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  • designgears - Friday, August 29, 2014 - link

    Wow, those timings! Reply
  • colinstu - Saturday, August 30, 2014 - link

    I remember when DDR2 came out and everyone freaked out about the timings compared to DDR. Reply
  • Metroid - Monday, September 01, 2014 - link

    I think he meant = awesome timings compared to ddr3 when it came out, for example, when ddr3 came, a good ddr2 used to be "G.SKILL, DDR2 1066 (PC2 8500) Timing 5-5-5-15 ", ddr3 first came with 1066 mhz and latency = 9, so as earlier ddr4 versions have latencies of "PC4-17000 C16 2133MHz", this one can match the good ddr3 was "DDR4 3300mhz at 16-18-18-36, 1.35V", So these kits are awesome. Reply
  • Cravenmor - Friday, August 29, 2014 - link

    I know, right? Reply
  • SleepyFE - Friday, August 29, 2014 - link

    Now that we have such high speeds they should switch to GHz. 3.3 GHz makes more sense than 3300 MHz. I can understand they used MHz when they still made 800 MHz memory, but now it 1.3 GHz or above. Reply
  • scottrichardson - Saturday, August 30, 2014 - link

    In all my computer years, I have never really understood RAM speeds. Probably as a Mac user I am used to just buying one speed RAM - the speed that the mobo supports. However, isn't the Z99 chipset 2133MHz? How is having 3300MHz RAM going to help if the mobo 2133Mhz? Sorry for the n00b question. Reply
  • samsonjs - Saturday, August 30, 2014 - link

    It officially supports that, but can run faster. Like a CPU.

    I believe the main difference on a Mac is that there are no controls to run memory at different speeds, so it's stuck at whatever it shipped with.
    Reply
  • Morawka - Friday, August 29, 2014 - link

    crazzzy expensive compared to gskill Reply
  • Nickolai - Saturday, August 30, 2014 - link

    What is that 5-pin connector on the side? Reply
  • cactusdog - Sunday, August 31, 2014 - link

    Its for the Corsair link, to measure temps and stuff. Reply

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