Package and Appearance


The retail box seems to be a little too small since the two knobs on the back of the PSU make contact with the wall of the box. We're a bit concerned with the packaging and hope that the lack of protection doesn't result in any damage during shipping. Our unit arrived without incident, but we think a quality power supply should be shipped with a bit more protection.


Along with the power supply Zippy includes a small manual, screws, and a power cord in the box. The PSU itself has a black anodized brushed aluminum housing. The fan is located on the back of the PSU with a punched out fan grille in front of it. One of the unusual additions for the retail market is the little hook Zippy includes near the AC jack. This will secure the power cord against accidental removal during operation.



A small green light under the main switch indicates the health status of the PSU. The front of the unit has large openings punched in it that serve as the air intake from the PC. The two heatsinks are located directly behind the ventilation slots.

Index Cables and Connectors
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  • crimson117 - Monday, August 06, 2007 - link

    The last two paragraphs in the Conclusion are in italics.

    http://www.anandtech.com/casecoolingpsus/showdoc.a...">http://www.anandtech.com/casecoolingpsus/showdoc.a...
    Reply
  • JarredWalton - Monday, August 06, 2007 - link

    Sorry - fixed now. Missed the closing > of the "turn off italics" tag. That's what I get for inserting a quick comment after posting. :| Reply
  • irev210 - Saturday, August 04, 2007 - link

    From a build-quality standpoint... it is hard to find another PSU that can touch these.


    I hope that anandtech looks at more zippy units.



    Reply
  • lopri - Saturday, August 04, 2007 - link

    I, like many others, am loving the new PSU review series from AT. The articles so far are superb and full of good information, and best of all is that the information is largely based on the end-users' point of view. I'd like to thank AT for these reviews. Keep up the good work! Reply
  • Duraz0rz - Friday, August 03, 2007 - link

    Are there no separate graphs for different ambient temperatures anymore? On page 5, you say you test for two different temperatures: 25C and 50C, but I only see one graph per rail and I have no clue which temperature that is for. You do mention in one of your paragraphs about Zippy being worried about testing @ 50C, so I'm confused.

    Nice review, nevertheless, but like you said, it is a little expensive.
    Reply
  • JarredWalton - Friday, August 03, 2007 - link

    The second graph (with higher temperatures) starts at 25C and ramps up to 50C by 100% load - just like in previous PSU reviews. Note the subtitle on the first temp graph - "Tested at Room Temperature". Reply
  • Duraz0rz - Friday, August 03, 2007 - link

    That's the thing...there's only one graph per rail on page 5. Reply
  • JarredWalton - Friday, August 03, 2007 - link

    The 230VAC-Room is done at room temperature (25-26C). It's present on all the charts except for the 5vsb (where it really doesn't matter much). We combined all four results into one chart because that seemed to be more useful for comparing the results and condensing the article into 8 pages instead of 22. :) Reply
  • Super Nade - Friday, August 03, 2007 - link

    You won't recommend it for overclocking or a rig with a quad-core CPU? Why? Very strange conclusion after stating that it regulates like no other. Would a real enthusiast care about noise or the 5VSB and standby efficiency when breaking records or pushing the envelope of his machine?

    "In most other areas, it unfortunately falls short."

    Apart from the electrical characteristics does the "failure" in "other" areas really matter?
    Reply
  • JarredWalton - Friday, August 03, 2007 - link

    This statement has been edited for clarity. Overclocking on it's own isn't a problem, and neither are quad cores or (certain) dual GPU configurations - don't try dual HD 2900 XT, most likely, since besides two PEG connections per card they can also use an 8-pin PEG as one of the connections. You can basically do two of the items in that list, but if you try to do all three you're going to go WAY over 600W.

    8800 GTX SLI (using factory OC'ed models) and Q6600/6700 @ ~3.47 GHz with two or three hard drives and idle power use will be in the neighborhood of 400-450W. Load up the CPU (say, Folding@Home SMP) and you can easily hit 600W or more. Play some games that load up the GPUs, and you really ought to be running a 1000W PSU - assuming maximum efficiency as usual comes in the 50-80% load range.

    It falls short in noise, cooling performance, connections for certain devices. As an enthusiast, I definitely don't want a PSU that cranks out that much noise, considering there are other PSUs (SeaSonic) that will match the Zippy in all other ways and do it at lower noise levels.
    Reply

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