Today is what OCZ calls the ‘unveiling’ of their new 4GB DDR3-2133 MHz memory modules, running at 1.65V.  Along with the unveiling, OCZ are extending the modules into 8GB dual channel kits and 12GB triple channel kits, up to 2133 MHz.  The Platinum Series will aim to cater gamers and high density users, whereas overclockers and enthusiasts may plump for the faster and more expensive Flex EX and Reaper HPC kits.

 

 

 

OCZ did not release data on sub-timings with their unveiling, leading one to believe that they are attempting to market the memory based on raw MHz alone.  In fact, delving into their website, the Flex EX 2133 MHz modules are specified at 10-10-10-30 timings, and the 2000 MHz Platinum modules are at 9-9-9-24 requiring 1.65V.  There is no word on price for the high end parts - for comparison, the OCZ Reaper HPC 2x4GB 1333Mhz CAS 9 kit can be found at Newegg for $225 after rebate, and G. Skill’s 6x4GB DDR3-1600 CAS 7 kit is currently priced at $999.  OCZ have recently been quite competitive on the pricing front with other products, such as their OCZ RevoDrive which is bringing more affordable PCIe SSDs to the market.  Maybe OCZ can start to force the price of 4GB modules down as well.  

The debate is always if machines today require more memory, and if the abundance of memory results in poor, bloated programming.  It’s true that the only people putting 24GB of memory in a PC will be those that need it, or those that want to boast and have the money - but at least more 4GB modules are hitting the market for consumers.  Though on that note, as this was only an ‘unveiling’ and not a release, no release date has been announced, however various kits have popped up on the OCZ website. 

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  • quiksilvr - Tuesday, July 13, 2010 - link

    Hardware will obviously catch up to this truly epic speed, but what about operating systems? Is it possible for RAM to reach a point when the OS throws its hands up in the air and says "SLOW DOOOOWWWN!" Or am I thinking this the wrong way? Reply
  • SandmanWN - Tuesday, July 13, 2010 - link

    Don't see how the OS would care. It simply does its job faster.

    The question for this particular memory kit is whether anything can even use its available bandwidth. Whats the point of this memory kit if it doesn't add any tangible performance to your system.
    Reply
  • SlyNine - Tuesday, July 13, 2010 - link

    I think you need to evaluate your premises. The memory isn't going to feed the CPU anything that's not requested, It'd be like wondering if a 2000 watt PSU will fry your system. Reply
  • fausto412 - Tuesday, July 13, 2010 - link

    on point there buddy! Reply
  • fepple - Wednesday, July 14, 2010 - link

    Its conceivable (though unlikely) it could expose an existing race condition in the code :) Reply
  • fausto412 - Tuesday, July 13, 2010 - link

    if trhe software doesn't take advantage of it then it's wasted money Reply
  • mapesdhs - Monday, July 19, 2010 - link


    It depends entirely on the OS, eg. run IRIX on an Origin with 1024GB RAM, it'll hum
    along just fine. My mid-range system has 72GB.

    Good hardware helps of course though. This is why professional systems generally
    use ECC/buffered RAM, for better reliability, and supporting those tasks which cannot
    tolerate errors (not so important for 3D games).

    Ian.
    Reply
  • mapesdhs - Monday, July 19, 2010 - link


    It depends entirely on the OS, eg. run IRIX on an Origin with 1024GB RAM, it'll hum
    along just fine. My mid-range system has 72GB.

    Good hardware helps of course though. This is why professional systems generally
    use ECC/buffered RAM, for better reliability, and supporting those tasks which cannot
    tolerate errors (not so important for 3D games).

    Ian.
    Reply
  • fausto412 - Tuesday, July 13, 2010 - link

    we need an article looking at how ddr3 performs in a high end lga775 system, i5 system and i7 system.

    i'm not convinced DDR3 is delivering yet in real world apps/games...and also we need an overclocking ddr3 article. make it happen anandtech
    Reply
  • Rajinder Gill - Tuesday, July 13, 2010 - link

    Take a look here for DDR3 performance on i7 - this answers most of what one needs:

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/2792

    Nothing much has changed over the past year since this article went up, other than the slow introduction of 4GB modules.

    Later
    Raja
    Reply

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