Crysis Warhead

Up next is our legacy title for 2013, Crysis: Warhead. The stand-alone expansion to 2007’s Crysis, at over 4 years old Crysis: Warhead can still beat most systems down. Crysis was intended to be future-looking as far as performance and visual quality goes, and it has clearly achieved that. We’ve only finally reached the point where high-end single-GPU cards have come out that can hit 60fps at 1920 with 4xAA, while low-end GPUs are just now hitting 60fps at lower quality settings and resolutions.

Crysis: Warhead

I can't believe it. An Intel integrated solution actually beats out an NVIDIA discrete GPU in a Crysis title. The 5200 does well here, outperforming the 650M by 12% in its highest TDP configuration. I couldn't run any of the AMD parts here as Bulldozer based parts seem to have a problem with our Crysis benchmark for some reason.

Crysis: Warhead is likely one of the simpler tests we have in our suite here, which helps explain Intel's performance a bit. It's also possible that older titles have been Intel optimization targets for longer.

Crysis: Warhead

Ramping up the res kills the gap between the highest end Iris Pro and the GT 650M.

Crysis: Warhead

Moving to higher settings and at a higher resolution gives NVIDIA the win once more. The margin of victory isn't huge, but the added special effects definitely stress whatever Intel is lacking within its GPU architecture.

Crysis 3 GRID 2
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  • tipoo - Saturday, June 01, 2013 - link

    It still seems to me that this misses where it would benefit most: 13 inch laptops, which currently mostly use dual core processors. GT3e would make something like the Retina MBP 13" much more appealing for instance, but it's paired with processors such that the wattage would be too high. Reply
  • tipoo - Saturday, June 01, 2013 - link

    Oh and I wanted to ask, if the integrated graphics are disabled can the CPU still tap into the eDRAM? Reply
  • Ryan Smith - Saturday, June 01, 2013 - link

    Yes, it's a dedicated cache for both the CPU and the GPU. However it's very unlikely you're going to run into any scenario that uses a Crystalwell-equipped part in such a manner. It's not being sold in socket form, so it will go to OEMs, who in turn would only use it if they didn't include a dGPU. Reply
  • jeffkibuule - Saturday, June 01, 2013 - link

    So pretty much, unless you've got some huge beefy GPU that would absolutely suck up power compared to just using Iris Pro graphics, no one would opt for that SKU? Reply
  • shiznit - Saturday, June 01, 2013 - link

    Right on. A dual core model for the 13" rMPB would have me selling my 2012 immediately. Now I need to decide if I can live with the 15" or even bother. Reply
  • moep - Saturday, June 01, 2013 - link

    If i interpreted the results of this article correctly, I suspect that the 15" MBP is probably going to get a new and even thinner form factor with this refresh. (one chip less, fewer VRM related parts, lower combined TDP)

    A 15" rMBP approaching the weight of a 15" Macbook Air would be very interesting, although a part of me hoped that Apple would wait until Broadwell to ditch the dGPU in the 15".

    Such a step back in GPU performance with the Retina display is surely not going to be very pleasant in 3D applications.
    Reply
  • Galatian - Saturday, June 01, 2013 - link

    I actually hope/suspect, that Apple will go the other road: use a discrete graphic solution on the 15" rMBP until Broadwell comes out, but have a cTDPdown version of the 4850HQ on the 13" rMBP. Maybe they can even get the normal TDP version in there; after all it has the same (good) cooling the 15" rMBP has and I have never heard the fans on mine. I think Apple really designed it with Haswell in mind, so let's see what they'll bring on during the next few weeks. Reply
  • tipoo - Saturday, June 01, 2013 - link

    That's certainly the best case, I really hope they go down that road. The rMBP as a quad with Iris Pro would really make it worth the Pro name. Reply
  • vFunct - Sunday, June 02, 2013 - link

    They'll probably stick with the built in GPU for the 13" model and a discrete GPU for the 15" model, which is what they do right now.

    Apple's top-end MacBook Pro has always had the highest end discrete GPU available.
    Reply
  • Spunjji - Tuesday, June 04, 2013 - link

    I'm guessing you mean "for a given power usage", as there are definitely faster GPUs out there than the 650M. Reply

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