Ryzen APU Overclocking: A Focus on Memory Support

Also part of the demonstration about the new APUs was overclocking. For a number of years, AMD has hired Sami Makkinen, a well-known former world-record holder in various overclocking categories, to help tune the overclocking on some of its processors. So despite this being an integrated graphics platform, Sami was on hand to show the day-to-day overclocking potential. I was told that liquid nitrogen overclocking might be held at a later date…

Nonetheless, we were shown the system that would be distributed to reviewers for launch day: a mini-ITX motherboard, a Ryzen 5 2400G processor, 2x8 GB of DDR4 memory, and an AMD Wraith cooler. Using the popular benchmarking tool 3DMark Fire Strike, Sami showed a 39% increase over stock performance by overclocking only the memory and the integrated graphics:

  • DDR4-2400 + 1250 MHz GPU: 2911 Points - 'stock'
  • DDR4-3200 + 1250 MHz GPU: 3322 Points (+14%)
  • DDR4-3200 + 1550 MHz GPU: 3596 Points (+24%)
  • DDR4-3600 + 1675 MHz GPU: 4048 Points (+39%)

This shows a couple of interesting data points. First, that the DRAM speed directly influences the results a lot: the 14% gain moving to DDR4-3200 and a similar gain again up to DDR-3600 means that we are still dealing with a graphics system that is memory bandwidth limited, even with only 11 compute units. The Infinity Fabric communication pathways are tied to the DRAM speed, so these would also get a speed up – when asked if it would be possible to discern how much of the speedup is due to a pure DRAM improvement and how much from the Infinity Fabric boost, I was told that AMD could do it in house, but it would be impossible for consumers to do.

However, the DRAM speed gains match up with what we have seen with previous generations of AMD APUs, but also it means that Intel’s decision to combine a Vega GPU with high-bandwidth memory is going to be the way forward in this market.

The second point that this data brings is about memory support. One of the major criticisms of AMD’s initial launch of Ryzen was the lack of high-performance memory support, due to a young firmware. AMD has stated that the Ryzen with Vega graphics line of processors have better memory support with newer firmware revisions, capable of driving higher memory speeds. This is, of course, important to APUs. Additional updates will be coming with the new X470 motherboards in Q2.

Zen Cores and Vega: Ryzen APUs for AM4 AMD Ryzen Price Drops, New Wraith Prism
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  • bcronce - Tuesday, January 9, 2018 - link

    According to research, vitamin C and zinc supplements only help if you're sorely deficient, which is extremely difficult to do for even people with a crappy fast-food or frozen dinner diet. Unless you have a diet of cane sugar, you're probably fine. Reply
  • vortmax2 - Tuesday, January 9, 2018 - link

    I usually hit the following daily: 5000 IU D3 (in it's cholecalciferol form), 500mg C (Ester-C), 700mg Omega-3 (DHA & EPA - non-synthetic), 800mg Folate (non-folic acid form) - adding the herbals when exposed to illness. Reply
  • vortmax2 - Tuesday, January 9, 2018 - link

    All Solgar brand...they seem to be one of the best based on my research. Reply
  • mode_13h - Thursday, February 1, 2018 - link

    Watch out for folate, if you're in a cancer risk group - it can accelerate tumor growth. That amount has even been show sufficient to counteract chemotherapy.

    Omega-3 should be supplemented with a B-complex, for best results (yeah, those will usually have some folate).
    Reply
  • Alexvrb - Thursday, January 11, 2018 - link

    For every study that concludes x, another concludes y. Reply
  • mode_13h - Thursday, February 1, 2018 - link

    Cute, but wrong.

    Check out examine.com. They tabulate all the studies and research for you, making informed decisions a lot easier. If you want to dive into the details, they summarize it with references. You really can't ask for a better supplement reference.
    Reply
  • FreckledTrout - Friday, February 2, 2018 - link

    I'm not a big multi fan but most everyone is deficient in Vitamin D and magnesium. Vitamin D if you are indoors a light is a big one. Magnesium is pretty much a big one for almost everyone but really good vegetarians that eat lots of veggies vs carbs. Reply
  • ckbryant - Saturday, February 3, 2018 - link

    True, every single person will test low for Vit D and also Medicare has limits for how often they will pay for the test for Vit D due to the huge fluctuations that can happen in Vit D in just as short a period of time as a week. Reply
  • StevoLincolnite - Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - link

    Or... You know. You could just get a flu vaccine. Reply
  • mode_13h - Thursday, February 1, 2018 - link

    True, and worthwhile, but they're hardly a sure thing. They rarely work even 50% of the time. Last year's was especially bad... like in the teens or single-digits. Reply

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