Linux Performance at 3 GHz

Built around several freely available benchmarks for Linux, Linux-Bench is a project spearheaded by Patrick at ServeTheHome to streamline about a dozen of these tests in a single neat package run via a set of three commands using an Ubuntu 11.04 LiveCD. These tests include fluid dynamics used by NASA, ray-tracing, OpenSSL, molecular modeling, and a scalable data structure server for web deployments. We run Linux-Bench and have chosen to report a select few of the tests that rely on CPU and DRAM speed.

All of our benchmark results can also be found in our benchmark engine, Bench.

C-Ray: link

C-Ray is a simple ray-tracing program that focuses almost exclusively on processor performance rather than DRAM access. The test in Linux-Bench renders a heavy complex scene offering a large scalable scenario.

Linux-Bench c-ray 1.1 (Hard)

C-ray, while slowly fading in importance as a benchmark, shows a slight gain here for Kaveri despite the lack of DRAM accesses this benchmark uses. There may however still be some L2 use.

NAMD, Scalable Molecular Dynamics: link

Developed by the Theoretical and Computational Biophysics Group at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, NAMD is a set of parallel molecular dynamics codes for extreme parallelization up to and beyond 200,000 cores. The reference paper detailing NAMD has over 4000 citations, and our testing runs a small simulation where the calculation steps per unit time is the output vector.

Linux-Bench NAMD Molecular Dynamics

NAMD shows a small benefit for Kaveri here, with all three processors showing a +16% gain minimum over Trinity.

NPB, Fluid Dynamics: link

Aside from LINPACK, there are many other ways to benchmark supercomputers in terms of how effective they are for various types of mathematical processes. The NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) are a set of small programs originally designed for NASA to test their supercomputers in terms of fluid dynamics simulations, useful for airflow reactions and design.

Linux-Bench NPB Fluid Dynamics

Redis: link

Many of the online applications rely on key-value caches and data structure servers to operate. Redis is an open-source, scalable web technology with a strong developer base, but also relies heavily on memory bandwidth as well as CPU performance.

Linux-Bench Redis Memory-Key Store, 1x

Linux-Bench Redis Memory-Key Store, 10x

Linux-Bench Redis Memory-Key Store, 100x

The 2MB of L2 cache, compared to the 4MB of the other parts, hurts Carrizo here.

Performance at 3 GHz: Office Performance at 3 GHz: Legacy
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    They really shoot themselves up allowing those 15w TDP configs with their "high end" APU's. Reply
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    That was my point about AMD building their own mobile ecosystem instead of letting OEM's destroy their reputation even more with cr*aptastic offerings. Reply
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  • albert89 - Thursday, July 14, 2016 - link

    Well better late than never for Andantech, but still a great review. As for AMD's Zen, there is much to celebrate and everything they have learned from Kaveri & Carrizo will be put into Zen. But most importantly is AMD's move to 14nm. Which means most reviewers will, for the first time, be comparing apples with apples. Its been a long road for AMD but now that they are here, I can only expect that in many areas of computing they'll give Intel a run for their money and the consumer a taste of the benefits of competition. Reply
  • osxandwindows - Thursday, July 14, 2016 - link

    Yeah, right.
    Keep dreaming.
    Hehe.
    Reply
  • euskalzabe - Thursday, July 14, 2016 - link

    I'd say the most important part isn't the move to 14nm - that would've happened anyway at this point in time - but the abandonment of the Bulldozer design, finally, into a new CPU microarchitecture and adoption of Intel-like hyperthreading. That's what will shoot AMD CPUs back into competition. Reply

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