Originally released in 2014, NZXT's H440 chassis has quickly become a popular product for the company. Due to this popularity NZXT has released a few different designs over the years, ranging from the original pure white design to alternative designs such as a Razer-partnered black and green chassis. For Computex, NZXT has announced another new version of its H440 PC chassis, the EnVyUs edition, which will get a black, white and blue color scheme.

The new version of the H440 was a collaboration by NZXT and Team EnVyUs, a professional e-Sports team that NZXT sponsors and thus this new design will feature the e-Sports team branding. The case features team colors, aesthetics. and the logotype of the team on the front panel. The NZXT H440 EnVyUs was designed primarily for gamers, e-Sport fans who respect the team as well as those, who wanted this particular chassis, but with black, white and blue color scheme. Apart from the colors, the new NZXT H440 mid-tower case is identical to its predecessors. It is made of steel and plastic and is compatible with ATX, Micro-ATX and Mini-ITX motherboards.

NZXT H440 EnVyUs
Motherboard Size ATX, Micro-ATX, Mini-ITX
Drive Bays External 0 × 5.25"
Internal 11 × 3.5" and 8 x 2.5"
Cooling Front 2 × 140 mm or 3 × 120 mm (3 × 120 mm included)
Rear 1 × 120 mm or 1 × 140 mm (included)
Top 2 × 140 mm or 3 × 120 mm
HDD/Side -
Bottom -
Radiator Support Front Unknown
Rear Up to 140 mm (?)
Top Up to 360 mm
Side -
Bottom -
I/O Port 2 × USB 3.0, 2 × USB 2.0, 1 × Headphone, 1 × Mic
Power Supply Size ATX
Dimensions W: 220mm × H: 513mm × D: 480mm
Features of the NZXT H440 EnVyUs · Glass side panel
· Integrated power supply shroud
· NZXT FNv2 case fans with anti-vibration pads
Price $139.99

Inside, the H440 chassis features seven openings for PCI expansion cards, up to eight 2.5” bays for SSDs/HDDs and up to eleven 3.5” bays for storage devices. It also supports two 140 mm or three 120 mm front fans, two 140 mm or three 120 mm top fans as well as one 140mm or 120 mm rear fan. Users can install graphics cards that are up to 428 mm long (if no storage devices are installed on their place) or up to 294 mm long when the case is fully populated with HDDs or SSDs. Like other modern chassis, the NZXT H440 EnVyUs fully supports the installation of liquid cooling. Outside, the H440 has two USB 2.0 ports, two USB 3.0 ports as well as two 3.5 mm mini-jack connectors.

The NZXT H440 EnVyUs will be available in the U.S. and Europe in mid-June. The recommended price will be $139.99.

Source: NZXT

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  • DanNeely - Friday, June 10, 2016 - link

    For a new case USB2 only ports are starting to feel dated. An IMO better option for supporting cheaper boards with only a single 3.x header would be to bundle an adapter for the internal cable to connect it to a 2.0 header. Reply
  • tomchak - Friday, June 10, 2016 - link

    Totally agree with the USB comment. That seems like a huge miss. Reply
  • RussianSensation - Friday, June 10, 2016 - link

    How many USB 3.0 case ports do you need? A lot of Z170 boards already have 6-10 USB 3.0/3.1 ports. This case has 2x USB 3.0:

    2 × USB 3.0, 2 × USB 2.0, 1 × Headphone, 1 × Mic
    Reply
  • Flunk - Friday, June 10, 2016 - link

    All of them, all of the ports IN THE WORLD. Reply
  • Aikouka - Friday, June 10, 2016 - link

    I don't really agree with Mr. Neely either. The problem is that during my perusing of motherboards, most of them don't have more than one USB 3.0 header. That means that having two sets of USB 3.0 ports on the front would go to waste on most boards without an expansion card. However, most boards have at least one USB 2.0 header in addition to the 3.0 header.

    I do strongly believe that a case should have four USB ports on the front. I find two to be far too limiting. Although, that's partly because there are some wires that I prefer to leave plugged in most of the time and don't want them in the back.
    Reply
  • DanNeely - Friday, June 10, 2016 - link

    As many as possible. 4x front panel USB3 was a major driver in my last desktop build ~16 months ago. I've been around long enough to have "enjoyed" the USB1 to USB2 transition; having to worry about which port I'm using to avoid being bombarded by "this device could work better if plugged into a faster port" notices isn't something I ever want to deal with again. Looking to the future, I have a case with a front panel IO in a standard size 3.5" module so that I'll be able to move to C ports without a major investment when the time comes. Reply
  • BurntMyBacon - Tuesday, June 14, 2016 - link

    I use 4xUSB3.0 on the chassis myself and would spend up for a USB3.0 expansion card to support it if my motherboard did not. However, I don't think 4xUSB3.0 on the front of a chassis is a universally good solution.

    @DanNeely: "I've been around long enough to have "enjoyed" the USB1 to USB2 transition; having to worry about which port I'm using to avoid being bombarded by "this device could work better if plugged into a faster port" notices isn't something I ever want to deal with again."

    I was there. I feel your pain. However, I think the solution you proposed will actually subject more people to this issue than save them from it:

    @@DanNeely: "An IMO better option for supporting cheaper boards with only a single 3.x header would be to bundle an adapter for the internal cable to connect it to a 2.0 header."

    USB3.0 ports are now usually color coded. USB2.0 and earlier are typically black. Blue for USB3.0. Cyan for USB3.1, but that's not relevant here. Granted not every motherboard manufacturer subscribes to this, but it is pretty easy to make sure your chassis does before you buy. Consider a chassis that has 4xUSB3.0 up front and an adapter for a USB2.0 port on a motherboard that doesn't have 2 USB3.0 headers. You now have 4 blue USB ports. They all look like USB3.0 ports. Only half of them are. Just like in the USB1 to USB2 transition, you plug in your device into what you think is the correct port only to get the "this device could work better if plugged into a faster port" notice. Only this time it is twice as frustrating, because there is a reasonable expectation that the port should be correct due to color code. The fact that there are still far more motherboards with one USB3.0 header than two of them means that you'll be subjecting many more people to this issue than if you left two of the ports as USB2.0 only with the corresponding color (black) to guide them.

    I'd rather see them bundle both sets of ports so that I can simply trade them out if I want, but that adds a little to cost and many people aren't up for swapping out ports on the front facial of their chassis.
    Reply
  • britjh22 - Friday, June 10, 2016 - link

    Are there motherboards with more than one internal connector for USB 3.0, if not what is the point of going all USB 3.0 front ports if you are just going to connect them to USB 2.0? In fact, that would just lead to confusion with different speeds on physically identical ports. Reply
  • TheinsanegamerN - Monday, June 13, 2016 - link

    My asus p8z77 v pro from 2013 has 2 headers. High end boards have them, you just need to look for the right models. Reply
  • d0pp3lg4ng3r - Friday, June 10, 2016 - link

    In all fairness, this seems to be a new paint job on an existing case. I doubt that there was any actual redesign of the internals. Reply

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