Full Screen Application

Here are a few quick looks at some demanding full screen applications (except solitaire, which is windowed). All of these screenshots are taken with DVI inputs on the LCDs. We used a Radeon 9800 XT for testing.

The Matrix Reload, The Matrix - We include these movies into our benchmark to test full motion video. As expected, the darks were much better on the 213T, but there was still a washed out blue tone. However, compared to our 2001FP, the 213T image looks like a screenshot. Both images were taken from the same position with the same lighting. Even though the two images are dramatically different, do not put all of your faith in them as digital cameras tend to over-exaggerate visual defects.


Samsung 213T


Dell 2001FP

Magic the Gathering: Battlegrounds - We picked up a new game since our last benchmark, and in all honesty this is probably one of the better benchmarking games for an LCD; rich colors, fast motion, excessive contrast everywhere (the game is actually kind of fun to play, too). In any case, even though this is an expanded fantasy card game, MTG:B gives us a lot of opportunity to test motion blur due to its high level of activity. Motion blur was essentially non-existent; we did not experience any problems with the LCD keeping up with the rapid color changes on the screen.


Click to enlarge.

Morrowind - Another solid 1600x1200 game we like to test LCD monitors on. Unfortunately, the sky in the game should not be as blue as it shows in this picture. This is partly due to the camera, but also due to the screen. On our 2001FP the sky is the (correct) grey, but the overall image has a more washed out look to it.


Click to enlarge.

Max Payne 2 - Again one of our favorite games to benchmark LCDs because we get such different results each time we change LCDs. There is a slight blue hue to everything even though we have already calibrated our monitor with the OptiCal software. Even though there are some discrepancies in the color, the contrast levels are very good; unlike many other LCDs dark objects on dark backgrounds were difficult to distinguish. This is the desired effect in many games.


Click to enlarge.

Halo - Halo gave our 2001FP a little bit of trouble. While we did notice motion blur, the camera over emphasized the issue due to the shutter rate. For avid gamers there is a noticeable difference between the 213T and the 2001FP, but it is difficult to distinguish. The 213T cannot keep up with the 2001FP; particularly with the constant light to dark imagery (rapid explosions in dark corridors).


Click to enlarge.

Solitaire - For some reason, everyone enjoys our Solitaire benchmark. Indeed, with all that mind bending, card flipping excitement, its no wonder the most played PC game in history deserves its own benchmark.


Samsung 213T


Dell 2001FP

Unlike our other images, do not confuse these image defects with the defects in the other pictures. The "two" mouse cursors are normal; we are catching two separate frames in the same image due to the cameras shutter rate. What is not normal is the blurring along the edges of the cursor. You can clearly see how the 2001FP has a crisper cursor; the SIPS panel is more capable for this type of imagery.

On Screen Display ColorVision Spyder
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  • CaptainSpectacular - Friday, February 20, 2004 - link

    Kris,

    I believe Windows XP does not support 640x480 on any monitor without a hack of some sort. 800x600 is the new minimum resolution in Microsoft's mind. At least if you're talking about desktop resolution. Obviously games will work and are still supported at 640x480.
    Reply
  • wizardsinc - Friday, February 20, 2004 - link

    KristopherKubicki:

    The Dell 2001FP is 1600x1200 native, but the tech. sheet offers many different resolution modes - including 640x480 @ 59.9Hz, 640x480 @ 75Hz, 800x600 @75Hz, 1280x1024 @75Hz, plus many others. I'm assuming that when running in these modes, the pixels become somewhat choppy - but atleast a game that requires a monitor that supports 640x480 will still run. Have you had any trouble with the Samsung in this regard?
    Reply
  • KristopherKubicki - Friday, February 20, 2004 - link

    wizardsinc:

    I dont know if either monitor will really support 640x480 (least not on my windows xp). Which Dell LCD are you talking about? The US2000FP is also 1600x1200.

    Kristopher
    Reply
  • wizardsinc - Friday, February 20, 2004 - link

    Thanks for all the feedback! I made a typo in my original post concerning the 213T price - I realize it was $1200, not $2200 - thanks for catching it.

    It sounds like those people who have purchased a 213T are quite happy with it. There were not as many Dell responses - though the display hasn't been out for very long. It sounds like I won't be sorry with the Samsung. However, I'd like to see one of the Dell displays in person before I make a final decision.

    A new concern I have is whether or not the Samsung can auto-sync to the different resolutions required by some games - I played with one today at Fry's, and Windows XP wouldn't allow me to set the Samsung to 640 x 480, which might be a problem. I know the Dell supports a number of resolutions, including 640 x 480. Has this been an issue for anyone? Also - can anyone comment on the comparison between the Dell 2001FP and it's older 1280 x 1024 Dell counterpart? I've seen the 1280x1024 displays and they look very nice. If the 2001FP is similar, I don't think I'd be disappointed. Thanks again for the feeback!
    Reply
  • jacksandgo - Friday, February 20, 2004 - link

    I bought a 213T over a month ago after several months of checking all the available monitors. I'm an IT Manager, and use it for a little bit of everything and it's great. It's running on a Radeon 9800XT 256MB card, and the display is crisp and near perfect in my opinion. I definitely would buy it again.

    Regarding the price: You can find deals on this monitor that make it more competitive. I bought mine from CompUSA when they were running their 10% off special on almost everything. There was already a $100 rebate on the monitor, bringing it down to $1100. Another 10% off on the $1200 price brought it down to $980 after rebate plus tax.

    I used the extra $ break to buy CompUSA's 2 year guarantee that lets me walk in and swap this monitor for another one at any time during the next two years if I'm dissatisfied for any reason. Definitely worthwhile for me.

    Your mileage may differ, but for me, this monitor rocks.
    Reply
  • Souka - Friday, February 20, 2004 - link

    Boorrring.....

    Get the Grand Canyon at:

    http://www.go-l.com/monitors/grand_canyon/features...


    Reply
  • KristopherKubicki - Friday, February 20, 2004 - link

    wizardsinc: it comes down to cost; if you have the extra money to spend on the 213T you wont regret it. I did a bit of gaming on both LCDs; the 2001FP was a little easier to play on (motion blur, colors).

    You raise an interesting point though; 16ms does not directly correlate to fps. first of all the 16/25ms timings are average* - furthermore, asynchronos.

    To answer your second point; the 213T is easier on my* eyes for programming (which i do a lot of) and writing (which i also a lot of). However, i didnt think there was anything better than the 2001FP until i got the 213T. you are going to be happy with either one.

    Cheers,

    Kristopher
    Reply
  • Epyon - Friday, February 20, 2004 - link

    I just wanted to point out to wizardsinc that the price at Newegg for the 213T is $1,199.
    http://www.newegg.com/app/viewProductDesc.asp?desc...
    Reply
  • wizardsinc - Friday, February 20, 2004 - link

    I've been holding off buying an LCD panel until the 1600 x 1200's looked reasonable. I'm torn between the DELL UltraSharp 2001FP and the Samsung SyncMaster 213T. I've seen the 213T in person and was able to test it out somewhat. I love the large screen area, and the pixels seemed "softer" to the eyes than any of the other's that I compared against (the ViewSonic VP201s inparticular). After reading this review, my main problem now is this: I've decided that the Samsung has a nicer image (black levels and brightness mean a lot to me), but lacks many of the cool features of the Dell (16ms response vs 25ms response, picture-in-picture, multiple-inputs, etc.). It seems that since the Samsung has been available for over a year, and the Dell just came out a month ago, the Dell should be the more expensive of the two - but it's not. Samsung is still selling for about $2200, whereas the Dell can be had for around $850. I like the Samsung - but I don't want to pay a premium for an older model with fewer features; and I'm worried that now that the Dell is available, the Samsung will quickly drop in price - so I might benifit by waiting a month or so. Any thoughts?
    Secondly: I'm a video game programmer - which means that I'll be using this display to program most of the time (which is why softer-on-the-eyes is important), but I will also be running and testing fast-action 3D games. The review mentions that the Dell is a better "gaming" display - but I didn't see whether the Samsung sucked in this area or not. 16ms = 60fps, but the gray-to-gray timings were not apparent. Between the two, it looks like a marginal call at best, and like I said before - 90% programming with a nice black level and brightness is important. Again, any thoughts?
    Reply
  • Monkeyshine - Friday, February 20, 2004 - link

    Great review.
    I've had this monitor for the past week in my workstation setup. It replaced my secondary display, a Sony 21 inch CRT that wore out.
    I have been very impressed so far with it's clarity, brightness and design. It is wonderful for watching DVDs while I work, viewing web pages, Photoshop palettes and spreadsheets.
    I agree with the reviewer about a slight "blue push" in the color but it is a small price to pay for just an eye popper of a display. Subjectivly, I think it's better than any of the Apple cinema displays.
    Reply

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