Dual-SIM in some markets)
NanoSIM
Wireless 802.11a/b/g/n/ac 2x2 MU-MIMO, BT 5.0 LE,
NFC, GPS/Glonass/Galileo/BDS
802.11a/b/g/n,
BT 4.2, GPS/Glonass
Connectivity microUSB
3.5mm headset
Features Fingerprint reader -
Launch OS Android 8.0
Launch Price USD $199 EUR 169€ TBD

All variants of the e5 are powered by the very low-end Snapdragon 425 which comes with 4x Cortex A53 cores at 1.4GHz. The regular and play variants sport 2GB of RAM, while the plus variant comes with 3GB. Storage is limited to 16GB as well for the smaller variants while the plus gets 32GB.

The e5 and e5 plus both also use 18:9 aspect ratio screens at 1440x720 resolution, while the play variant remains a more traditional 16:9 ratio, also at 720p.

The e5 and e5 plus sport some extremely large batteries coming in at a hefty 4000 and 5000mAh. The large battery sizes mean that both phones are relatively heavy, with the e5 plus coming in at a total of 200g.

On the camera side, we’re just expecting the bare minimum as Motorola opted for 13 respectively 12MP sensors on the e5 and e5 plus. The e5 play comes with a smaller 8MP camera. All variants sport F/2.0 lenses.

The market availability of the e5’s follows that of the g6 – meaning the e5 plus variant doesn’t see a launch in North America. This variant comes in at EUR 169€, while the globally launched e5 comes at USD $199. There hasn’t been price announcements for the e5 play yet.

Overall Motorola’s new phones offer solid value at their respective price points. In the past what Motorola was able to distinguish itself with was very up to date and streamlined software experience. The new g6 and e5 series all launch with Android 8.0 out of the box so it seems that Motorola’s strategy in terms of software hasn’t changed.

Update: There was confusion regarding the SoC specifications - the article was updated accordingly based on listed specifications from Motorola

Source: Motorola Blog

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  • theorland - Friday, April 20, 2018 - link

    snapdragon 450 = rebranding of 625, nuff said Reply
  • syxbit - Thursday, April 19, 2018 - link

    "Overall Motorola’s new phones offer solid value at their respective price points."
    Not sure how you can say that with a straight face.
    the Moto G was great for it's first gen. But they're been using Arm Cortex A53 CPUs for like 3-4 generations. It's a disgrace
    Reply
  • agoyal - Thursday, April 19, 2018 - link

    It is "solid disappointment"....how can the specs be worse than last generation?? They should learn something from redmi note 5 Plus Reply
  • PeachNCream - Thursday, April 19, 2018 - link

    When someone in the US can walk into a retail store like WalMart and drop less than $50 on an Android, it's hard to see how the term "low-end" can be applied to a handset with a $200 price tag. I'm not sure how anyone can make a claim like that with a straight face. Reply
  • Flunk - Thursday, April 19, 2018 - link

    The $50 phones are more trashcan phones than low end. As in, they're only fit for throwing in the trash can. Reply
  • Marlin1975 - Friday, April 20, 2018 - link

    I have a Moto E4 that was $50 new and works great.

    I agree there are many left over cheap phones but if you look you can find decent phones that are cheap.

    Of course that makes me disappointed in the chipsets used in these phones. I thought the e5 would have the 450 and the G6 would start at the 630 and go up.
    Reply
  • PeachNCream - Monday, April 23, 2018 - link

    I've had my current phone, an Alcatel Pixi, for over a year. It was $30 and it's been a dependable, useful device that's let me leave my laptop at home for nearly all of my traveling. I have no intention of even considering a replacement for at least another year. My previous phone was an LG Sunrise that costed $10 new. It's still working fine on my desk's phone holder arm paired up with a bluetooth keyboard and touchpad. I use it as an MP3 player and computer companion so I don't have to Alt+Tab as often. In fact, I often go a week or more without turning on my PC because either one can fill my computing and entertainment needs which can involve hours of video playback, extensive writing, research, communication and whatnot. A phone that costs more doesn't generally offer the cost multiple in added value (say 4x the price doesn't mean 4x the functionality for instance) so aside from emotionally-driven desires, there's little reason to spend more than the bare minimum on a phone. Sub-$50 phones are far from throwaway devices, but if one fails suddenly, I can be entirely apathetic to the loss and easily find a comparably cheap replacement with minimal effort. Reply
  • crowleysimon - Thursday, April 19, 2018 - link

    According to motorola the G6 Plus has a Snapdragon 630 not 430: https://www.motorola.co.uk/products/moto-g-plus-ge... Reply
  • Marlin1975 - Friday, April 20, 2018 - link

    Their US page does not list that. But the speed suggest a 450 for the G6 in the US. Not as good as the 625/630 but much better than the old 425/427/430 chips. Reply
  • limitedaccess - Thursday, April 19, 2018 - link

    I don't think the specs listed in this article are correct. If you follow through the links on the from the source blog post the G6 Plus states it's using a Snapdragon 630 and the G6 states a 1.8ghz processor which suggests its a Snapdragon 450. Reply

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