Corsair Graphite 760T: Introduction and Packaging

Corsair has been releasing one case after another lately, expanding their already large ranks with an even greater variety of products. It has been less than three months since the release of the Obsidian 250D, a cubic Mini-ITX case, and only two days since another member of the Obsidian series, the Midi-ATX Obsidian 450D, has been announced. Today, Corsair announced the release of yet another case, the Graphite 730T/760T.

Unlike the Obsidian 450D, which was released in order to fill a specific gap into the already heavily populated Obsidian series, the release Graphite 730T/760T does not appear to have such a purpose. There are only two Graphite cases currently available, the 230T and the 600T and, considering the MSRP of the Graphite 730T/760T versions and that its aesthetic design is similar to that of the 230T, it seems more likely that it has been released as a replacement for the 600T rather than having products that will coexist. As such, the primary changes will be a modified aesthetic and improved performance.

We should clarify that the 730T and the 760T are essentially the same case; the major difference is that the former has an opaque left panel and the latter an acrylic window. The Graphite 760T also has a basic 2-speed fan controller installed and will become available in both Black and Arctic White colors. It is the Arctic White version of the Graphite 760T that we will be reviewing today. Corsair informed us that the new Graphite cases will become available through North American retailers in late April.

Corsair Graphite 760T Specifications
Motherboard Form Factor Mini-ITX, Micro-ATX, ATX, EATX, XL-ATX
Drive Bays External 3 x 5.25"
Internal 6 x 2.5"/3.5" (front drive cage)
6 x 2.5"/3.5" (optional front drive cages)
4 x 2.5" (rear of motherboard tray)
Cooling Front 2 x 120 / 140mm (2 x 140mm included)
Rear 1 x 140mm (included)
Top 3 x 120mm / 140mm (optional)
Left Side -
Bottom optional 120mm (drive cage must be removed/relocated)
Radiator Support Front Up to 240mm / 280mm
Rear 120mm / 140mm
Top Up to 360mm / 280mm
Side -
Bottom 120mm
I/O Port 2 × USB 3.0
2 × USB 3.0
1 × Headphone
1 × Mic
Fan Speed Toggle
Power Supply Size ATX
Clearances HSF 180mm
PSU Any
GPU 340mm (with drive cage)
460mm (without drive cage)
Dimensions 568mm × 246mm × 564mm (H×W×D)
22.4 in × 9.7 in × 22.2 in (H×W×D)
Prominent Features Hinged side panel with full window
360mm radiator support
Removable magnetic top panel
Two-speed fan control
Side-mounted tool-free SSD trays
Removable, reconfigurable 3.5” drive cages
Price 189 USD (MSRP)

The Graphite 760T comes in Corsair's traditional and visually simple brown cardboard box, the proportions of which hint that this is not a typical Mid-Tower case. Printed on the box are a schematic of the case and a short presentation covering its most important features. Inside the box, the case is wrapped inside a cloth-like bag and protected by very thick expanded polyethylene foam slabs.

The bundle of the Graphite 760T is very basic, especially considering the class of the case. Corsair only supplies the necessary screws and bits, a few short cable ties, and an installation guide. There are no cable straps or any other additional extras. The only positive thing about the bundle is that the supplied parts are black. If you like getting "extras", this is disappointing, but for some users the extras would simply be more clutter.

Corsair Graphite 760T Exterior
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  • rcarlos243 - Thursday, March 27, 2014 - link

    $189 for a plastic case, really.... Reply
  • mmrezaie - Thursday, March 27, 2014 - link

    apparently! Reply
  • chrome_slinky - Thursday, March 27, 2014 - link

    I agree, it is a lot for that. Also, 3 5.25" open to the front? For that kind of money, I'd expect to see at least 4, and preferably 5 or 6. Simply because most don't use removable media doesn't mean that everyone is that way, and besides, there are some two and three bay displays which would severely limit this case in usefulness, were they to be a part of the build. Reply
  • peterfares - Thursday, March 27, 2014 - link

    Front drive bays is a bit of an odd thing to complain about. 3 is way more than 99% of people will use. There are other case options if you want to make a disc replicating station. Reply
  • Haravikk - Monday, March 31, 2014 - link

    Actually I prefer to have cases with as many 5.25" bays as possible, with adapters to transform them into 2.5"/3.5" bays and/or fan mounts. This is dead easy to do (especially for an expensive case, I've bought $40 cases with it) and it gives a much greater degree of flexibility in how you configure the case, plus it gives you as much space as possible for accessories designed to fit 5.25" bays such as fan-controllers, extra I/O panels, hot-swappable hard drive backplanes and so-on.

    Don't get me wrong, for smaller cases you should absolutely ditch all things optical to conserve space, but if the case is going to be tower sized anyway, then I prefer flexibility above all. I mean, by the same logic, who needs 6-12 hard drive slots? Most gamers use two; an SSD and an HDD, probably with an external drive for backup since you can plug it into another machine if you need to (so you aren't stuck if your motherboard, CPU, PSU or even GPU, if you have no other video chip, fails on you).

    For the price I'd also expect a much less ugly case, and a temperature controlled fan controller, rather than a basic manual one.
    Reply
  • 7amood - Sunday, April 06, 2014 - link

    I need at least 8 hard drive slots. Reply
  • Earballs - Tuesday, June 10, 2014 - link

    It seems clear to me that the customer should be able to decide. Options are always fun. ;) Reply
  • Subyman - Thursday, March 27, 2014 - link

    Yuck! I'd prefer to not have any. The bays are the ugliest part of this case. I'd like to see a proper fan controller integrated into the case and the front being all intake, perhaps fit a 360 rad there. I have a USB CD drive that I pull out whenever I need it. Reply
  • Antronman - Sunday, March 30, 2014 - link

    There are people who would like to fit an Asus OC Panel or Front Base along with their fan controller and a DVD/BLR drive. It needs an extra 5.25" Reply
  • E.Fyll - Friday, March 28, 2014 - link

    Well, actually, from an engineering point of view, the whole "plastic vs metal" thing is just a silly debate. Plastic is a material that, depending on its composition and density, can have far superior characteristics that even the best of metals. Actually, it can be so much harder and lighter than metal that plastics are being added to both vehicle and personal armor to stop piercing projectiles. The front panel of the 760T is far more rigid than the flimsy metallic panels of cheap cases, for example. Plastic can easily be far more flexible, lighter and damage resistant than SECC steel or even aluminum, it depends on the quality of the plastic used.

    As for the appearance/prestige goes, it is a subjective matter and I am with you on this one; I too would probably prefer a cold, minimalistic, all-metal case myself. That is not true for everyone though and it does not mean that the design of the 760T is bad.
    Reply

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