Design

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The MX Revolution's most prominent design feature is the integrated thumb rest area. While other mice might have a similar area for the thumb or grooved recesses, the sculpted curve design of the Revolution feels perfectly natural. This entire area is molded with a rubber grip that has a nice tactile feel to it. While the number of buttons first appears to be minimal, the layout design conceals the fact that there are nine available button/wheel choices. The horizontal capable scroll wheel can be configured as three buttons (left, center, right). An additional button is located below the scroll wheel along with the two side buttons and document flip wheel, all of which are configurable. The last two are the right and left click buttons that are not configurable.

The MX Revolution weighs about the same as the MX1000 but its mass is located on the bottom side of the unit instead of up top like the MX1000. This mouse is noticeably heavier and larger than the corded gaming mice and feels like a solid chunk of expensive metal. However, the weight is not overbearing and the size of the mouse actually invokes a very comfortable feeling as we found ourselves being able to "palm" the mouse during gaming.

The revised design of the Revolution allowed our hands to fit comfortably and at times it seemed as if the mouse was tailored to our hand measurements. However, those with larger hands might find the thumb rest area to be slightly small and will have their thumbs pressed against the side wheel. We thought this would be an issue at first glance as the ability to accidentally click on this wheel could be a problem. It turned out not to be a worry as the side wheel requires a firm click or forward/backward movement to operate it. The two buttons located just above the thumb wheel are easy to access. They are just high enough to keep your thumb from accidentally clicking on them but close enough that a quick upwards flick of your thumb will operate both buttons.

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The right side of the mouse has a slight indentation that allows the third finger to rest comfortably and allows for precise movements with the mouse. This side of the mouse is not coated with the same rubber but the plastic is molded to allow for a very comfortable feel that still has a slight grip to it. The forward section of the MX Revolution containing the right and left click buttons is sloped dramatically but its design ensures a relaxing position for the hand. The tactile feedback when clicking the right and left buttons were almost perfect in our opinion. It is obvious that Logitech placed an enormous amount of thought into the new shape, quality of materials, and overall mechanical operation of the mouse.


The bottom of the MX Revolution is fairly ordinary. There are four low-friction polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon based) feet designed to reduce resistance and improve gliding across most surfaces. We found the new material on the feet allowed the Revolution to glide across our mouse pad or desktop surface a lot easier than previous Logitech offerings. In fact, the difference was noticeable the first time we used the mouse. There is an on/off switch for the unit and we suggest using it for additional power savings. The last area of interest is the sensor opening for the optical sensor. Although rated at 800 dpi, which is lower than the 2000 dpi of Logitech's gaming mice, it proved to be just as accurate and flexible in everyday use. We never felt like there was a need to adjust the mouse's pointer speed and in some cases it seemed less jittery than our G5 during gaming and especially in Photoshop.

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Logitech includes a sturdy stand for the mouse that doubles as the battery charging station. A small charging adapter, SetPoint software CD, and the USB 2.0 based receiver is also included in the package along with a brief instruction guide for setting up the mouse. The MX Revolution communicates wirelessly through the USB 2.0 receiver on the 2.4 GHz frequency band with an advertised range of up to 30 feet. In our testing we found the mouse worked perfectly up to 20 feet or so without lag or skips. We did manage to reach 30 feet but the operation was awkward at best with lag and jumpiness, especially when the microwave was turned on. The mouse itself is powered by an integrated Li-Ion battery, which is charged via contacts on the bottom when the mouse is placed in the mouse stand.

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  • solrac111 - Monday, August 06, 2007 - link

    This is not the only review on the Logitech's MX Revolution mouse available on the Web.
    This particular review seems quite honest and points out not only the pros but also the cons.
    I do not the PC for games. My main use is postwork of Photography.
    After reading the reviews available about this mouse I decided to buy it a week ago.
    So far all I expected from this expensive mouse is achieved.
    Besides that my wrist and arm are painless after hours of intensive use.
    I agree that Logitech should improve the MX Revolution mouse software as the configuration of buttons is quite limited compared to earlier models.
    Reply
  • Dainas - Sunday, April 29, 2007 - link

    I bought one of these a few months ago to replace my MX1000, all I gotta say about it is the MX revolution is the biggest pile of overpriced crap in the mouse world.

    First off the sensor is in the stupidest place, right under your wrist on the opposite end it was on the mx1000, so you gotta move it like a paperweight to move the pointer the littlest bit and its completely worthless for gaming(also it feels terribly imprecise like a trackball under both the logitech and windows drivers). The thumb scroll is too slippery/imprecise, as is the main scroll bar. Unless you have super long yeti fingers there's no way to reach the right button without inadvertently hitting the back button with your thumb. Mind you it took me atleast a week to get used to the MX1000, but I gave my MX revolution 3 weeks before I returned it.

    This anandtech review has got to be the worse I have ever read, the fact that no one amongst you didn't want to throw the MX revolution out the window after 10 minutes of use(or that this review was likely done by only one person), makes it complete bogus to me.
    Reply
  • kmmatney - Thursday, September 28, 2006 - link

    Nice review. I'm currently using ancient Logitech "iFeel" mouse, with vibration feedback, which was supported (I think) by one game ever. The only good thing about the force feedback feature is that it adds a nice amount of weight. Maybe I should get a new mouse... Reply
  • bbomb - Saturday, September 30, 2006 - link

    I have a MS IntelliMouse Optical USB. I think it was either MS's first or second optical mouse. I think it is much more picky about the surface its on than newer models so I may have to upgrade this holiday season.
    Reply
  • GhandiInstinct - Thursday, September 28, 2006 - link

    Great review Gary, keep em' comin' :)

    My G7 does wonders for me and for $100 it would not justify this minor upgrade.
    Reply
  • AtaStrumf - Thursday, September 28, 2006 - link

    G7 here as well. It's a good mouse with the notable exception of battery life, which sux. 24h if you use it a lot and much les if you game with it. Can be a few days if you don't really use it much. Reply
  • GokieKS - Thursday, September 28, 2006 - link

    I know that the MX Revolution isn't really designed to be a gaming mouse, but I'd like to hear your thoughts on how it fares for gaming, especially in the area of how much control you have over binding different buttons/actions. The horizontal scroll wheel, for example... would I be able to bind the forward/backward/click actions to different actions in, say, World of Warcraft?

    I've been looking for a replacement for my MX500 and MX700 for a long time now, but all the new "gaming mice" (from Logitech, whose products I prefer having used their mice for nearly a decade, or even anyone else) have not been truly viable options. The MX518 is pretty much just a MX500 w/ better sensitivity, and I don't find that a problem; the MX1000 was tempting, but like the MX700, it's too heavy, and makes the switching between my computers awkward; the G5 looked like a wonderful mouse, but it had one major shortcoming - less buttons than the MX500; the G7 had the shortcomings of both the G5 AND the MX1000, so it was never an option.

    So now we come to the MX Revolution. If the horizontal scrolling document flip... thingy... can have the 3 actions associated with it be remapped, it may just be what I need. I just don't want to have to drive 20 minutes, spend $100+Tax, and then find out that it doesn't work.
    Reply
  • Gary Key - Friday, September 29, 2006 - link

    quote:

    So now we come to the MX Revolution. If the horizontal scrolling document flip... thingy... can have the 3 actions associated with it be remapped, it may just be what I need. I just don't want to have to drive 20 minutes, spend $100+Tax, and then find out that it doesn't work.


    The mouse is not designed for gaming, that said I was able to map/bind the majority of buttons and the scroll wheel in several games. I was not successful in binding the side wheel at all. Email me with your WoW settings and I will try them for you. :)
    Reply
  • GokieKS - Friday, September 29, 2006 - link

    quote:

    The mouse is not designed for gaming, that said I was able to map/bind the majority of buttons and the scroll wheel in several games. I was not successful in binding the side wheel at all. Email me with your WoW settings and I will try them for you. :)


    Nothing special... just try to bind 3 different buttons to to pushing/pulling/clicking the document flip scrolling thing. If that works, it'll be all that I need.

    Much appreciated, and I forgot to say earlier, but a very nice review. =)
    Reply
  • Gary Key - Monday, October 02, 2006 - link

    Answers today, going to try uberoptions also. Reply

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