This isn't major news, but I find the periodic updates to the 3DMark suite at least interesting if only to see what Futuremark is up to. They have released a trailer showing a portion of the next 3DMark, dubbed Fire Strike. Designed to push the envelope in terms of rendering quality and techniques, Fire Strike makes use of a variety of DirectX 11 features including tessellation, dynamic particle illumination and shadowing, smoke simulation using grid-based fluid dynamics, volume ray casting with shadows, and a wide variety of post processing effects including depth of field, blooms, distortions and various lens effects.

Futuremark didn't indicate the name of the next 3DMark release, but they're promising a release before the end of 2012 so the clock is ticking. It is designed to provide a unified benchmark suite for testing everything from tablets to notebooks to desktops, including support for Windows RT, Android, and iOS.

The Fire Strike benchmark is targeting the high performance desktops rather than tablets, with other benchmarks for DX10 and DX9 level devices. Cloud Gate will handle the DX10 duties, with Ice Storm being the cross platform "DX9" level test. On Windows, it will use a DX11 engine limited to DX9 level features, whereas Android and iOS will use OpenGL ES 2.0. The scores will be comparable cross-platform.

You can see the full 3DMark Fire Strike trailer on YouTube, and if you have a high-res qHD or qWXGA display you can even view it at the original resolution of 2560x1440 (albeit with compression artifacts). We should have the final release for testing and evaluation some time in the next month, and it will be nice to have another graphics test outside of GLBenchmark to add to our suite, especially since we'll have comparison points between the three major mobile OSes.

Source: Futuremark

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  • haukionkannel - Monday, December 03, 2012 - link

    It will be nice to see how different mobile platforms can handle this test or actually part of it. If nothing else it will be guite suitable for feature check in tool. Allso it will interesting to see how different OS platforms can handle this compared to those Egypt test and other "game" like test that are out there. Reply
  • Iketh - Monday, December 03, 2012 - link

    what? Reply
  • CZroe - Monday, December 03, 2012 - link

    I watched the trailer: Nowhere did it say "First Strike."
    I searched this page: Nowhere did it say "Fire Strike."

    Something is amiss.
    Reply
  • JarredWalton - Monday, December 03, 2012 - link

    Already corrected -- sorry. My brain saw "First Strike" and that stuck, and it took an email from Futuremark before I noticed the mistake. LOL Reply
  • scook9 - Monday, December 03, 2012 - link

    They should also release an Xbox 360 and PS3 version so everyone can see how laughable that graphics technology really is..... Reply
  • tipoo - Monday, December 03, 2012 - link

    I wish they did that. However that would likely require a big rewrite of the engine, so much so that the scores may not be comparable to PCs. I really do wish there was a test like that for consoles though. Reply
  • scook9 - Tuesday, December 04, 2012 - link

    They all run DX, isn't that the point, make the coding universal across hardware as long as it uses DX? Reply
  • Death666Angel - Tuesday, December 04, 2012 - link

    DX belongs to Microsoft and thus doesn't run on PS3 or Wii hardware. They have similar effects etc. but that's not to be confused with DX on the Xbox/Windows side. Reply
  • JarredWalton - Tuesday, December 04, 2012 - link

    Don't forget that consoles are now very old hardware -- DX9 era. Even a very basic graphics chip is already substantially faster than an Xbox 360 or PS3. Of course, writing code that works optimally on a wide range of hardware is part of the difficulty of PC gaming, which is why even with inferior graphics hardware the Xbox and PS3 can still look decent -- but nowhere near what a midrange GPU can manage, of course. Reply
  • tipoo - Tuesday, December 04, 2012 - link

    The Xenos was something of a prototype DX10 chip, or at least halfway between fixed function DX9 chips and DX10. It had tessellation and unified shaders before any shipping graphics card, for instance. Reply

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