Clearwire has been talking about deploying TDD-LTE (Time Division Duplexing, as opposed to FDD) on its 2.5 GHz spectrum for some time now, and has announced some more launch details today, including initial markets and a rough timeline. Clearwire is focusing on upgrading "hot zones" in urban markets first, which probably means its most actively used cell sites.

In its earnings report, Clearwire notes that it has already completed the first phase of its network overlay on 8,000 such "hot zone" cell sites, primarily ones where it can offload for future compatible Sprint and Cricket devices. Some 5,000 of such cell sites are in major markets which it is targeting for early 2013 launch, including New York City, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Chicago and Seattle. Clearwire is planning to launch its TDD-LTE network in 31 total markets by mid 2013, though it notes that it will name the specific other markets at a later date. 

As an addendum, Clearwire has been trialing and demonstrating 20 MHz FDD-LTE in Phoenix, AZ for a while now on its 2.5 GHz spectrum (LTE band 41). I would fully expect to see Clearwire take full advantage of band 41's size and run 20 MHz TDD-LTE here, and implement carrier aggregation with LTE-A in the future.

Source: Clearwire (1), (2)

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  • Bull Dog - Friday, April 27, 2012 - link

    A few years back one of my roommates had Clearwire Internet. It seemed to work on at first, but as time went on the service got worse and worse. Ping times to Google.com would randomly spike to over 3 seconds, and inclement weather would also ruin the connection.

    Eventually I jumped ship and got Cable Internet. At one point, a few months before he moved out, he actually came to me and asked if he could use my internet. It was raining pretty hard outside and apparently his Clearwire service had completely stopped working.
    Reply
  • TheMouse - Friday, April 27, 2012 - link

    That's completely unrelated to this. Running high-frequency WIMAX was not clearwire's preferred option. Reply
  • 0ldman79 - Saturday, April 28, 2012 - link

    Clearwire has quite a bit of 2.5GHz spectrum and as I understand it some licensed Wimax out there.

    I may be mistaken. I was looking into their services before they started and before I started my wireless ISP.
    Reply
  • 0ldman79 - Saturday, April 28, 2012 - link

    Clearwire has quite a bit of 2.5GHz spectrum and as I understand it some licensed Wimax out there.

    I may be mistaken. I was looking into their services before they started and before I started my wireless ISP.

    And for the record, 3.5GHz and 5GHz Wimax isn't really affected by rain.
    Reply
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