CPU Web Tests

One of the issues when running web-based tests is the nature of modern browsers to automatically install updates. This means any sustained period of benchmarking will invariably fall foul of the 'it's updated beyond the state of comparison' rule, especially when browsers will update if you give them half a second to think about it. Despite this, we were able to find a series of commands to create an un-updatable version of Chrome 56 for our 2017 test suite. While this means we might not be on the bleeding edge of the latest browser, it makes the scores between CPUs comparable.

All of our benchmark results can also be found in our benchmark engine, Bench.

SunSpider 1.0.2: link

The oldest web-based benchmark in this portion of our test is SunSpider. This is a very basic javascript algorithm tool, and ends up being more a measure of IPC and latency than anything else, with most high-performance CPUs scoring around about the same. The basic test is looped 10 times and the average taken. We run the basic test 4 times.

Web: SunSpider on Chrome 56

Mozilla Kraken 1.1: link

Kraken is another Javascript based benchmark, using the same test harness as SunSpider, but focusing on more stringent real-world use cases and libraries, such as audio processing and image filters. Again, the basic test is looped ten times, and we run the basic test four times.

Web: Mozilla Kraken 1.1 on Chrome 56

Google Octane 2.0: link

Along with Mozilla, as Google is a major browser developer, having peak JS performance is typically a critical asset when comparing against the other OS developers. In the same way that SunSpider is a very early JS benchmark, and Kraken is a bit newer, Octane aims to be more relevant to real workloads, especially in power constrained devices such as smartphones and tablets.

Web: Google Octane 2.0 on Chrome 56

WebXPRT 2015: link

While the previous three benchmarks do calculations in the background and represent a score, WebXPRT is designed to be a better interpretation of visual workloads that a professional user might have, such as browser based applications, graphing, image editing, sort/analysis, scientific analysis and financial tools.

Web: WebXPRT 15 on Chrome 56

Overall, all of our web benchmarks show a similar trend. Very few web frameworks offer multi-threading – the browsers themselves are barely multi-threaded at times – so Threadripper's vast thread count is underutilized. What wins the day on the web are a handful of fast cores with high single-threaded performance.

Benchmarking Performance: CPU Rendering Tests Benchmarking Performance: CPU Encoding Tests
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  • Zoeff - Thursday, August 10, 2017 - link

    Yeeeees! Thanks for the review! I was hoping there'd be an embargo lift at this hour. :D Reply
  • EloiseSheppard - Saturday, August 12, 2017 - link

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    Reply
  • Zingam - Sunday, August 13, 2017 - link

    The best CPUs for MineSweeper in 2017 in a single article!!!! Reply
  • NikosD - Monday, August 14, 2017 - link

    Anandtech is simply wrong regarding Game mode or "Legacy Compatibility Mode" as you prefer to call it and make jokes about it.

    It seems that you don't know what ALL other reviewers say that Game mode doesn't set SMT off, but it disables one die.

    So, Threadripper doesn't become a 16C/16T CPU after enabling Game mode as you say, but a 8C/16T CPU like ALL other reviewers say.

    Go read Tom's Hardware which says that Game mode executes "bcdedit /set numproc XX" in order to cut 8 cores and shrink the CPU to one die (8C/16T) but because that's a software restriction the memory and PCIe controller of the second die is still alive, giving Quad Channel memory support and full 60+4 PCIe lanes even in Game mode.

    And you thought you are smart and funny regarding your Game mode comments...
    Reply
  • Dr. Swag - Thursday, August 10, 2017 - link

    In paragraph two you say Ryzen 3 has double the threads of i3, I think you mean to say double the cores :) Reply
  • IanHagen - Thursday, August 10, 2017 - link

    Not trying to nitpick or imply anything but... There is a logical reason for Threadripper getting five pages of gaming performance review and Skylake-X not even appearing on the charts more than a month after it was reviewed? Reply
  • Ian Cutress - Thursday, August 10, 2017 - link

    Bottom of page one. Reply
  • IanHagen - Thursday, August 10, 2017 - link

    With all due respect Mr. Cutress, "circumstances beyond our control" and "odd BIOS/firmware gaming results" didn't prevent anyone from bashing Ryzen for its gaming performance on its debut. Reply
  • Ian Cutress - Thursday, August 10, 2017 - link

    We didn't post gaming performance for Ryzen at launch either, for similar reasons. Reply
  • bongey - Thursday, August 10, 2017 - link

    Stop lying , you commented on gaming performance in your conclusion, without even benchmarking it in gaming.
    That is much worse.
    Reply

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