Energy Consumption

We tested the energy consumption of our servers for a one-minute period in several scenario. The first scenario is the point where the server under testing performs best in MySQL: the highest throughput just before the response time goes up significantly. 

To test the power usage of the FPU, we measure the power consumption when POV-Ray was using all available threads. 

SKU TDP
(on paper)
spec
Idle
Server

W
MySQL
Best Throughput
at Lowest Resp. Time (*)
(W)
POV-Ray
100% CPU load
Dual Xeon E5-2699 v4 2x145 W 106 412 425
Dual Xeon 8176  2x165W 190 300 453
Dual EPYC 7601 2x180W 151 321 327

Both the Xeon 8176 and Dual EPYC server had a few more additional components (a separate 10 GBe card for example) than the Dual Xeon E5-2699v4 system, but that does not fully explain why idle power is so much higher, especially on the Dual Xeon 8176. We lacked the time to fully investigate this, and the last two systems have relatively new firmware.

The only conclusion that we can draw so far, is that the EPYC 7601 is likely to draw more power when running integer applications, while the rather wide FP units of the Intel CPUs are real power hogs even if they do not run heavy AVX applications. To be continued...

Floating Point performance Closing Thoughts
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  • coder543 - Tuesday, July 11, 2017 - link

    Right, of course. Ryzen is a copy-and-paste of Haswell.

    Don't make me laugh.
    Reply
  • psychobriggsy - Tuesday, July 11, 2017 - link

    Indeed it is a ridiculous comment, and puts the earlier crying about the older Ubuntu and GCC into context - just an Intel Fanboy.

    In fact Intel's core architecture is older, and GCC has been tweaked a lot for it over the years - a slightly old GCC might not get the best out of Skylake, but it will get a lot. Zen is a new core, and GCC has only recently got optimisations for it.
    Reply
  • EasyListening - Wednesday, July 12, 2017 - link

    I thought he was joking, but I didn't find it funny. So dumb.... makes me sad. Reply
  • blublub - Tuesday, July 11, 2017 - link

    I kinda miss Infinity Fabric on my Haswell CPU and it seems to only have on die - so why is that missing on Haswell wehen Ryzen is an exact copy? Reply
  • blublub - Tuesday, July 11, 2017 - link

    Your actually sound similar to JuanRGA at SA Reply
  • Kevin G - Wednesday, July 12, 2017 - link

    @CajunArson The cache hierarchy is radically different between these designs as well as the port arrangement for dispatch. Scheduling on Ryzen is split between execution resources where as Intel favors a unified approach. Reply
  • bill.rookard - Tuesday, July 11, 2017 - link

    Well, that is something that could be figured out if they (anandtech) had more time with the servers. Remember, they only had a week with the AMD system, and much like many of the games and such, optimizing is a matter of run test, measure, examine results, tweak settings, rinse and repeat. Considering one of the tests took 4 hours to run, having only a week to do this testing means much of the optimization is probably left out.

    They went with a 'generic' set of relative optimizations in the interest of time, and these are the (very interesting) results.
    Reply
  • CoachAub - Wednesday, July 12, 2017 - link

    Benchmarks just need to be run on as level as a field as possible. Intel has controlled the market so long, software leans their way. Who was optimizing for Opteron chips in 2016-17? ;) Reply
  • theeldest - Tuesday, July 11, 2017 - link

    The compiler used isn't meant to be the the most optimized, but instead it's trying to be representative of actual customer workloads.

    Most customer applications in normal datacenters (not google, aws, azure, etc) are running binaries that are many years behind on optimizations.

    So, yes, they can get better performance. But using those optimizations is not representative of the market they're trying to show numbers for.
    Reply
  • CajunArson - Tuesday, July 11, 2017 - link

    That might make a tiny bit of sense if most of the benchmarks run were real-world workloads and not C-Ray or POV-Ray.

    The most real-world benchmark in the whole setup was the database benchmark.
    Reply

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