Western Digital has announced two new helium-filled hard drives targeting consumer and business NAS applications. The new WD Red and WD Red Pro HDDs increase capacity of WD’s NAS drives to 10 TB, boost their performance and also reduce their power consumption. Therefore, the new drives enable makers of NAS units to increase capacities of their products to 80 TB (or 160TB) while increasing speeds and cutting down power.

After introducing its first hermetically sealed helium-filled NAS and video-surveillance HDDs with 8 TB capacity and six platters last year, Western Digital is refreshing its Red and Purple lineups with more advanced drives offering 10 TB capacity and using seven 1.42 TB platters. The new WD Red and WD Red Pro with 10 TB capacity are based on revamped 5400 RPM and 7200 RPM HelioSeal platforms that can support a higher number of platters. The drives also feature increased areal density and 256 MB of cache, enabling ~17% higher sequential read/write performance compared to its predecessors, as well as a lower power consumption compared to previous-gen helium WD Red hard drives. Other than that, Western Digital does not really disclose the feature set of its platform for helium-filled HDDs for NAS applications.

The WD Red 10 TB drive is engineered for personal or small business NAS systems with up to eight bays, is optimized for mixed workloads and has a 5400 RPM spindle speed. By contrast, the WD Red Pro 10 TB is aimed at medium business and enterprise-class NAS systems up to 16 bays, which is why the HDD features additional protection against vibrations as well as improved random read performance due to both 7200 RPM spindle speed and firmware tuning.  Just like their predecessors, the new WD Red/WD Red Pro hard drives come with SATA 6 Gbps interface.

Comparison of Western Digital's Helium-Filled NAS HDDs
  WD Red
WD100EFAX
WD Red
WD80EFZX
WD Red Pro
WD101KFBX
WD Red Pro
WD8001FFWX
Capacity 10 TB 8 TB 10 TB 8 TB
RPM 5400 RPM 7200 RPM
Interface SATA 6 Gbps
DRAM Cache 256 MB 128 MB 256 MB 128 MB
Data Transfer Rate (host to/from drive) 210 MB/s 178 MB/s 240 MB/s 205 MB/s
MTBF 1 million hours
Rated Workload (read and write) 180 TB/year 300 TB/year
Acoustics (Seek) 29 dBA 29 dBA 36 dBA
Power Consumption Sequential read/write 5.7 W 6.4 W 5.7 W 8.3 W
Idle 2.8 W 5.7 W 2.8 W 5.2 W
Sleep 0.5 W 0.7 W 0.5 W 0.7 W
Warranty 3 Years 5 Years
Price (as of May 2017) $494 $266.25 $533 $359.99
$0.049 per GB $0.033 per GB $0.05 per GB $0.045 per GB
20 GB per $ 30 GB per $ 18.76 GB per $ 22.2 GB per $

It is interesting to note that WD has improved the power consumption of the 10TB drives over the older 8TB drives. We are asking how exactly WD is doing that, as details were not given with the press release.

The 10TB WD Red and 10TB WD Red Pro are available in the U.S. from select retailers and distributors. The WD Red 10 TB is covered by a three-year warranty and has a price tag of $494. The more advanced WD Red Pro 10 TB features a five-year warranty and has a $533 MSRP.

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Source: Western Digital

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  • xplitz - Thursday, June 22, 2017 - link

    That sounds stupid, the creator of ZFS pointed out that you don't have to use ECC for reliability, ECC is just "nice to have" not a requirement. You just wanted to say a bad thing about ZFS, I wonder what OS you use? Reply
  • spikespiegal - Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - link

    URE's aren't the main problem with RAID5. Controller faults are the main problem with RAID5. Go to any server or enterprise focused forum and note the hostility towards RAID5, and it's well deserved.

    RAID5/6 essentially encrypts your data in the form of a parity stripe with very poor data correction unless you have a really high end controller. If the controller gets too warm, or has other issues the parity stripe can get corrupted causing a cascade of data integrity issues. Since RAID 6 creates two logical parity writes this acts as a form of fault tolerance which is why RAID6 doesn't get the ire of RAID5.

    RAID 5 only had logical justification back in the 90's when a 9GB drive cost $700. Otherwise, RAID5 failures on servers is still my #1 form of data corruption. If you have't worked on enough storage to see the issue it's not my problem.
    Reply
  • cm2187 - Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - link

    If you care about your data you need a backup anyway. Then the chance of both your primary storage and your backup failing at the same time is pretty low even with 12 disks RAID. Reply
  • Sivar - Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - link

    The impression that an unrecoverable error will necessarily be corrected by any RAID controller is not necessarily an accurate one.
    In the event of an individual disk error, RAID1 may be at greater risk because the controller has no way of knowing which copy is correct. RAID5/6 can derive a data mismatch through the parity information on other drives (not that all controllers necessarily do this).
    One great thing about ZFS is that it stores checksums on parent blocks, allowing detection of data corruption regardless of the source.
    Reply
  • dawp - Monday, May 22, 2017 - link

    count me in Reply
  • edcoolio - Monday, May 22, 2017 - link

    30 GB per $ ?! Awesome.

    I never thought I would see the day. Truly unbelievable yet inevitable.
    Reply
  • cygnus1 - Monday, May 22, 2017 - link

    It is interesting to note that WD has improved the power consumption of the 10TB drives over the older 8TB drives. We are asking how exactly WD is doing that, as details were not given with the press release.


    The Helium makes all the platters easier to spin (ie use less power).
    Reply
  • helvete - Tuesday, August 22, 2017 - link

    What's the point? All of them are He-filled... Reply
  • SweeJ - Monday, May 22, 2017 - link

    "The WD Pro 10 TB drive is engineered for personal or small business NAS systems with up to eight bays, is optimized for mixed workloads and has a 5400 RPM spindle speed. By contrast, the WD Red Pro 10 TB is aimed at medium business and enterprise-class NAS systems up to 16 bays...."

    Is this a typo? Shouldn't it be "The WD Red 10TB is engineered for personal...."?
    Reply

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