When we look at the history of DDR3, a number of key advertising points were consistent across most of the memory manufacturers. First was high speed in terms of out of the box, and the other was high speed from overclocking. The big names all went for these records, and after we posted about Corsair’s DDR4-3400 kit a couple of days ago, G.Skill is also jumping onto the bandwagon. However, the kit is very slightly different – G.Skill is supporting 16-16-16-36 timings, compared to Corsair’s 16-18-18-40. Whether that means much in real-world usage is hard to say, but I would imagine G.Skill, given the history between the two, will also compete on price. So perhaps under $1000, which would be a big hit in anyone's build.

This 4x4 GB kit will also be flanked by a new DDR4-3200 4x4 GB kit, available at 15-15-15-35 timings, which also undercuts the competition. Both of the new kits from G.Skill are validated on the GIGABYTE X99-SOC Champion and the ASUS Rampage V Extreme.

The kits will also come with G.Skill’s Turbulence III fans to provide extra cooling. There is no date currently mentioned by G.Skill, but 'released' often means 'heading to distributors'. Given the high specifications of the kit, I would imagine only a handful are actually going on sale.

We still have a round-up of DDR4 memory kits planned in the works, from 2133 to 3200 (perhaps 3400 if we can get them), so stay tuned for that.

Source: G.Skill

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  • dulo - Thursday, January 15, 2015 - link

    So anyone can tell me why people would buy this? This is not ECC so it's home usage memory, tell me who needs 3400 MHz frequency and CL 16 for ANY home usage? In what usage they will see difrrenece between this and DDR4 2100 MHz memory ? Besides benchmarks. Reply
  • jimbo2779 - Thursday, January 15, 2015 - link

    Future APU may do. Currently APUs seem to be constrained by the memory access speed, at least the GPU side of it anyway. Reply
  • barleyguy - Thursday, January 15, 2015 - link

    I'm not sure how spending $1000 to speed up an APU instead of buying a discrete graphics card makes sense. Maybe if the price comes way down on this, or future APUs are faster than discrete cards, but neither of those things seems imminent. Reply
  • mapesdhs - Thursday, January 15, 2015 - link

    For most home uses, no, not needed, but prosumers (solo professionals) who can't afford
    XEON systems often go for the top-end of the consumer tech, and many pro tasks do respond
    quite well to higher RAM clocks, eg. AE. The high cost is less relevant if the performance gain
    is worthwhile. However, as with gaming, improving other aspects of the system can afford
    bigger speedups, but if everything else is already maxed out then it may indeed be sensible.
    But as you say, not for normal home use, though one could make the argument that 'normal
    home use' would err towards Z97, etc. anyway.

    Ian.
    Reply
  • Sushisamurai - Thursday, January 15, 2015 - link

    spot on Reply
  • Cellar Door - Thursday, January 15, 2015 - link

    Ian, do you expect these prices - $1000 for a 16GB kit to last long? Reply
  • Breit - Thursday, January 15, 2015 - link

    Maybe peace of mind knowing to own the fastest possible memory money can buy? You know its for enthusiasts and not for regular computerists right? Reply
  • stefstef - Thursday, January 15, 2015 - link

    tell me what business would need this type of memory even if it was ecc capable ? in almost every business machine is quite unspectacular standard memory (enhanced with ecc or an extra adress buffer). the speed doesnt matter, but the amount of memory really makes it. Reply
  • james007 - Friday, January 16, 2015 - link

    I need it. I design software - and need to compile massive projects often. To be most productive, and not inhibit my creativity - I prefer the box to respond as instantaneously as possible. So, I have the 8-core CPU, overclocked, the fastest M.2 drive I could get my hands on, and am looking forward to overclocking and speeding up my RAM as well. I also do solid-modeling, some video-editing, and Photoshop work. That all begs for speed - all I can get. Reply
  • semyon95 - Thursday, January 15, 2015 - link

    Finally, DDR4 kits with actually good timings. And they're not even overvolted! Reply

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