The Test

With the launch of the GTX 400 series, we have gone ahead and completely rebuilt our benchmark suite. This includes rotating out several games for several new games, giving us a nice mix of DX9/10 and DX11 games. Everything else has been rebenchmarked using the latest drivers, and our power data has changed as we installed an Antec 1200W PSUin order to keep up with the potential power demands of a pair of GTX 480s in SLI.

For the AMD cards, we used AMD’s Catalyst 10.3a drivers along with the latest driver profile update. For NVIDIA’s cards NVIDIA supplied us with their Forceware 197.17 drivers, which only work for the GTX 400 series. For the rest of the NVIDIA cards we used the 197.13 drivers.

CPU: Intel Core i7-920 @ 3.33GHz
Motherboard: Intel DX58SO (Intel X58)
Chipset Drivers: Intel 9.1.1.1015 (Intel)
Hard Disk: OCZ Summit (120GB)
Memory: Patriot Viper DDR3-1333 3 x 2GB (7-7-7-20)
Video Cards: AMD Radeon HD 5970
AMD Radeon HD 5870
AMD Radeon HD 5850
AMD Radeon HD 5830
AMD Radeon HD 5770
AMD Radeon HD 5750
AMD Radeon HD 4890
AMD Radeon HD 4870 1GB
AMD Radeon HD 4850
AMD Radeon HD 3870
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 480
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 470
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 295
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 285
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 275
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 260 Core 216
NVIDIA GeForce 8800 GT
Video Drivers: NVIDIA ForceWare 197.13
NVIDIA ForceWare 197.17
AMD Catalyst 10.3a
OS: Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit

Image Quality & AA Crysis: Warhead
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  • Headfoot - Monday, March 29, 2010 - link

    Great review, great depth but not too long. Concise but still enough information.

    THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR INCLUDING MINIMUM FRAME RATES!!! IMO they contribute the most to a game feeling "smooth"
    Reply
  • niceboy60 - Friday, August 20, 2010 - link

    This review is not accurate , Badaboom GTX 400 series cards , are not compatible with GTX 400 series yet .However they already post the test resaults
    I have a GTX 480 and does not work with badaboom , Badaboom official site confirms that
    Reply
  • slickr - Sunday, March 28, 2010 - link

    I thought that after the line-up of games thread, you would really start testing games from all genres, so we can actually see how each graphic cards performs in different scenarios.

    Now you have 80% first person shooters, 10% racing/Action-adventure and 10%RPG and RTS.
    Where are the RTS games, isometric RPG's, simulation games, etc?

    I would really like Battleforge thrown out and replaced by Starcraft 2, DOW 2: Chaos Rising, Napoleon Total War. All these RTS games play differently and will give different results, and thus better knowledge of how graphic cards perform.
    How about also testing The Sims 3, NFS:Shift, Dragon Age Origins.
    Reply
  • Ryan Smith - Monday, March 29, 2010 - link

    Actually DAO was in the original test suite I wanted to use. At the high end it's not GPU limited, not in the slightest. Just about everything was getting over 100fps, at which point it isn't telling us anything useful.

    The Sims 3 and Starcraft are much the same way.
    Reply
  • Hsuku - Sunday, March 28, 2010 - link

    On Page 9 of Crysis, your final sentence indicates that SLI scales better than CF at lower resolutions, which is incorrect from your own graphs. CF clearly scales better at lower resolutions when video RAM is not filled:

    @ 1680x1050
    480 SLI -- 60.2:40.7 --> 1.48
    5870 CF -- 53.8:30.5 --> 1.76 (higher is better)

    @ 1920x1200
    480 SLI -- 54.5:33.4 --> 1.63
    5870 CF -- 46.8:25.0 --> 1.87 (higher is better)

    This indicates the CF technology scales better than SLI, even if the brute performance of the nVidia solution comes out on top. This opposes diametrically your conclusion to page 9 ("Even at lower resolutions SLI seems to be scaling better than CF").

    (Scaling ability is a comparison of ratios, not a comparison of FPS)
    Reply
  • Ryan Smith - Monday, March 29, 2010 - link

    You're looking at the minimums, not the averages. Reply
  • Hsuku - Tuesday, March 30, 2010 - link

    My apologies, I was looking at the wrong graphs.

    However, even so, your assertion is still incorrect: at at the lowest listed resolution, CF and SLI scaling are tied.
    Reply
  • Ryan Smith - Wednesday, March 31, 2010 - link

    Correct. The only thing I really have to say about that is that while we include 1680 for reference's sake, for any review of a high-end video card I'm looking nearly exclusively at 1920 and 2560. Reply
  • Hrel - Thursday, September 02, 2010 - link

    I get that, to test the card. But if you don't have a monitor that goes that high, it really doesn't matter. I'd really like to see 1080p thrown in there. 1920x1080; as that's the only resolution that matters to me and most everyone else in the US. Reply
  • Vinas - Sunday, March 28, 2010 - link

    It's pretty obvious that anantech was spanked by nVIDIA the last time they did a review. No mention of 5970 being superior to the 480 is a little disturbing. I guess the days of "trusting anandtech" are over. Come on guys, not even a mention of how easily the 5870 overclocks? The choice is still clear, dual 5870's with full cover blocks FTW! Reply

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