GIGABYTE’s New Products

Pictures launched of GIGABYTE’s Facebook pages this week point to at least four new models covering gaming, overclocking and connectivity. Part of GIGABYTE’s new range is its Black Editions (BK), reducing the color of the heatsinks and components to as black as possible. It is unclear if some models will solely be in BK mode or both will be offered.

First up is the next Gaming motherboard, called the G1 WIFI-BK:

At first glance users should notice the integrated air and water cooling power delivery heatsink, designed for system builders to use their own fittings. The extended heatsink seems to be masking a PLX8747 chip, which would explain the four PCIe slots and suggest x8/x8/x8/x8 operation for GPUs. Voltage check points are in the top right, along with a SATA power connector for PCIe power. The SATA ports are split with SATA Express ports, and the audio subsystem uses GIGABYTE’s OP-AMP, AMP-UP and gain switches, paired with a Creative audio codec.

For overclocking, the SOC Force:

No PLX chip this time, giving the four PCIe layout an x8/x4/x4 + x4 similar to the GIGABYTE Z87X-OC motherboard we reviewed last year. The overclocking buttons and switches at the top right are back, along with the USB ports next to the SATA ports. For PCIe power there is a 6-pin PCIe connector above the PCIe slots. For Z87 this level of motherboard was in the $200 range, forgoing some of the exotic features (particularly on audio) to provide a less expensive overclocking oriented platform.

For connectivity, the UD7 TH:

We did not get a chance to review the Z87 version of the UD7, but judging by the markings on the PCB here it is safe to say that it is being updated for Thunderbolt 2. While we cannot see the rear IO panel, it should be safe to assume that the TB2 ports are on the rear IO rather than an add-in card due to the lack of a TB header. The UD7 TH seems a bit toned down this time, with fewer SATA ports (making room for the SATA Express) and no obvious IR355x ICs. This might potentially leave room for a UD9 in the product stack for the future.

For the mainstream, the UD5H-BK:

The Black Edition version for the UD5H lives up to its name, with a few streaks of yellow on the heatsinks showing. Rather than equipping TB2 like the UD7 TH, the UD5H-BK uses more substantial power delivery and offers a similar SATA port/PCIe arrangement. In fact these two motherboards look rather alike, but with money being spent in different places. I would not be surprised if they end up in the same price bracket.

Additional: We have just been given the go-ahead to post these un-doctored images from a GIGABYTE media event, showing most of the motherboards off in more detail including the name of the chipset.

The newer one from this list is the UD3H:

This looks a lot like the UD5H and UD7 in terms of color scheme, and offers M.2 with an Intel NIC.  This board seems to be equipped with SATA Express (as some of the images show, four SATA ports with two being modified for SATA Express) and one USB 3.0 header.  This motherboard looks a lot less busy around the socket area as well, in terms of extra resistors.

Upcoming Intel Based Motherboards from GIGABYTE, ASUS, MSI and ASRock ASUS’ New Products
POST A COMMENT

58 Comments

View All Comments

  • juhatus - Monday, April 28, 2014 - link

    I can't wait for M.2 to rumble in on desktop-side, having and using it on Sony vaio pro 13 its just awesome that boot is "instant-on" in 7 seconds.

    Comment on:
    "One of these slots is called ‘Ultra M.2’, with the words ‘PCIe Gen3 x4’ next to it, suggesting that they are implementing an x4 M.2 slot for the faster devices."
    Isnt there Samsung xp941 thats x4 M.2 also there are rumours about LSI M.2 Griffin.. (1.8Gb/s)

    http://www.thessdreview.com/daily-news/latest-buzz...
    http://www.thessdreview.com/daily-news/latest-buzz...
    Reply
  • goinginstyle - Monday, April 28, 2014 - link

    "Gigabyte Black Edition" - Does Gigabyte have any original ideas at all? Besides the obvious color scheme ripoff of Asus ROG now they are copying their naming scheme also. ASRock's stuff looks like a crayon factory exploded. Reply
  • ddriver - Monday, April 28, 2014 - link

    If you think asus invented black+red, you must have been living under a rock. Or "black edition" for that matter. Reply
  • Flunk - Monday, April 28, 2014 - link

    Asus was definitely one of the first companies putting crazy colors on their motherboards. Reply
  • AznAnarchy99 - Monday, April 28, 2014 - link

    You obviously don't remember the DFI LanParty motherboards. Reply
  • littlebitstrouds - Monday, April 28, 2014 - link

    Who the heck argues about marketing schemes for million dollar companies? UUUUGH Gap just started a BOGO sale, but Old Navy did it first! Reply
  • LordOfTheBoired - Monday, May 05, 2014 - link

    Both posers. Payless Shoes did the ORIGINAL BOGO, before it went mainstream. Reply
  • Antronman - Monday, April 28, 2014 - link

    The black PCB design + Red slots and highlights design was originally used by ASUS.

    The term "black edition" was originally coined by AMD.

    The funniest part is that the gigabyte mobo isn't even close to being black, much like the Titan BE :P
    Reply
  • nevertell - Monday, April 28, 2014 - link

    Wait, so you are arguing about the origin of such bland marketing terms as "black edition" ? And cutting each other's throat about the color scheme ? I understand that there could be some debate about the latter, but nobody can get a patent on a color scheme, and no one should be. The originality of the cosmetics is just a moot point, there is no such thing as original, when every motherboard model is made in thousands. Do you want the motherboards tailored to one's individual preferences, like Motorola is doing with the Moto X ? If you want it to be original, order the chips and build your own. As for the naming scheme, differentiation is better than just changing a single letter in the model code. Whilst you could argue that there are better phrases than "black edition", it's hardly the worst http://www.anandtech.com/show/7067/computex-2013-e...
    I couldn't care any less about the colour scheme and name of a motherboard, I care only about the build quality and the functionality/features a certain board has.
    Reply
  • Antronman - Monday, April 28, 2014 - link

    Neither of which Gigabyte has plenty of. Reply

Log in

Don't have an account? Sign up now