How to Pick a Good LCD

Picking an LCD goes well beyond brand recognition. Below, we have a small introduction to a few different facets of shopping for an LCD - in our order of importance. Generally, we find a price point and then choose an LCD based on the properties detailed below. For example, if we only have $500 to spend, we consider all of the monitors for $500 or less and go through the following checklist.

Input Type: DVI, DVI, DVI. We insist that when you buy a new LCD monitor, you buy a model with DVI capability. Even if you don't want to buy a DVI-capable video card right now, it is still a wise decision to get a DVI-compatible LCD. When DVI first appeared in the industry, there were a few issues with the quality of the connectors and thus, sometimes viewing a signal over a DVI connector would give you a worse signal than over a 15-pin D-Sub connector. However, in the last 3 or 4 years, most of those problems have been fixed, and virtually every new video card is more than capable of producing a clean digital signal. None of the LCDs that we review today (except the Samsung 910V) are limited to only analog connectors, but be aware that they exist.

Resolution, Aspect Ratio: If you buy a 4:3 LCD, the resolution had better be 4:3 as well. That is, a 19" LCD should have an aspect ratio of 1600x1200, 1280x960, or some derivative thereof. Most 19" and 17" LCDs have an aspect ratio of 5:4 (1280x1024). This is OK, but you're looking at a 5:4 signal crammed in a 4:3 box. Our Dell 2001FP, on the other hand, measures exactly 16" by 12" and runs at a resolution of 1600x1200. Generally, a skew aspect ratio is not enough to notice, but if you do any sort of graphic work, all of your circles will look like ovals. This goes the same for widescreen LCDs - buy a widescreen LCD with a widescreen resolution; a 30" wide format LCD with a resolution of 1024x768 will not look correct no matter what you do to the signal.

Response Time: Response time is an unusual preference and always a trade off. Typical response time (TrTf - Time rising, Time falling) refers to the time that it takes the LCD subpixel to twist from the fully "on" position to the fully "off" position and then back again. Response time has absolutely nothing to do with framerate. Pixel response times are independent of each other, and it does not take the entire screen 25ms to refresh if a monitor is labeled as a 25ms response time LCD. The time that it takes the LCD to go from black to white may be 15ms while the time that it takes the LCD to go from black back to white may be 10ms. Furthermore, your monitor is generally rendering a color that is not on end of the color spectrum. The time that it takes your LCD subpixel to twist from one half of a tone to another may be more or less than 15ms. The TrTf response time is normally a pretty useless measurement - but it makes for an easy specification in which to market LCDs.

The second method in measuring response time is "gray-to-gray" (GTG) response time. The measurement of GTG response time is actually more useful to LCD buyers, but it is harder to convey and is usually just conveyed as one number (which is incorrect). Gray to Gray response time refers to the time that it takes for a pixel to twist from some arbitrary position to another. On a 6-bit LCD, that's the time it takes the subpixel to twist from 1 of 64 different positions to one of the other 63 positions. GTG response times are useful if the manufacturer expresses the average of all the GTG response times, but that is rarely the case.

Everyone's preferences on response time are different. If you play a lot of games and feel that the few ms difference between a 6-bit LCD and an 8-bit LCD are worthwhile, then it's a worthy investment. Most people can't tell the difference - and that's not just most people who aren't gamers, but most people in general have to be shown the differences between two displays that differ by single digit transient response times.

Index How to Pick a Good LCD (continued)
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  • xann - Monday, January 14, 2008 - link

    it is like:
    640*480 1 :1
    800*600 1,25 :1,25
    1024*768 1,6 :1,6
    1152*864 1,8 :1,8
    1280*1024 2 :2,13

    1600*1200 2,5 :2,5

    1440*900 2,25 :1,87
    1680*1050 2,625 :2,1875
    1920*1200 3 :2,5
    2560*1600 4 :3,33333

    wide screen resolutions are not one on one.
    i look for 19" LCD with res 1600*1200

    Reply
  • xann - Monday, January 14, 2008 - link

    it is like:
    640*480 1 :1
    800*600 1,25 :1,25
    1024*768 1,6 :1,6
    1152*864 1,8 :1,8
    1280*1024 2 :2,13

    1600*1200 2,5 :2,5


    1440*900 2,25 :1,87
    1680*1050 2,625 :2,1875
    1920*1200 3 :2,5
    2560*1600 4 :3,33333
    Reply
  • Cay - Friday, December 17, 2004 - link

    One of the main reasons I think PVA is in a completely different league regarding response time compared to TN/IPS, is this guide by X-Bit Labs.

    http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/other/display/lcd...
    Reply
  • Cay - Friday, December 17, 2004 - link

    The tips at the start were great though, and pointed out several important things I'd have overlooked otherwise. Reply
  • Cay - Friday, December 17, 2004 - link

    This review wasn't very useful to me, frankly. It contains too much subjective talk, and barely any data. I miss the following:

    .) For each panel, clearly state the technology used (TN, M/PVA, IPS), as well as if it's 8 or 6 bit. This gives more meaningful information than all the manufacturer specs.

    .) Screen photographs of select, demanding images taken under the same conditions. Here, I want to see how each image looks like on EACH screen, not just 3 samples total.

    Printer reviews do this well. You can dedicate one HTML page for each test image (eg 1 for the Max Payne scene, 1 for the Morrowind pic), and put the results from different monitors right below each other. This would allow me to directly compare how still images look like. At the end of the image block, you can put your comments.

    With well-chosen test images, this might give a pretty complete idea of how good a monitor's still image/color quality/contrast is.

    .) A meaningful measurement of response time.
    When you claim to "not notice any difference" between a PVA and a TN panel, I have to conclude that the Anandtech crew is much less sensitive to response time than most people. That's great for you, but bad for me - I'm not getting any response time information.

    Build a device to measure all gray-black or grey-grey response times. Tom's Hardware and X-Bit have some you can use for inspiration.

    Just including this measurement does not mean that you have to emphasize its importance. You can put it in a section together with your subjective response time interpretation.
    Reply
  • 610 - Tuesday, December 14, 2004 - link

    Is the NuTech L921G currently available in the US?

    The article says that the review unit was not store-bought, but doesn't specify how it was obtained. I've found only one site anywhere that claims to sell it, and it's not listed in any of the usual price-comparison sites (like PriceScan, for example).
    Reply
  • KristopherKubicki - Monday, December 13, 2004 - link

    ecove:

    I believe all of the monitors you mentioned use the same AUO panel. Performance will be very similar.

    Hope that helps,

    Kristopher
    Reply
  • ecove - Thursday, December 09, 2004 - link

    I've noticed in researching 19" LCDs that there are a number of models from various manufacturers (eg Princeton LCD19D, CTX S962A/G, Advueu ADV190DT) that all share what appear to be identical specs to the Nu and Viewsonic models reviewed here. Is it a safe assumption that these monitors all share the same panel and have essentially the same performance? Reply
  • stephenbrooks - Tuesday, December 07, 2004 - link

    That sample blue image on the penultimate page really made me worry about the LCD I'm using to view it here because it looked terribly dithered! Fortunately I realised the image you showed there was actually a 256-colour GIF (?!) of the image you should have used.
    Reply
  • R3MF - Tuesday, December 07, 2004 - link

    @ #69 -
    agreed, i would like to see what the Dell 1905FP is like too.........

    @ #87 -
    yes, the Dell 1905FP is rated at 20ms, and while it may not be best for games like UT2k4, but what about games like Mafia and Rome: TW where twitch gaming is irrelevant?

    REMF
    Reply

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