March of 2000 marked a very interesting time for AMD and Intel; just two days apart, each company broke the 1GHz barrier with an extremely high priced, low yield, barely available CPU – and users stood in awe.  Today, Intel quietly introduces a Pentium 4 running at 3.8GHz, and the excitement is nowhere to be found. 

Maybe it’s that the 3.8GHz clock speed is hidden behind the 570J model number.  Maybe it’s that our latest benchmarks have shown that it’d take much more than 3.8GHz for Intel to truly regain the performance crown.  Or maybe it’s the cancellation of the 4GHz Pentium 4 that has robbed the 3.8GHz model’s 15 minutes of fame.  Then again, this isn’t the first time we’ve reviewed a speed-bump without getting too excited, so maybe business is just as usual.

The Intel Pentium 4 570J is the topic of discussion today; the 570 represents a Prescott core clocked at 3.8GHz, an increase of 200MHz over the Pentium 4 560.  The Pentium 4 570J will fit in at the $637 price point (in 1K unit quantities), and will be faced with limited initial availability. 

Since the CPU is labeled using Intel’s model numbering system it is meant for LGA-775 platforms only, which is in line with Intel’s plan to bring the Socket-478 platform to an end very soon.  The J-suffix simply indicates support for Intel’s Execute Disable Bit (EDB), identical to AMD’s NX bit.

Enabled (on Windows) through Service Pack 2, EDB and NX prevent programs from executing malicious code contained within various parts of memory.  We’ve talked briefly about EDB/NX here on AnandTech, and Microsoft also has an informative page on the specifics of Service Pack 2’s support for the technologies

Architecturally, other than the inclusion of EDB support, the Pentium 4 570J remains unchanged from all previous Prescott based CPUs.  If you want to understand a bit more about Prescott’s architecture be sure to read our extensive coverage of the technology and improvements/shortcomings of Intel’s flagship core. But if you’re already up to speed, let’s get right to it.

Testing EDB Functionality
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  • pplapeu - Wednesday, November 17, 2004 - link

    why do you no longer overclock?

    you know users will do that. What if this processor was dialed up 10%, it would clock at 4.18Ghz and could run faster. I think the performance tales would be far different.
    Reply
  • Staples - Monday, November 15, 2004 - link

    Well the CEO did step down a few days ago. I hope we see better management soon. This is an embarrasment for Intel. Ever since the A64 came out, Intel has been releasing backseat products. Reply
  • IntelUser2000 - Monday, November 15, 2004 - link

    No, its that most of you guys are AMD biased. Say Intel does release a high-performing Pentium M architecture based chip. Then you guys will just shut up and say nothing else. If AMD comes with 5% performance lead, AMD is thought of as GOD or something. Probably even greater. And about BTX, Pentium M does run pretty cool, but at 21W, that was equal to initial 0.18 micron P3's. Actually some of the DESKTOP P3's had ~15W TDP. I heard 286's and 386's had less than 5W TDP. Cooler, and faster is always better. Granted you may not need as much if your processor runs hotter, but still its necessary. It's also mentioned that since quiet PCs are gaining popularity, BTX can help a lot since it will allow graphics cards to have smaller fans.

    Another 3.8GHz P4 link: http://www.tomshardware.com/cpu/20041115/index.htm...

    Quite contrary to their 3.6GHz throttling article, they seem positive towards 3.8GHz P4.
    Reply
  • fawifewaewaf - Sunday, November 10, 2013 - link

    diaff cretin Reply
  • mlittl3 - Monday, November 15, 2004 - link

    #35,

    Do you know that the long post of #21 is the author of the article you just read (which is way longer than any post) and the owner of Anandtech? Do you see the post is from ANAND Lal Shimpi? And that his post was in response to the other long post which Anand saw as important enough to respond to.

    I enjoy all the comments on this site, long and short. It gives readers a sort of "behind the scenes" look at hardware and software. I think there should be no restrictions as it currently stands.

    Keep 'em coming. Go Anandtech :)
    Reply
  • bob661 - Monday, November 15, 2004 - link

    Based on #32's link, it would seem that the P4's would decrease in performance during sustained use with an average user. So unless you're an enthusiast, you would not see the full performance of any of the new P4's. Reply
  • Alphafox78 - Monday, November 15, 2004 - link

    There should be a size limit on posts... Reply
  • GTMan - Monday, November 15, 2004 - link

    Does the EDB functionality lower system performance when it is turned on? Reply
  • Auteur - Monday, November 15, 2004 - link

    #12:

    The only reason HardOCP uses DVD2AVI in their bench marking suite is its the only Divx front end that runs faster on AMD cpu's than Intel's. Its a dead app (the author no longer updates it) that can't IVTC, deinterlace, clean or sharpen video. Its great for demuxing audio and thats it.

    Intel's chips dominate when you use the popular front ends like AutoGK, Gordian Knot or Xmpeg. Read Doom9's forum if you don't believe me.
    Reply
  • langles - Monday, November 15, 2004 - link

    Did you read the article at Tom's Hardware this weekend about the thermal issues with the Pentium 4 3.6 GHz?

    http://www.tomshardware.com/cpu/20041114/index.htm...
    "The Heat Can Cause Intel's P4 To Throttle And Damage Over Time"

    I would expect that this issue is even worse for the 3.8 GHz.
    Reply

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