Fortron Source (FSP) is one of the oldest computer PSU manufacturers in the market, and is the OEM behind a number of rebranded products. Their designs are usually found in advanced mid-range units, such as the Be Quiet! Dark Power Pro 10 series, but FSP has also developed interesting high-wattage designs, some of which they have been selling under their own brand. To that end, today we'll be taking a closer look at one of thier first-party PSUs, the FSP Hydro G 750W.

FSP ranks their Hydro G as their premium series, albeit beneath the 80Plus Platinum certified Aurum PT units. The Hydro G series consists of three 80Plus Gold units, ranging from 650W to 850W. All three units are based on the same platform design and FSP has supplied us with the middle option, the 750W model, which should give us a good look at the quality and performance of the series. FSP is also boasting some interesting features that we are eager to examine, such as changeable side stickers, a "server grade" design and 0 dB(A) fan control.

Power specifications ( Rated @ 50 °C )
AC INPUT 100 - 240 VAC, 50 - 60 Hz
RAIL +3.3V +5V +12V +5Vsb -12V
MAX OUTPUT 25A 25A 62.5A 3.5A 0.5A
150W 750W 17.5W 6W
TOTAL 750W

Packaging and Bundle

FSP packs the Hydro G unit in a short but very sturdy cardboard box. The artwork is simple, based on a dark theme with golden edgings, with a picture of the PSU itself in the middle. The most important features of the PSU are presented on the front side of the box in the form of icons. Details may be found on its sides and rear.

Even though the Hydro G is considered a premium series by FSP, the company is supplying only the absolute basics with it. Inside the box we only found a standard AC power cable, four black mounting screws, and very basic manual/instructions leaflets. The PSU comes adorned with blue stickers, and as part of their color changing gimmick FSP also supplies sets of red and green stickers in the box to change the accent color of the PSU. The whole design of each set of stickers differs, not just the color. However it should be noted that these are true stickers rather than some kind of reusable solution, so once a sticker is applied that's it.

The modular cables of the Hydro G are "flat" ribbon-type cables, including the main 24-pin ATX cable. All of the wires and connectors are black. The number of connectors per cable is a bit unusual though. For example, one cable has four SATA connectors, another has two SATA and two Molex connectors, and two of them have two SATA, one Molex and one floppy connector each. There is no cable with just Molex connectors on it. 

FSP Hydro G 750W
Connector type Hardwired Modular
ATX 24 Pin - 1
EPS 4+4 Pin - 1
EPS 8 Pin - -
PCI-E 6+2 Pin - 4
PCI-E 8 Pin - -
SATA - 10
Molex - 6
Floppy - 2
The FSP Hydro G 750W PSU
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  • MrSpadge - Thursday, March 03, 2016 - link

    Because the PSU likes water spilled on it, I guess. Reply
  • Shadowmaster625 - Thursday, March 03, 2016 - link

    Why have "Hydro" in the name if it doesnt have any liquid coolant in it? Reply
  • Murloc - Thursday, March 03, 2016 - link

    because it sounds cool (pun intended) Reply
  • LiviuTM - Thursday, March 03, 2016 - link

    more likely from the "Hydro Dynamic bearing", I guess. Reply
  • geniekid - Friday, March 04, 2016 - link

    They should get into aftermarket cooling. "FSP Hydro Extreme - the ultimate air cooling solution." Reply
  • DanNeely - Thursday, March 03, 2016 - link

    "The number of connectors per cable is a bit unusual though. For example, one cable has four SATA connectors, another has two SATA and two Molex connectors, and two of them have two SATA, one Molex and one floppy connector each. There is no cable with just Molex connectors on it. "

    It might be unconventional, but in principle I kinda like it; much better than every cable being identical. I was wiring up a new box a few days ago, and ended up using a cable with 4 or 5 sata connectors to power a single SSD and via a sata to molex adapter the case's built in fan controller; while having to stuff the rest out of sight in the very cramped space behind the mobo. I'd probably only have put molexes on 2 of the cables though because they're getting somewhat rare. Wiring a floppy connector in at all is rather surprising; virtually nothing has used them for years.

    Also, that description adds up to 10 sata connections 4+2+2+2, not 12 as in the summary table.
    Reply
  • nagi603 - Monday, March 07, 2016 - link

    Other manufacturers have somewhat better mixes for their modular ones. My Seasonic X400 has shorter cables with only 2 sata connectors on it, and also one with 2 molex connectors. Either would have worked for you. The mixed ones of FPS are bad because in a high-power build, you plan to use a lot of sata connectors tipically, or a lot of molexes. Not both. Reply
  • rhysiam - Thursday, March 03, 2016 - link

    Thanks for the review!

    Just a suggestion, could you chart the claimed 80 Plus standard on the "Energy Conversion Efficiency" charts? I know we can look it up and compare that way, but it would be much easier to have a unit's performance and 80 Plus (Gold in this case) standard on the chart for comparison. Thanks.
    Reply
  • mauler1973 - Saturday, March 05, 2016 - link

    When I click on the newegg link for the product it goes to toms hardware site address before going to newegg. What's the deal? Reply
  • Oxford Guy - Friday, March 11, 2016 - link

    "Their designs are usually found in advanced mid-range units, such as the Be Quiet! Dark Power Pro 10 series"

    The Dark Power Pro 10 series had high-end units made by Seasonic in it, not just FSP models. They came with advanced features like a Lunpen filter and a premium fluid bearing fan. The series topped out at 1200 watts.
    Reply

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