One of Samsung’s unique selling points in the Android phablet market has been the company’s S Pen. The multi-feature stylus comes with Samsung’s popular Galaxy Note line of phones, as well as the company’s tablets. Now, the pen is finally making the jump from Android devices to Windows laptops.

It will be bundled with the new Samsung Notebook 9 Pro, a laptop line the company announced this week at Computex. The 2-in-1 comes in 13.3-inch and 15-inch screen sizes and is powered by an Intel Core i7-7500U CPU.

The S Pen can sense 4,000 levels of pressure and has tilt sensitivity for drawing in any position. Furthermore, as this is a passive stylus, it doesn’t require charging. Importantly however, the S Pen won’t be limited to just Samsung software, as it is compatible with Windows Ink Workspace.

Samsung Notebook 9 Pro Series
  13-inch 15-inch
CPU Intel Core i7-7500U
(2C/4T, 2.7-3.5GHz, 4MB L3, 14nm, 15w)
Display 13.3-inch 1920x1080, Touch Screen 15.0-inch 1920x1080, Touch Screen
Memory 8GB DDR4 16GB DDR4
Storage 256GB SSD
GPU Intel HD Graphics 620 Intel HD Graphics 620 +
AMD Radeon RX 540, 2GB GDDR5
Wireless 2x2 802.11ac w/ Bluetooth 4.1
Connectivity 1 x USB 3.0 Type-C
2 x USB 3.0 Type-A
1 x HDMI
1 x 3.5mm headset
Battery 54 Wh
Dimensions 310x217x16 mm 347x239x17 mm
Weight 1.32 kg 1.72 kg

The 13-inch Notebook 9 Pro comes with 8GB of RAM and the 15-inch laptop uses 16GB. Both have 256GB of SSD storage, while the 15-inch model also comes with a discrete AMD Radeon RX 540 video card. Both screens are full HD, and Samsung claims they provide viewing angles of up to 178 degrees.

In addition, both Notebook 9 Pros can charge via USB Type-C, and other ports include 2 USB 3.0 ports, HDMI and a microSD card slot. The laptops also support Windows Hello for facial recognition login.

Unfortunately Samsung hasn’t revealed pricing information at this time, but it sounds like these laptops should be ready for the market sooner than later.

Andrew Freedman contributed to this report

Source: Samsung

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  • Santoval - Saturday, June 03, 2017 - link

    Really? Clocked how low though, at ~2 Ghz? If the 4-core mobile Coffee Lakes manage to sustain 2.8 - 3 Ghz at 15W (I still need to wait to see that, benchmarked and all, to believe that. I cannot for the life of me think how Intel could double power efficiency at the same process node, which has already been optimized to hell in Kaby Lake - maybe Intel pulled a trick like turning off the iGPU and the base clock is actually at <2.5 Ghz, which is why they only mentioned the 4 Ghz turbo clock. If that's the case the boost clock will only be able to be sustained for a few seconds at a time, aka a mere marketing trick) then AMD might be in big trouble. Reply
  • ddriver - Saturday, June 03, 2017 - link

    So you make a baseless speculation and then compare octa core to quad core, then pretend you just made a point?

    According to this:

    http://www.bitsandchips.it/recensioni/9-hardware/8...

    an 1800x undervolt and underclocked to 3 Ghz shaves off a total of more than 70 watts of power compared to stock. According to this:

    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-ryzen-7-18...

    at stock the CPU pulls 95 watts in Blender and 112 watts in the luxrender, which is pretty much a torture test.

    So I'd say that 30 watts for EIGHT cores at 3 GHz. Cut this by half and you get 15 watts for a quad core.

    800 points at CB15 is actually very good, that's marginally more than an i5 7600k - and that's kaby lake 4 cores at 3.8 Ghz.

    Having that amount of performance in 15 watts and the enabled for factor will be unprecedented.
    Reply
  • Ubiqutious - Saturday, June 03, 2017 - link

    Thank you kind internet stranger :)

    If I am reading the gpu benchmarks correctly, the 540 is a distant 2nd...unless the benchmarks are being gamed by Intel ?

    Based on all that, I will live with what I have until a Coffee Lake iteration comes about... and see if it lives up to their 'claim'

    Unless my Surface Pro 3 dies first.
    Reply
  • ied - Friday, June 02, 2017 - link

    Argh. Why do so many new machines toss thick borders along the bottom. Ugly & useless. Why not useful screen real estate?? Reply
  • TimeShifter - Saturday, June 03, 2017 - link

    Are the screens LCD or AMOLED? Reply
  • CedarWind - Saturday, June 03, 2017 - link

    They should have used the display from their Chromebook plus. 1440 resolutin and NOT the horrible 16:9 aspect ratio Reply

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