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Application and Futuremark Performance

While our review unit has a reasonable fast processor, the GPU is a relative unknown on the mobile side, and the PCMarks are going to drop like rocks due to the lack of an SSD or even SSD caching. The lack of switchable graphics in the HP EliteBook 8570w also means users won't get the benefit of Quick Sync, but the AMD GPU makes it a poor choice for doing video editing anyhow due to the lack of AMD support in the current version of Adobe's Mercury Playback Engine.

PCMark 7 - PCMarks

PCMark 7 - Lightweight

PCMark 7 - Productivity

PCMark 7 - Creativity

PCMark 7 - Entertainment

PCMark 7 - Computation

PCMark 7 - Storage

Futuremark PCMark Vantage

The lack of an SSD or any kind of caching absolutely kills the test results in the PCMarks. Remember that you can order the 8570w with either an SSD cache or a system SSD, although you can't order it with a system SSD in the mSATA slot (something Dell does allow you to do).

Futuremark 3DMark 11

Futuremark 3DMark Vantage

Futuremark 3DMark Vantage

Futuremark 3DMark06

It turns out that the AMD FirePro 4000M is also a mite slower than the other graphics options, and roughly on par with the GeForce GT 650M in the Samsung Series 7, at least where graphical horsepower is concerned.

Cinebench R11.5 - Single-Threaded Benchmark

Cinebench R11.5 - Multi-Threaded Benchmark

x264 HD Benchmark - First Pass

x264 HD Benchmark - Second Pass

When we start pushing just the CPU, though, the EliteBook 8570w starts to come into its own, offering performance comparable to ther i7-3720QM-based systems. Though I've mentioned my concerns with heat (more on that in a bit), it doesn't seem to be seriously affecting overall system performance as the 8570w is lining up just fine.

In and Around the HP EliteBook 8570w Workstation Performance
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  • CobaltFire - Tuesday, December 18, 2012 - link

    Before you have corrected the misinformation (Optimus on Quadro) pointed out in the last? Further, you have not addressed the very real concerns of your bias in these reviews as of yet. Reply
  • Maraque - Tuesday, December 18, 2012 - link

    Yes, why? Personally, for me, his workstation reviews have lost a lot of credibility after his last farce of a review.
    "Sir, you need to step away from the workstations, please, until you have been deemed not a threat."
    Reply
  • Dustin Sklavos - Tuesday, December 18, 2012 - link

    I didn't like the Precision M6700's design. I felt like the EliteBook 8760w I had reviewed was a better built workstation. I still do.

    I can recognize that I was needlessly harsh about the M6700, though, and indeed folded information and feedback into this review.

    You can accept progress and try to see a concerted effort to move forward, or you can continue harping. It's up to you.
    Reply
  • theeldest - Tuesday, December 18, 2012 - link

    This review was better than the last but I still take issue with two points:

    1. Aesthetics. It's OK to comment on it but you make it sound as if others should consider your opinion on this issue when purchasing. As you said above, you thought the 8760w was better built and that's what we need to hear. Quality of materials and build. But try to keep in mind that other people don't have the same appreciation for HPs design as you.

    2. "Standard" keyboards. Why do you consider HPs the more 'standard' layout? The layout on the Dell is the same as they've been using in the Latitudes and Precisions since 2001. Literally more than 10 years.

    HP on the other hand has switched during the EliteBook's short life. Interestingly, the first and second generation used the SAME keyboard layout as Dell. So I'd argue (and have evidence to support) that the current HPs are using a NON-standard layout.

    This is why we have issue with these reviews. You're making sweeping statements that aren't backed up by fact and you're using these to support your position.

    As soon as you do this, you lose credibility. This review was better than the last, but you've still got room for growth.
    Reply
  • CobaltFire - Tuesday, December 18, 2012 - link

    Have you addressed the lack of basic technical research regarding the Optimus system? This is critical in any informed discussion of these laptops.

    Optimus with an 8 bit screen makes for great battery life, but you do not get that wonderful IPS screen. Note that HP does not bother even giving you this choice due to their design.

    If you want IPS, FirePro, or HP you lose ~60% runtime. This would have taken almost no research to find out, and nowhere in any publications I have seen does it state that Optimus does not work with Quadro.

    This site has always seemed to be about having accurate information, even if the reviews were a little behind. Your reviews, and your unwillingness to acknowledge the errors in a timely manner (as Anand has done many times) are not in keeping with this sites reputation.

    This is a long time readers opinion. I do not typically comment because so many others do such a good job of covering what I may be interested in.
    Reply
  • ggathagan - Tuesday, December 18, 2012 - link

    What exactly are you asking for with regards to Optimus?
    From your statement, I suspect that you are already aware of the fact that Optimus is not supported on Quadro cards, just as it's not supported on desktop systems.
    What else is there, then, to say about the matter?

    The article clearly states that the use of the 10-bit panel precludes the use of Optimus.

    Lastly, since a Quadro card was not used in this laptop, I don't understand how the lack of Optimus support for Quadro is germane to this review.
    Reply
  • Goodstorybro - Tuesday, December 18, 2012 - link

    Optimus does work with Quadro cards - as demonstrated with Dells M4700 and W530 Thinkpads.

    Personally, I think the hit on battery with using an IPS panel is too much. Most users will have an larger external monitor as their primary display to do real work, while the extended battery life will be much more useful on the road.
    Reply
  • solipsism - Tuesday, December 18, 2012 - link

    I don't quite get why these higher end notebooks aren't compared to MBPs running Windows. Are they not an option one might make if looking for a $1200 or higher notebook? Reply
  • bobdole1997 - Tuesday, December 18, 2012 - link

    From the review, the MBP does not have a workstation-class GPU. So it was not compared. Reply
  • solipsism - Tuesday, December 18, 2012 - link

    I did not see that mentioned. Thank you. Reply

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