Getting Inside - It's that Easy?

The bottom of the unit is made of the familiar rubber that we've seen on so many Apple products, including the Mac mini. There are no exposed screws but if you peel up one of the corners of the rubber base you'll see why:

Beneath the rubber bottom are four T10 screws and four T8 screws; armed with our torx driver we went to town:


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The rubber base is held to the metal underneath with an adhesive, unfortunately it doesn't exactly come off too easily leaving us with the mess above. It's a small sacrifice to make to satisfy our curiosities.

The outer four screws actually hold the vented plate in place, the four inner T8 screws keep the internal 40GB hard drive in place. You'll want to remove all of them though.


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Amazingly enough, that's all you have to do to get inside the Apple TV. Apple seems to vary how difficult it makes opening hardware, and the Apple TV definitely ranks as one of the easiest devices to get inside. Lifting the bottom plate reveals an IDE cable attached to the internal hard drive. With the four HDD screws removed that we mentioned earlier, the only thing keeping the drive in place is a sticky green pad. Just tug on the drive and it will come off without any trouble:


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The drive in our sample was a 40GB Fujitsu MHW2040AT:


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The drive is a 2.5" single-platter 4200 RPM PATA solution with a 2MB buffer.

Apple TV: Unplugged Motherboard: Spotted
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  • anandtech02148 - Friday, March 23, 2007 - link

    Apple is running out of ideas to innovate, that they now dumbed down pc hardwares to sell in fancy casing is sad. This pce at the Apple Store is flaming hot just to feel the top surface. I think you can warm your food while you watch tv with it.
    It's even hotter than the back of Xbox360. and i got electric shock from it when i first feel out the back of the xbox360.
    Reply
  • michael2k - Saturday, March 24, 2007 - link

    Where else can you find a PC for $299 the size of a double-CD case? Reply
  • vailr - Friday, March 23, 2007 - link

    Why no recovery disk? If anything happens to corrupt the hard drive, you'd need to return the box to Apple for service.
    Can it boot from an external USB optical drive? Running a live Knoppix version. Or maybe: live OSX?
    Reply
  • arswihart - Friday, March 23, 2007 - link

    Apple TV has none of the features I want:
    You have to buy EVERYTHING from iTunes to play on it
    It is not Hi-definition, and neither is anything on the iTunes store
    You can't even use it buy anything from the iTunes store (you 'll have to use your computer instead)
    It cannot be used as a DVR

    Basically, if they fix those things it will be good. To state it plainly, here's how they need to improve it for the next version:
    Make it able to play any media file on your computer
    Make it hi-def
    Make it possible to browse iTunes, Youtube, BitTorrent, etc, etc, etc.
    Make it function as a DVR as well

    It's really that simple. This is only for the most brazen Apple fanboys, go ahead and give Steve Jobs a knob job if you want, I'm sure he'll appreciate it.
    Reply
  • sdsdv10 - Saturday, March 24, 2007 - link

    Just which simple media extender (what the Apple TV is) does all that you ask? Reply
  • arswihart - Saturday, March 24, 2007 - link

    The Netgear thing does most of it; I don't think any product does it all just yet, except an HTPC of course. Reply
  • gus6464 - Friday, March 23, 2007 - link

    The way appletv works is that if itunes on your pc can play it, so can the appletv. So to get it to play divx and other files on it you just have to get itunes to play those files. Check google and you will find theres a couple of ways to get itunes to play any format you want, high def or not. Reply
  • arswihart - Saturday, March 24, 2007 - link

    Sorry but you are wrong. The codecs for Divx, Xvid are not installed on Apple TV.

    But now that is has been hacked to allow these codecs to be installed, things are getting very interesting!
    Reply
  • aliasfox - Friday, March 23, 2007 - link

    - You can rip your DVDs into mpeg4 files and put them into your iTunes library
    - 720p playback with the proper media is high def - not 1080i, but it still qualifies

    I don't think it needs DVR functionality - that's the same as saying an iPod needs a radio to be successful. Of course, having an easy and clearly legal way of moving your DVD collection into your iTunes library would do wonders for this - just like it did for the iPod.
    Reply
  • arswihart - Friday, March 23, 2007 - link

    Ripping DVDs into iTunes is fine, this is probably the most useful thing that it will do, and since DVD's are 480p, it's lower resolution won't cripple the already non-hi-def video quality. But there's no reason you shouldn't be able to play any kind of video on this thing, other than the fact that Apple wants to shove iTunes down everyone's throat.

    OK, DVR isn't necessary but it would make a lot of sense and wouldn't be hard to do, and I don't see why it wouldn't be included in the next version, albeit with some typical DRM crap added to the mix.

    720p is ok, too bad the only way you'll be able to see it is if you buy some of the limited selection of videos on iTunes. Again, you are missing out on all the non-iTunes content. Yes 720p "qualifies" as hi-def, just barely, and there is hardly any content that you will be able to play at this resolution, so the whole "feature" is almost non-existant.

    Reply

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