Crysis: Warhead

Kicking things off as always is Crysis: Warhead. It’s no longer the toughest game in our benchmark suite, but it’s still a technically complex game that has proven to be a very consistent benchmark. Thus even four years since the release of the original Crysis, “but can it run Crysis?” is still an important question, and the answer continues to be “no.” While we’re closer than ever, full Enthusiast settings at a 60fps is still beyond the grasp of a single-GPU card.

If GTX 680 had one weakness in particular it was Crysis, and that certainly hasn’t changed with GTX 670. The good news is that the GTX 670 does relatively well compared to the GTX 680 because of its memory bandwidth – GK104 in general seems to be memory bandwidth constrained here – but that’s where the good news ends. GTX 670 can’t otherwise tie the Radeon HD 7950, let alone beat it or threaten the 7970.

Overall performance isn’t particularly strong either. Given the price tag of the GTX 670 the most useful resolution is likely going to be 2560x1600, where the GTX 670 can’t even cross 30fps at our enthusiast settings. Even 1920x1200 isn’t looking particularly good. This is without a doubt the legitimate lowpoint of the GTX 670.

As for gamers looking to upgrade, the GTX 670 looks decent here compared to the GTX 570, but nothing fantastic. The memory bandwidth limitations mean that performance has only gained 33%, which isn’t particularly great for an 18 month span.

Finally, EVGA’s first performance here is decent, but nothing spectacular. Thanks to a combination of being TDP limited and Crysis’s memory bandwidth limits, the GTX 670 Superclocked is at best 3% faster here.

The story with minimum framerates is much the same. The GTX 670 can closely trail the GTX 680, but it’s still not up to the caliber of the 7950 let alone the 7970.

The Test Metro: 2033
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  • Blackchild1101 - Thursday, May 10, 2012 - link

    I'll take two please! Reply
  • Ryan Smith - Thursday, May 10, 2012 - link

    You'll get nothing and like it!

    (Sorry, was watching Caddyshack last weekend)
    Reply
  • Wreckage - Thursday, May 10, 2012 - link

    To think a few months ago you could have gotten a pair of 7970s for $1100.

    I'm betting there are a lot of sad AMD fans out there. Their viral marketing group in the forums is going to have a rough year for sure.
    Reply
  • retrospooty - Thursday, May 10, 2012 - link

    I doubt anyone that places happiness in their preferred companies products being #1 is all too happy to begin with ;) Reply
  • RampantAndroid - Tuesday, May 15, 2012 - link

    Sure, but realizing that waiting a few months could have saved them serious $$$.

    Same probably goes for GTX680 owners.
    Reply
  • CeriseCogburn - Monday, May 28, 2012 - link

    The partners of nVidia are going to be happy, because what comes out of the 680 and 670 is an auto overclock and an overclockable card, with locks on power increases, and therefore far, far less chance of anything burning out.

    Overclock to your hearts desire - you won't be burning these up while the amd cards will still be a housefire and cost the partners plenty to replace.

    nVidia's partners are very, very happy.
    Reply
  • JlHADJOE - Saturday, July 21, 2012 - link

    They would if they have stocks invested though.

    /putting money where fanboy mouth is
    Reply
  • Lazlo Panaflex - Thursday, May 10, 2012 - link

    Waaaaaah waaaaah I can't post in the forums waaaaaaaah waaaaaaaaah

    btw, your mom says 'hi' & said to get back in the basement
    Reply
  • wut - Thursday, May 10, 2012 - link

    Oh no, YOUR MOM. Reply
  • Lazlo Panaflex - Thursday, May 10, 2012 - link

    bwahahahahahahahaha :D Reply

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