Application Analysis

The core of our LCD benchmarking comes from real application analysis. We play with a lot of monitors and it gets easier for us each time to pick out problems with an LCD just by using the right application. Here are a few quick looks at some demanding full screen applications. We already ran ColorVision's OptiCal software, so all of our monitors are calibrated and adjusted to the same curves.

High Definition Video – We played the WMV9 1080p version of "Under Sea Adventure" to give our monitor a little taste of high definition video. We don't get the full experience, of course, because the monitor is not sized correctly to fit a 1080p signal; there is some cropping. Like the Samsung 193P from the 19" LCD roundup, there was a slight issue with red shift noticeable on blue images.


Click to enlarge.


The Matrix Reload, The Matrix - We use the Matrix series to test full motion video on our LCDs. Since the Matrix isn't the best movie to test color reproduction, we typically only look for motion blur on gray-to-gray transitions or other imperfections in the signal. We noticed no imperfections in the screen regularity; and zero artifacts using the DVI connector. We very briefly used the LCD under the analog connector and did notice problems across the letterbox. Occasional artifacts would crop up near the letterbox borders, but this is undoubtedly due to interference issues with the analog cable.

WarHammer 40K, Dawn of War - When looking for a monitor's response time, we generally only consult first-person shooters for reference. However, those of you who have played a fast-paced game of Warcraft III or NeverWinter Nights will know that scrolling around for hours puts a severe tax on the monitor. We did not notice any significant problems while scrolling on our 1905FP - the game seems perfectly playable to us.

Max Payne 2 - The extreme light and dark transitions in Max Payne still provide us with the sufficient criteria to benchmark transient response time; specifically, we can focus on the light and dark extremes. Again, we get an occasional red shift here and there. Since the monitor does let us adjust the color ever slightly, we modified the color preset a nudge toward blue and green. This compensated for the red issues in most cases.

Halo, Unreal Tournament 2004 - Halo and UT2K4 have very similar results, but now, we are looking for fast motion and color correctness at the same time. After adjusting the color toward blue/green, we had to set it back when playing Halo and UT2K4. Fast motion was on par with what we expected for this game; we certainly didn't notice any motion blur, but if the Dell 1905FP is your first LCD, then you will notice a difference immediately.


Quantitative Analysis Subjective Analysis
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  • UncleMike987 - Wednesday, May 11, 2005 - link

    A really great monitor, a fantastic display, which surprisingly had no ghosting in games when using the DVI connection.

    But when I plugged this into a VGA connection on a Radeon 9000 AGP card, and the image was pretty dire. Several vertical bands, each of which blurred an entire column of the display. Okay, it could've been the video card, but it looked fine on a CRT monitor. You've been warned !

    The worst thing about this monitor is the price.
    Dell's pricing policy in the UK is madness.

    One of my work colleagues bought this monitor recently, and was charged £299+vat+delivery.
    Two weeks later, the same monitor from the same Dell website cost £243 INCLUSIVE of VAT and delivery, so I bought one for work and one for home. And love it.

    And now, two weeks later, Dell's website is back selling it at £354 inc.

    Seriously, how can you recommend a product whose price is springing around so much ?

    At £243 inc for a quality brand 19" DVI monitor, it's a steal. Buy one now. But don't pay much more than this. With Dell's never-ending and never-static list of special offers and "Must end in 2 days"-style discounts, it's worth holding on for a week or two to save yourself a lot of money.

    Btw, speakers aren't included - but you can buy a matching Dell Soundbar thing to clip on the bottom of the display for £30+vat. Dell's website gives no indication of how powerful these speakers are, so it's hard to know if to recommend them.


    Mike
    Bristol, UK


    Reply
  • KristopherKubicki - Monday, April 25, 2005 - link

    chrisjs is correct.

    Kristopher
    Reply
  • chrisjs - Sunday, April 24, 2005 - link

    I am fairly sure that the 1905fp DOES NOT SUPPORT HDCP.

    I just had my local friendly cable co install a SA 4200HD and, when I connect it to my 1905fp the LCD simply displays "cannot display this video mode"

    I hoped it just needed to be configured, but the message continued when I went into to box's automagcic HDTV configuration screen. So I'm pretty sure now this LCD doesn't support DVI/HDCP, only normal DVI.
    Reply
  • Visor4 - Tuesday, April 12, 2005 - link

    Hi abbetaka,

    I hooked up my Denon DVD-1910 to the monitor using Dell's DVI cable. The video kept switching on and off. I'm assuming this is because Dell uses an 18-pin DVI cable, whereas the DVD player requires a 24-pin cable. When the video was visible, picture quality was excellent (the same as playing a PC DVD player like WinDVD, although my Denon has better deinterlacing). Unfortunately, the red drift artifacts were still visible.

    I just received an exchange unit, and much to my dismay it has the same defect. I think it's time to call Dell again, return both these units, and pick up a 2001FP before they disappear.

    Visor
    Reply
  • abbetaka - Thursday, April 07, 2005 - link

    The article states, "According to the technical documentation, the Genesis gm5321 is HDCP capable – so you should be able to hook up a DVI-HDCP receiver or DVD player to the monitor without worries."

    ... Has anyone confirmed that HDCP does work on this? I took the link to the gm5321 document, and it says...

    Ultra-Reliable DVI[tm] Input (gm5321)
    * Operating up to 165 MHz (up to UXGA 60Hz)
    * Direct connect to all DVI-compliant digital transmitters
    * High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection (HDCP)
    Note: HDCP function is available in gm5221H version only.

    ... That's the only mention of gm5221 in the whole doc though. Does it mean the gm5321 doesn't do HDCP at all? Or just that gm5221s other than the -h don't? Or.. ..? I'm not sure how to interpret it.

    I'm considering getting a DVI outputting DVD player but I don't have a TV and would rather not go to the trouble if this LCD won't do HDCP.

    Anybody? Bueller?

    Thx...
    Reply
  • Visor4 - Tuesday, April 05, 2005 - link

    This artifact definately shows up in other movies and media. It's hard not to miss.

    I suspect that I have a defective monitor, and even Anandtech's review clearly shows this bleeding effect on the Matrix screenshot:

    http://www.anandtech.com/displays/showdoc.aspx?i=2...

    Look at Keanu's right inner ear (well, the left inner ear from our point of view) and the right (left) part of his upper lip. Notice how there's a very strong hue of red on those parts? That's an example of what I see, but mine is more exaggerated when people and objects are moving.

    Does anybody else see this artifact when watching movies? I have Dell sending me another 1905FP as an exchange so I'll verify if the entire line has this problem. If so, I think I might pick up a 2001FP while they're still available and see how an IPS panel performs compared to this VA panel.

    Visor
    Reply
  • Visor4 - Sunday, April 03, 2005 - link

    Hi Kristopher,

    Could you please explain what "red shift" means? I just received a 1905FP, and while I was watching a Sex and the City episode I noticed a red drift/shift type of artifact. It was as if the red colour was lagging behind everything else. It was easiest to see under their noses, like they were all getting nosebleeds. Other than that, I haven't really seen this "drift" in other media. I'll keep watching and let everyone know.

    Thanks,
    Visor
    Reply
  • goldsheet - Saturday, April 02, 2005 - link

    Recently bought one for $317 (after 40% off coupon) and am quite satisfied for business applications. Video and gaming not a priority for me. Reply
  • falcc - Monday, March 14, 2005 - link

    I just recieved mine as well. It was 20% off so it was a fantastic price when you compare it to the Samsung. Movies aren't great on it but I'm quite happy with the quality in games. I've come from a CRT and this is my first LCD. When I first played HL2 on it I wasn't overly pleased but after adjusting the brightness etc. it is now great. Reply
  • tscholz - Thursday, March 03, 2005 - link

    Just bought this monitor, everything looks perfect. There is very little ghosting, and the contrast is very good. Like #54, video is very blocky when playing DivX/XviD/whatever. But I think this because of the lack of blooming in LCD screens, artifacts of movies are more visible. Can't see any other way a monitor can affect video playback.

    The reason i bought it, was in part bacause of this article, and that is uses the same panel as the Samsung 139P. But while being as good as the Samsung 139P, it costs less.
    Reply

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