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  • cknobman - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Thought Nvidia had a real killer here.

    Until I saw how crappy the screen is. On a tablet having such crappy color reproduction is just not going to cut it.
    Reply
  • ams23 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Overall the Shield tablet display is not bad but not great. The black levels, contrast ratio, and saturation accuracy are quite a bit better on Shield tablet compared to iPad Mini Retina. The max brightness and white point accuracy are slightly better on Shield tablet compared to iPad Mini Retina. The grayscale and GMB accuracy are quite a bit worse, however, and are the two areas that need some work. Reply
  • rodolfcarver - Friday, October 03, 2014 - link

    I agree that it's not bad, but the truth is that most games will be just as good on some of the top tablets (http://www.consumertop.com/best-tablets/ ), and they will also be better for all other tasks. Therefore I don't see the point of the Nvidia Shield. Reply
  • willis936 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    You must have skipped the cpu and gpu benchmarks... Reply
  • ddriver - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Color accuracy is pretty much irrelevant for gaming. Reply
  • B3an - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Well yeah, if you're a moron. Reply
  • zodiacsoulmate - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    that's mean... also you are wrong color accuracy is so irreverent in gaming... Reply
  • inighthawki - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Games already use low resolution color palettes. Textures almost never have more than 8 bits per channel (and are often compressed beyond that), and lighting calculations and sampling error is already going to produce generally "wrong" colors with respect to the real world. You're absolutely fooling yourself if you believe you will see a noticeable difference between this and a more accurate display while gaming. Reply
  • mkozakewich - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    "Games" use an incredibly varied set of graphical abilities. Maybe first-person shooters are different, and a lot of hyper-realistic AAA games in general; but there are plenty of games that are bright or cel-shaded, and those look a lot better on a screen with rich colours.

    You can't just say a display is good or bad. The reason they give us all these specs is so that we can make our own choices. Someone who plays games with muted or washed-out colours can decided that it's fine, and that this works for them based on the tradeoffs it makes.
    Reply
  • inighthawki - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    I agree there are cases, typically indie games, where this is true, but this is an incredibly small subset of the game market, and also generally not the target audience of such a device. The shield seems to be targeted more at heavy gamers, especially those who wish to stream games from a high end PC in another room. These are the people who typically have many AAA titles and games where the graphics are so complex, and the amount of estimation used to compute lighting and texture quality is off from realistic values enough to not even realize that in cases of perfect color reproduction by the display, the game could very easily have a high error from the "real world" value anyway. Reply
  • ddriver - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    What you mean by "rich colors" is OVER-SATURATION, not color accuracy but the full opposite of it. Most games actually prefer TN panels because of their fast refresh rates, and TN panels' color accuracy suks big time. Reply
  • B3an - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    I know for a fact i can see a noticeable difference. In the same way i can easily see a difference between IPS and shitty TN panels. So YOU'RE fooling yourself if you actually believe that. Reply
  • inighthawki - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    And you're showing your foolishness by comparing color accuracy to color precision. The difference between TN and IPS panels typically stems from color depth. Most TN panels are 6 bit color with dithering, while IPS panels can be 8 bit, or 10 bit simulated, producing a higher range of visible color.

    Here we are talking about the ACCURACY of colors. i.e. that shade of blue appears as (10, 24, 237) instead of (11, 28, 233). While playing a game, this kind of thing is generally unnoticeable, because you do not have a reference image or render to define what it should look like in the first place. In rare cases when you have large swatches of deep vivid colors you might notice they are a bit undersaturated, but for the most part, the lighting and texture quality in even AAA titles do not produce this kind of photorealism.
    Reply
  • ddriver - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    And in the end, it is all relative, since all humans perceive colors differently. This is not an issue for calibrating equipment, which itself can be calibrated, but the human eye is an analogue instrument and no calibration for its color reproduction currently exists.

    Color accuracy is vital only in one field - and that is content creation. I paid 7k for a "reference" screen and 4k for reference audio monitors, and exactly for that reason. But for content consumption it is irrelevant, considering most users don't even have pro-grade equipment and the content is going to be consumer on a wide range of devices, ranging from totally cr@ppy to above decent.
    Reply
  • niva - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Seriously, the color accuracy being 1% or even 10% off will really mess up your gaming experience? Color accuracy is wildly irrelevant to anyone but professionals who work in image/print/video production industries. Reply
  • dstarr3 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    I have to agree that color accuracy in gaming is a non-issue. In developing games, sure. But not in playing them. It's not like anyone is printing screenshots for work. Unless, again, you're a dev. Reply
  • ddriver - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Nah, I am not a moron, in fact I've been an artist in a AAA game studio for 6 years, so I know what I am talking about. You on the other hand might just be that, seeing your "foolproof" argumentation skills :D Reply
  • mikegonzalez2k - Wednesday, August 06, 2014 - link

    Most of these people probably aren't in the industry and hence wouldn't know such things. That is why they are consistently on here instead of working on actual projects. Especially those that comment daily. You have to wonder what they are doing with their life. I wouldn't pay them much attention. It isn't worth it. Reply
  • dcyli - Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - link

    HURR DURR, I PLAY GAMES FOR DA COLORS. DUURRR Reply
  • sherlockwing - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    If and only if you are color blind. Reply
  • Moizy - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Crappy? It's no iPad Air or Nexus 7, but it's still good. Read Josh's article from the other day where he went back to the archives and tested smartphone panels that were once awesome in their day. Just 3 years ago we were praising the contrast of SAMOLED and the great resolutions those phones had. The Shield Tablet is leaps and bounds ahead of them, in accuracy, gamut, and pixel density, and just a tier below the iPad Airs and Nexus 7s of the world. For $300 and all this tablet can do, I would highly recommend this tablet to most anyone, and still plan on getting one for work and graduate school. Reply
  • boozed - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    After reading "crappy" I was expecting a much worse result than the reality expressed in the review, so that's an exaggeration.

    I wouldn't be surprised if this screen still outperforms the majority of desktop gaming monitors out of the box.
    Reply
  • edlee - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    this soc it a powerhouse, nvidia is stupid that they do not mass produce it for mass produced products from HTC and Samsung. They made tablet GPU that is faster than Intel HD4000, which is pretty significant.

    But Nvidia doesn't have enough brand cognition for the simple consumer to know this is a killer product, not sure why you dont hear more partners for this soc.
    Reply
  • melgross - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    They do, but few manufacturers seem to want their SoC's. Reply
  • johnny_boy - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    I don't get why since they make a pretty damn compelling SoC. Sure, previous generations weren't very exciting, but those were previous generations! Reply
  • phoenix_rizzen - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Fool me once (Tegra1), shame on me.
    Fool me twice (Tegra2), shame on you.
    Fool me thrice (Tegra3), screw you!
    Fool me a fourth time (Tegra4), I'll never listen to you again.

    After all the hypocrisy and broken promises and what not from nVidia from the previous generations, is it really any wonder that no one wants to trust them again? All the big phone/tablet manufacturers are going to sit out this round and let nVidia go it alone. Maybe some smaller vendors will nibble at the line, and maybe some of them will have some successes with Tegra K1. But you won't see any major vendors using Tegra K1 until it proves itself in the market.

    If nVidia hadn't burned so many bridges with Tegras 1-3 they'd be in a better position to take on Qualcomm, Samsung, ARM, and Intel. But, even with how good this SoC may be, it's still too little, too late.

    Don't screw over your customers if you want them to be repeat customers!
    Reply
  • TheJian - Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - link

    You're mistaken. It was the only thing at google IO. In their automotive, their developer device (tango), TV, and it seems nexus tablet coming for gamers (9in IIRC).

    Too little too late? ROFL. It dominated the 805 and everything else here. Right on time is more like it. It will be in Google's Nov HTC Nexus 9 tablet at least. Mipad from xaiomi, Lenovo Thinkvision AIO 28, of course Jetson dev board also. I'm guessing A shield R2 coming shortly too with 1440x810 as the other specs that floated around showed (which clearly isn't this tablet, and it supposedly has 4GB ram, so again not this device). Small volumes right now probably prevent a dual launch of both shield products or they may wait for Denver since there is already quite a bit of interested parties using it as noted. If all you can produce goes to the above mentioned devices shield 2 may have to wait a bit.
    Reply
  • akdj - Sunday, August 03, 2014 - link

    Unfortunately, when ya want the 'power'. The promise of the 'performance'. And probably most importantly in today's mass market, it's 'efficiency'. Sure, they're flat hauling ASS in these benchmarks @ full tilt but a couple hours off the wall and you're done (with a AAA game that's the main draw to this tablet, right? --- I can't imagine the 'power' browser, or super reader or the 'AA' games I'm enjoying , Dark Room, The Room. Sometimes ya die. Maybe some car racing and if I've got the time an RPG FPS or an MMO, it's rare. In fact with my nine year old son it's 'his' time on my iDevices playing the games, the AA games that kick incredible ass but aren't AAA because they're not in a computer, console or dedicated gaming system. Laughable. I'm 43 and Ultima, Myst and Diablo A & B. Not the latest. Those were my games. Ultima online, I don't have the time nor do most 'tablet clients'. This is a niche product and an SoC with extreme limitations if you're taxing it's power. Obviously, using it as a movie watching, media browsing and light productivity....it's amazing efficiency. But, argument of color aside....we are moving to a HiDPI world with excellent color production on phones, tablets computers and TVs/4k, et al. If the screen is subjectively by the author after objective measurements confirming it.... 'Washed out' sounds lame. So does a pair of hours if I want to game a bit while on a three plus hour flight. A8 from Apple, Quallcomm NAND their 64bit architecture, significantly deeper libraries of apps, games and general interest software, Apple and Samsung, nor Google or ASUS, HTC LG or ABC going to take this risk again and it's exactly that. A speed demon you're unable to take advantage of if you're away for a charger. And a tablet plugged in = a major PITA. SoCs have to strike a balance. And with Metal/A8/Continuity and Google's response to come. Samsung's readying the new Note 4. Possible 805? With the 420, it'll fly through a helluva lot of games. And it's display is going to best the best today. The S5 from the same family. AMOLED has come a long way. IPS display with 'washed out' colors isn't appealing. Reply
  • akdj - Sunday, August 03, 2014 - link

    No edit. Wasn't supposed to be Quallcom's NAND. Rather Qualcomm and their 64 bit response to second generation 64bit A8. Cool and exciting to have the completion but yeah, burned three times it was tough to trust a fourth gen to leave the shelf without the reliability of ARM, Snapdragon and the 'A' series Apple tweaked ARM SoCs. Both dedicated AND delivering with incredible improvements. Look at Note 1-->Note 3's benches. iPhone 4-->5s. Two years and mind bending speed, efficiency and even more software ('apps') then before with more possibilities. Intel now in w/BayTrail, I'm wishing nVidia the best. I'm a fan Reply
  • ol1bit - Sunday, October 19, 2014 - link

    I know this is old, but my tf201 with a tegra 3 still plays games great! Uninstalling facebook really helped overall speed! Reply
  • UpSpin - Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - link

    The Tegra K1 is lacking an on-chip modem, thus it will always be less efficient than Qualcomm processors, which means we'll probably never see this SoC in a smartphone.
    I think we'll see much more Tegra producs with the K1, because it's really an impressive SoC. But NVidia seems to care less about the typical consumer tablets, more about their own console ecosystem (Shield) and most importantly embedded systems (cars), where NVidia has some huge partners and the Tegra gets widely used. (Tesla, Mercedes, VW, Audi, ...). There they can make more money most probably and don't have to give their IP away for free more or less to remain competive against companies like Mediatek.
    Reply
  • fivefeet8 - Thursday, July 31, 2014 - link

    The Snapdragon 805 is also in the same boat without an on-chip modem. Reply
  • Knowname - Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - link

    who cares about the display? I get mine on Tuesday (preordered from Amaizon and picked no rush shipping fo da bling xD) and 90% of the time I'll be using it to play steam games on my TV. Reply
  • happycamperjack - Wednesday, September 03, 2014 - link

    Just got it. The screen is actually pretty good! Much better than I expected. Great contrast, black level, colors. It's more than good enough for a tablet. I got the original Nexus 7. This is much much much better than that! It looks similar to me to the new Nexus 7. Reply
  • sherlockwing - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    No Video playback battery life test? Reply
  • JoshHo - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    It was definitely planned but there wasn't enough time to finish that test. I'll update the review once I have those results. Reply
  • ams23 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Josh, how about some additional tests using the battery saver mode? Limiting fps to 30fps and reducing CPU clock operating frequencies should dramatically extend the gaming battery life with very graphically intensive benchmarks.

    On a side note, I should point out that not only does Tegra K1 have much higher Onscreen performance in GFXBench T-Rex HD test (which is the test used for battery lifetime and a minimum value long term performance data point) compared to most other ultra mobile GPU's, but is also renders with significantly higher [FP32] precision too. According to Oleg at B3D forum, Kishonti uses low precision FP16 shaders in the T-Rex test by default. Mobile Kepler and other modern day PC and console GPU architectures are designed for FP32 precision and not mixed or lower precision.
    Reply
  • mkozakewich - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    This! It's horrible to complain about the extra dynamic range like it's a bad thing, and then NOT test the battery-saving features.

    Limit the CPU such that it runs like the Shield portable, then set the framerate to 30 Hz and run the gaming battery tests again.

    (On my Surface Pro, for example, I'll set everything to the lowest possible, about 800 MHz, and I'll get a couple more hours out of it while playing games. High-Performance mode is for when you're plugged in.)
    Reply
  • JoshHo - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Those are definitely planned as well, there were some issues with meeting deadlines so battery life testing had to be cut down somewhat. Reply
  • surbringer - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Have you tried to run PPSSPP on it ? Reply
  • kyuu - Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - link

    I can run PPSSPP on my Venue 8 Pro, and the K1 in this tablet is certainly much more powerful GPU-wise than Bay Trail. Shouldn't be an issue. Reply
  • Johnny_k - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Correction: you now can use Gamestream outside your house, (even over lte on the lte tablet version)

    Remotely access your PC to play your games away from your home.

    http://shield.nvidia.com/play-pc-games/
    Note that it is in beta
    Reply
  • RoninX - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    I'd love to see Anandtech do a real-world test on how well Gamestream works with the Shield outside the home. Reply
  • chizow - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Yes, unfortunate AT did not cover this at all, as I also recently found out GameStream remote was in beta. This is really the killer-app for Shield until Android gaming takes off (if it ever does). I would consider buying one of these if Remote GameStream worked decently well, but I'll probably hold off on either a Shield Portable 2 (with TK1) or a good GeForce bundle with Maxwell. Reply
  • ams23 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    I am impressed that Shield tablet has even higher graphics performance in GFXBench 3.0 T-Rex HD Offscreen than the actively cooled Surface Pro 2 and Surface Pro 3: http://images.anandtech.com/graphs/graph8296/65868...

    Note that thermal throttling behavior on Shield tablet is extremely good. There was virtually no throttling until after 115 runs (!) with the GFXBench 3.0 T-Rex HD benchmark: http://images.anandtech.com/doci/8296/TRexRunDownG...

    I suspect that the 3dmark Unlimited scores are CPU-limited to some extent. Shield tablet already achieves > 200 fps on game test 1 and > 100 fps on game test 2, so this particular test is not very stressful (relatively speaking) for this GPU.

    The web browsing battery life is pretty good all things considered, especially compared to iPad Mini Retina and iPad Air (which have 23% and 64% more battery capacity, respectively than Shield tablet). The Shield tablet has CPU and browser performance that is at least 2x faster than Nexus 7 2013 variant, so the web browsing efficiency is actually quite good in comparison.

    Reply
  • UpSpin - Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - link

    agreed, those results are impressive and a huge step forward, for both NVidia and all the others.
    Considering that the Shield uses the ancient quad core 32-bit Cortex A15 variant of the Tegra K1 and NVidia also has a custom dual core 64-bit variant of the K1 I think we can expect a further CPU boost once this 64-bit SoC reaches customers.
    Reply
  • jospoortvliet - Thursday, July 31, 2014 - link

    The A15r3 is not exactly ancient but I agree that Denver is something to look forward to 😎 Reply
  • Anonymous Blowhard - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    >Games like Saints Row 3 played as if running on a console

    So, 720p30, Low Detail? ;)
    Reply
  • Death666Angel - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Zing! :D Reply
  • Stuka87 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    I think the tablet on its own is decent. Although it is very heavy for its size (Which BTW this review does not mention its weight anywhere).

    The controller is what I end up scratching my head over. In their release photos they show a girl gaming with the tablet, but sitting like 3ft away. As if being that far away would be enjoyable.

    One other thing that is not clear, if the tablet is NOT on wifi, will the controller still work? The article makes it sound like you have to be on wifi.
    Reply
  • Friendly0Fire - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    WiFi *Direct* is a straight connection between the tablet and the controller using the WiFI protocol. It most certainly doesn't need a network to work. Reply
  • Stuka87 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Hm, ok. But he specifically said it depends what type of wifi network you are on. Reply
  • lmcd - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    That's for the connection band. Meaning that if one of the two Wi-Fi bands is in use for Wi-Fi, then the other one is the one that'll be used for the Wi-Fi direct. Reply
  • halca - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Really? That's it for the directstylus review section? I'm disappointed. I hoped to see more comparison between the old and new, and compared to wacom's tech on samsung note line. Reply
  • scbundy - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Shame about the screen, but with my old Nexus 7 broken and me looking for a gaming tablet replacement, this one appears to fit the bill perfectly. Especially since my gaming PC has a 780 GTX. Can't wait to try it out. Reply
  • dabotsonline - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    "In essence, this device is already ready to serve as an Android TV device."

    I thought that Google are mandating a very specific UI design for Android TV devices - one which is very different from this? Do you have any inside info regarding the final version this fall / autumn, Josh?
    Reply
  • aamir147 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    I think he means nvidia can eventually add an android TV mode when connecting via hdmi just like you can get a console mode. Reply
  • SpartyOn - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Personally, I love my Shield Portable (or whatever they're calling the 1st Gen device). Sitting in bed or on the couch streaming the game I just turned off at my desk is fantastic. It's also the best Android emulator device out there.

    The recent updates to allow outside the home streaming (which this article incorrectly states as only allowing in-home; please change) and 1080p Console Mode streaming via wired Ethernet, have made this a killer mobile gaming device. Instead of carting my mITX build back and forth when I want to play a game via controller on my HDTV, I can now simply hook up the Shield and stream the game, in full 1080p, to the TV and can hook up an XBOX 360 wireless controller with USB OTG. No more hauling a computer around the house or having to settle for a laptop! Seriously awesome.

    My wife and I continuously fight to use the Shield when heading to bed, she for her emulators and me for streaming from my gaming rig. I REALLY want to pick up another one so that she can have her own, so I was hoping this was going to be a self-contained device like the 1st Gen, just with the K1 and maybe some weight balancing, an extra miniUSB port, and a 6" screen with less bezel (the bezel with the 5" is HUGE and I'm sure they could creatively get a slightly bigger screen in there).

    Unfortunately, the new Shield device as a tablet is... underwhelming. Sure it has snazzy bells n' whistles for a tablet, but with the larger form factor and lack of handholding ease, this really kills a lot of its portability. I prefer the fully contained controller/screen of the original; plus, it was different and really created a new market. Now it's just another tablet in a crowded field. Seems like a dumb strategy to me.

    Until they release a refreshed Shield Portable with the K1, I'll be keeping my money. Kudos to NVIDIA though for the 1st Gen device - I love it.
    Reply
  • fivefeet8 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Unfortunately, you're probably in the minority at this point and I do understand why some would prefer it that way. One of the reasons I didn't get the original shield is because you couldn't do much else with it besides gaming. Even though I loved the hardware and software, I wanted something that could encompass more. Something I could use for both work and play on mobile. The new Shield Tablet fits that almost perfectly. Reply
  • SpartyOn - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    I guess it depends on your setup or what steps you're willing to take. I have an Asus Z77 wifi mobo so I use the Asus Wifi Go app a lot, which allows me remote desktop access and mirroring in an easy package. Haven't invested in a Bluetooth mouse or keyboard, but using USB OTG has worked out just fine for times I've hooked the Shield up to a monitor with M&K.

    I've done some video editing in Adobe Premiere remotely this way, along with working with Excel files, so I'd say it can actually do work just fine. Does it require some additional cables/accessories to maximize that professional potential? Sure, but then again, I'm not going to be doing any serious work on an 8" Shield tablet without hooking it up to a monitor as well.
    Reply
  • fivefeet8 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Much of the activities I do require me to be away from the home so a shield with a gamepad attached to the screen would be a bit awkward. The tablet fits more with my requirements. Reply
  • SpartyOn - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    I think there's room for both devices for those that buy into the Nvidia brand and who understand/utilize the gaming features; however, the tablet space is a very competitive market for Nvidia to try and enter, with numerous players, especially for work and professional devices.

    An additional thought on the gaming side, since this really is the target audience: Does it pass the eye test? If I'm a gamer, and I see someone with a 1st gen Shield, I immediately know that it's a gaming device and might inquire what it is. I also can look at pics when shopping and know that it's a gaming device. If I see someone using the 2nd gen Shield, I just see another tablet out in the wild and when shopping online, it would have to come down to specs/features comparisons.

    I guess the overall point I'm trying to make is this: the original Shield was so insanely different that over time it had a chance to succeed, especially with yearly refreshes. Now it's just another tablet that can't even stand up on its own (literally and figuratively) ... how do I balance a tablet in bed or on the couch (or in a plane, train, car?!) when I have to fiddle with a controller and the screen itself. Seems cumbersome for gaming to me and in my opinion actually makes you MORE tethered to a stationary external monitor/HDTV instead of the handheld.
    Reply
  • fivefeet8 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    If there is enough demand for another Shield1 type device, then you may yet see it, but from what's been gathered, there wasn't. Although I do find it also an interesting device, the gamepad agnostic nature of the Tablet gives a better experience with 3rd party pads. Some of which are attachable albeit a bit weight slanted. And it gives console mode an advantage of not having to use another controller. Reply
  • aamir147 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    I believe the tablet is just another addition to the shield family, this is not to replace the shield portable. This is what the mod in the nvidia blog said. Reply
  • savagemike - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    It would be trivial to make a frame to hold the tablet and controller together for use as you'd like. Meanwhile I was never attracted to the first Shield because gaming is not my number 1 interest - just something that would be a nice bonus.
    What I'm saying is this more modular approach could easily be made to work as the original Shield but the original Shield cannot be made to work as a stand-alone tablet. So for me this is a much better design.
    Especially with the advent of 3d printing. It will only take one clever person to design something to hold the tablet and controller together to mimic the original. If you don't see it pop up soon for easy purchase then it isn't that wanted as it would be simple to do.
    Reply
  • Knowname - Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - link

    I think you should consider the directstylus modes. I'm sure the wife (if the tablet isn't too heavy) would love that. lus she could read and do other tablet stuffs... if she can get around the horribly dull screen ofc. Reply
  • schizoide - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    You can pick up a refurb Nexus 7 (2013) for $140 from an authorized seller on eBay, or $230 full price and new. The shield tablet costs $300. What do you get for twice the money?

    From a tablet perspective:

    - Slightly larger, but lower quality screen
    - Stylus
    - Dramatically improved speakers
    - 28% heavier
    - Maybe slightly snappier? Much faster in benchmarks, but the Nexus 7 2013 is fine for browsing and tablet stuff. I haven't seen anyone compare them in interactive use.

    From a gaming perspective:
    - Shadowplay, if you have a nVidia GPU in your gaming box and want to plug a tablet into your TV. Better off getting a haswell chromebox and installing steam for linux on it.
    - Grid streaming, if you're in northern california.
    - A couple Tegrazone games, primarily 10 year old PC ports.
    - All the android games built for the lowest common denominator that play on your Aunt's Galaxy S2 will play here too.

    In my opinion, the Shield tablet doesn't make a lot of sense as a tablet or as a gaming device. If it was priced competitively with the new Nexus 7, then certainly it would be interesting. If you want to buy a small android tablet and don't care about the $70 (or $160 for the refurb!) I guess go crazy. But will they sell a lot of them? No way.

    Now if nVidia could get something like their GTX 860M and crunch it down to fit in a tablet TDP, and slotted it in alongside an atom CPU for a tablet running real Windows, with its massive software library, that could be truly attractive.
    Reply
  • ams23 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Shield tablet is already #5 in the Amazon.com best sellers list for tablets: http://www.amazon.com/Best-Sellers-Electronics-Com...

    Nexus 7 is a great tablet too, but the difference in SoC performance is quite large. Shield tablet has 2x higher CPU performance and 3x higher GPU performance in comparison, with a much more modern GPU too.

    Note that many of the people getting the Shield tablet are upgrading from the original Nexus 7 tablet, so the difference for these people will be like night and day.
    Reply
  • schizoide - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Yeah, it's beating the ipad air and mini. It just came out. You think that'll hold up? Reply
  • lmcd - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Well it's also the 2nd-most expensive tablet in the top 10, and most expensive in the top 5. Reply
  • Death666Angel - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    How many people go to amazon to buy Apple products though? I would hazard a guess and say they more often than not get their gear through Apple stores directly? Reply
  • melgross - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Apple's tablet sales have been slightly on the down slide, wait for the new model, mode for a couple of months now. We'll what happens when the new ones come out in September. Reply
  • Jumangi - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    The reality is the difference won't be "night and day" in the real world. The Nexus 7 is perfectly snappy using the 99.9% of apps that will actually be installed. Benchmarks are just that. So what if it gets 3 times the FPS on the T-Rex demo. There are real world practical reasons device makers have dumped Nvidia since the Tegra 3 for SoC vendors like Qualcomm. As powerful as the GPU is in this thing it will be a bit player in the worldwide SoC market. Reply
  • TheJian - Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - link

    T4 is used in: Nvidia Shield, Tegra Note 7, Microsoft Surface 2, HP SlateBook x2, ZTE N988S, Nuvola NP-1, Project Mojo, Asus Transformer Pad Infinity (2013 model), Toshiba AT10-LE-A (Excite Pro), Vizio 10" tablet, Wexler.Terra 7, Wexler.Terra 10, Acer TA272HUL AIO, HP Slate 21 AIO, Xiaomi Phone 3, Wacom Cintiq Companion Hybrid, Coolpad, Mad Catz MOJO, BungBungame's Kalos tablet.

    More I can't be bothered to list, you should get the point. That's MS, HP, Toshiba, Acer, ASUS, Vizio, PNY/MSI/EVGA make the note7 IIRC, etc. How many vendors does a compnay need before you say a chip isn't failing?

    K1 is coming in HTC Nexus 9, so google a bit player too? Nexus tablets sell very well. It was in everything google showed at Google IO this year (automotive, Tango, TV, Tablet). Seems to be a pretty decent bit player even before it really gets ramped. But whatever, I guess our definitions of bit player differ (greatly). You have to remember all revs before this were just buying time until desktop gpu met socs. Sort of like 7yrs it took to get cuda to dominate 90% of workstation graphics. With K1, many will know Nvidia's name is more than just PC gpus. Branding their own products was a brilliant move also, which will further this progress over time.

    I hope they put out a 20nm console box (size of xbox1/ps4) with 125w psu and running 4ghz or something with HD or SSD etc, 16GB etc and put android gaming on the map for REAL. A 20nm Denver with Maxwell gpu should do fairly well and easily run 3.5-4ghz with a fan/heatsink on it in a big xbox1 like box (or TWO of them just like xbox1/ps4, Denver already runs 2.5ghz in a tablet). With 3.7B in the bank NV needs to start making $2-10mil games now in preparation for a CONSOLE launch that runs a triboot of linux, steamos (surely porting to ARM) and Android L with 64bit. Now that's a console I'd really like to see and streaming my PC also to that tv for PC games. To keep it cheap keep a slot empty for me to install a bluray on my own or have two options one with one without. No need for a 4K new bluray player then either. They need to start developing their own games and buy up some small software teams to get this done. With even just 200mil NV could pump out a good 50 $4mil games for android that really take advantage of their hardware and an announcement like that would cause some sales and gain major attention. Port them to PC later for more cash with amped up graphics. If you still fail to get your money back allow them to run on other devices as a last resort a year or two later after you've milked all the sales you can for your own devices. They only need to break even to push hardware sales, but I'm thinking they'd make some money on quite a few if they make quality games by small teams (like the grimrock guys, 4 guys made Legends of grimrock, snatch up teams like them).

    NV is about to become a far larger player here just due to their desktop gpus migrating yearly to socs. You see the damage already in this review. The benchmarks will start to be well known as games start to be benchmarked for real and people wise up to who's running the best in GAMES. Qcom was great while modems dominated, we'll see how well they do in Nvidia's world now. NV will win the gpu war. Just ask Intel...LOL. Even AMD has a shot at making some cash if they'd get their butts in mobile gear (as in ARM, not x86 where Intel rules them). There is room in ARM land for both NV and AMD to rule many devices with gpus. Everyone already knows how to use their hardware inside out, Qcom has years to go here with ZERO experience in driver optimization for games etc. NV/AMD have been having a driver contest for 20yrs, and devs have been using their hardware for games for the same length of time. Good luck to everyone else here now that 50% of devs are making games for mobile devices (only PC tops that at 52%, consoles FAR behind these two).
    Reply
  • titan10 - Thursday, July 31, 2014 - link

    Just made an account to say that I loved your 'Just ask Intel...LOL',BTW great strategy... only if NV thinks same. Reply
  • savagemike - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    We have an original N7 in the house and a 2013 N7. I want a little bigger screen and am really digging the idea of a stylus. Don't have a game console or a gaming desktop either. Not a huge gamer, obviously. But would probably use this for the occasional game. Just another bonus that it can do a decent job of that.
    Being a big percent heavier or thicker than something very light and very thin isn't a big deal in reality. What this Shield really seems to have is unending flexibility.
    Reply
  • Knowname - Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - link

    you can buy a stylus for 2 bucks lol though xD just sayin' this would obviously be a BETTER stylus and drawing apps, but if all you want is a stylus you might find your answer without emptying your wallet. Reply
  • SpartyOn - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    A GTX 860m in a tablet? Surely this was a joke, right?

    The 860m pulls approximately 60w alone, maybe 50w if you paired it with DDR3 and downclocked it. In a tablet environment, you're looking at the entire SoC pulling 10w or less at load.

    Not happening anytime soon.

    That being said, if Nvidia could cram two Maxwell SMM units into the next Tegra vs. the one Kepler SMX in the K1, that would really be something.
    Reply
  • schizoide - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    I said crunch it down, obviously they wouldn't take the 60 watt card and plug it into a pci-e riser in a tablet. Compromises would be made, although less and less as time passes.

    My point was primarily that android gaming doesn't require high-end hardware, because the games target a low common denominator. An x86 windows based tablet makes a lot more sense for games.

    Then again, most windows games require a mouse and keyboard.

    Really, gaming tablets don't make sense as a separate market segment.
    Reply
  • fivefeet8 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Those arguments are the same ones made with the advent of gaming laptops and desktops. I can agree that the market for both is in the minority, but something needs to push the technology forward. At this point, the mobile space is ruled mostly by companies with technologies both hardware and software that have stagnated. Mostly because of the market conditions leaving pretty much only Qualcomm technology, but that has also caused them to become complacent to a large degree when it comes to software. Reply
  • schizoide - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Not really. Back in the day, games drove PC gaming hardware. You would go out and buy that new 3dfx card to play Quake 2. These days most PC games are console ports and low to mid-end hardware can play them just fine.

    Difference is that today there's an incredibly huge market full of mobile games with very modest hardware requirements, and very few are willing to release titles requiring top line hardware because the perception is those "core" gamers have consoles or gaming PCs.

    You're right that if nobody builds mobile devices with higher-end capabilities those games will _certainly_ never come. That's dead on. But at the same time, I'm not going to buy a gaming device without an exclusive game that I really want. And 10 year old PC ports like portal don't cut it.
    Reply
  • fivefeet8 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    That's the same argument you are making against the Shield Tablet. That it's hardware is not needed because most games run fine on lesser powered machines. Software has been playing catchup to PC hardware for years now, but we still have high end hardware to push the envelope.

    In any case, with the new Shield is a tablet that can do more than most on the market right now while still being able to push the technology forward. And you are correct, I wouldn't buy a gaming device either without a few games I really want, but then I'm not buying it simply for a gaming device only.
    Reply
  • savagemike - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    You might not buy a gaming device in that scenario. But this isn't just a gaming device it's also a tablet and as such can fill multiple uses.
    I'm not positive I'm going to buy one but I might. It's definitely on the list for consideration because it is so flexible. I wanted an 8"+ tablet and would very much like a stylus. Wasn't digging the extra price of the Samsung stylus models though.
    For $300 this thing seems like it does lots of stuff pretty well. I would be surprised if there are not bundles for $325 or so that include the tablet and controller come the holidays.
    We'll see. Want to see what the 64x version looks like too and also how pricing and quality play out for Android TV.
    Reply
  • ArthurG - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    comparing refurb price of a 6 months old item to a brand new model coming out today, very very fair... Reply
  • schizoide - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Sure. Why not? Money is money. You want to buy a small android tablet, Nexus 7 is at the top of your list, right? Reply
  • Friendly0Fire - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    A lot of people don't consider refurbs. I know I don't. Reply
  • schizoide - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Fair enough, then it's only a 25% price premium. Certainly much more attractive, then. Reply
  • abrowne1993 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    The biggest problems I have with my 2013 Nexus 7 are CPU and GPU performance. If I didn't already have that tablet, I'd buy this one in a heartbeat. Reply
  • TheJian - Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - link

    You must be kidding, comparing a refurb of an AGING product to a new product? $230 is the comparison, and for $70 extra you kick the crap out of nexus 7 2013. I didn't realize $300 was 2x $230. I guess I failed math.

    All the new games that come along with 20nm will likely have problems on that old thing, where K1 will keep on chugging (K1 will be the lowest common denominator next year at 20nm everywhere, and M1 or whatever they call maxwell version will be the new king). Not really interested in running all the games that are built for the lowest common denominator that will run on your aunt's galaxy s2. I'm interested in modern combat 5, asphalt 8, Ravensword, Dungeon Hunter 4 etc. All the stuff coming out this year and forward will get more potent. Though the old stuff is pretty nice too. The library keeps getting larger on android monthly.

    Will they sell a lot of them? Tell that to google, they'll be using K1 in HTC Nexus 9. I'm guessing 10mil+ sell in that unit alone and it will probably be $400-500 ;) $300 for a tablet that blows everything else in it's class away is cheap. Get off welfare, get a better job etc and $300 won't sound like much more than $230...ROFL.

    One of the other reviews did fine from North Dakota 1600 miles from California ;) Troll somewhere else please. Most of the ports have never sold more than 11mil (halflife2, Portal, Trine2 etc) so most people have never played the ports you're hating on. There are 1.2B android devices sold yearly now and growing. Next year with 20nm chips being at K1 level there will be 1.2B+ units top to bottom that can handle what K1 is doing and that will be what will create major game improvements. Everyone will be holding an Xbox360/ps3 in their hands that can act as a console output to tv. We're not talking angry birds any more even today. BTW, Trine2 came out 2011, Serious Sam3 BFE 2011, Portal 2008. We will start to see even more now especially after HTC Nexus9 hits. Not to mention companies like Gameloft, WB etc creating some top level stuff.
    Reply
  • Knowname - Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - link

    you make a good point, and one I actually considered when I looked for a new toy half a month ago. The Nexus7 (2013) would be just fine for my needs. THAN I saw this out of the corner of my eye and yes, I'll admit I WAS wooed somewhat by the false fantasy that is the 'latest and greatest'. The Nexus 7 is just fine and half the price! In the end though I succumbed to consumerism and though I like to think I'm very frugal I think I made a good deal.

    Bottom line, it's more than just a little snappier, it's THREE TIMES as snappy! The speakers are an upgrade, the connectivity is an upgrade, SD card compatible and best of all a great selfie camera!! xD ok I kid. Anyway forget the gamestreaming stuff (though... a definite plus if you leave your computer on 24x7) it's still very future proof I won't need to upgrade my tablet for at least a couple years with this!

    Unfortunately I bought a GT630 along with this hoping it'd do the trick for gamestreaming but... I don't think it will by what I hear... why just the energy hog GTX cards?? Like I'm gonna leave a GTX based computer on 24x7 just so I can use it more on a remote basis? *ahem* not likely... hopefully they come out with some extremely low power GTX cards in the future.
    Reply
  • fivefeet8 - Thursday, July 31, 2014 - link

    Gamestream works with the recent Maxwell GTX 750 Ti. Probably one of the best if not the best performance per watt card out now. Plus most video cards use much lower power during idle. Reply
  • Knowname - Thursday, July 31, 2014 - link

    but when your playing it it won't be idle. The GTX750ti may be my best bet, once I can get one for like 80 bucks I'll jump on it! Reply
  • phoenix_rizzen - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Small correction: First line of second paragraph:

    "NVIDIA is becoming the first tablet to launch a serious gaming tablet"

    Guessing that "first tablet to launch" should be "first OEM to launch" or maybe "first hardware manufacturer to launch".
    Reply
  • phoenix_rizzen - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Page 2, Console Mode paragraph:
    "Finally, there’s the aspect of GameStream and GRID, which make it possible for games to be played on the tablet that would otherwise wouldn’t work due to the compute requirements."

    There's one to many "would" in that line. Guessing it's supposed to be "that wouldn't otherwise work".
    Reply
  • Death666Angel - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Second paragraph:
    "today NVIDIA is becoming the first tablet to launch a serious gaming tablet running Android. "
    Probably supposed to mean "first manufacturer" or something along those lines. :D
    Reply
  • JoshHo - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Well, that's embarrassing. Typo corrected. Reply
  • SleepyItes - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Tegra K1 should support OpenGL ES 3.0, right? So, I wonder if it would be able to run the Dolphin (GameCube and Wii) emulator? The regular shield is awesome for running everything from NES to PSP (and even some NDS games), but being able to play GC/Wii games would be amazing. At the very least it would be cool if it could run NDS (e.g. DraStic) a little faster. Reply
  • lmcd - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    ES 3 is a subset of OpenGL 4. There's no "wondering" about it.

    As long as the CPU translation is efficient on ARM, it should be feasible.

    Read before you post.
    Reply
  • fivefeet8 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    It supports OpenGL ES 3.1 and above. Portal and HL2 are running in Full OpenGL 4x mode on it. I doubt Dolphin couldn't run the same as it already did with the TK1 Dev board. Reply
  • TheJian - Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - link

    Full 3.1 ES support and OpenGL 4.4. Being based on desktop gpus it should become a very good emu platform over time. I wonder if a 20nm M1 would be totally able to play wiiu games too? I find myself wanting to hold out for a 20nm version of NV's chip for a serious boost in power for gaming since android seems to be really taking off in this area. I couldn't justify a tablet before just as a tablet, but my list of android games I want to play is growing so might have to bite soon. Dad's nexus 10 isn't good enough for many things (dang res being too high). I hope NV sticks with 1080p/1200p for a while so gaming just gets better not slower on android. Above this is just stupid in something under 13in with gaming as an intention.

    Another review showed it running emus and Zelda Ocarina of time.
    http://gizmodo.com/nvidia-shield-tablet-review-a-g...
    Mupen64. Dolphin guys will probably adapt it to K1 soon I'd guess. The power and features are there. N64 games work at least according to gizmodo guy. I'm not really interested in anything before n64's time but there's some pretty fun stuff on n64 or better I wouldn't mind playing today (never owning any nintendo product previously).
    Reply
  • Knowname - Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - link

    the controller is certainly as uncomfortable as an n64's *bazinga* Reply
  • NZtechfreak - Monday, August 18, 2014 - link

    Dolphin will run, on time trial mode (no other racers onscreen) in Double Dash it gets 40-60fps, with high 40 to high 50s the majority of the time. Haven't yet tried a lot of other stuff. The Dolphin developers are really looking forward to the 64-bit K1. Reply
  • bossmoogle - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    I'm considering one of these but for me an important factor that wasn't discussed in the review was the glass on the display. I'm guessing it's not GorillaGlass. Is it scratch resistant at all? I'm on a Nexus 7 2013 right now and the GOrillaGlass is just amazing, if I wipe my screen off it still looks pristine as if it had just gotten off the assembly line. Not a single micro scratch is visible in the sunlight. Once you've used something like that it's very hard to go back to a screen you know is going to get all scratched up. Reply
  • schizoide - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    The nexus7 2013 actually uses Corning's "Fit" or "Concore" glass, which is not as scratch resistant as corning gorilla glass.

    I researched it briefly but was unable to find what the shield tablet uses. So I agree that it's probably not gorilla glass, or they would have said so.
    Reply
  • kron123456789 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Good thing about games on this tablet is that Tegra K1 optimized games are using desktop OpenGL, not mobile OpenGL ES. Reply
  • kidconcept - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    > Of course, the real question here is whether the gaming side is worth the price premium.

    Can you mention some other tablets the Shield has to compete with on price? For example, the Nexus 7 costs about $60 dollars more than the Shield (16GB +$70, 32GB-LTE +$50). Anything else in the same class as the Shield that is significantly cheaper?

    Great review BTW. Hit all the important points for most of the audience. As an artist, I'm curious about how the stylus performs, but I recognize that nobody else really cares about it.
    Reply
  • schizoide - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    You've got that backwards. The Nexus 7 16GB retails for $230 and the Nexus 7 32GB model with LTE at $350.

    The nvidia shield tablet 16GB retails for $300, and the 32GB model with LTE will sell for $400.
    Reply
  • schizoide - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Also like I posted earlier, if you're OK with manufacturer refurbs, you can pick up a N7 16GB refurb from an authorized reseller for $140 on eBay. Half the price. Reply
  • kidconcept - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Refurbs isn't really a great price comparison. Reply
  • TheJian - Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - link

    Refurb is not part of my vocabulary...LOL, especially of an out of date device with far less power. You're talking 3x the perf in 3dmark here. Even if nexus 7 2013 was retailing NEW for $140 this would be a gimme for me. You rarely get 3x the power for double the cash. Heck you rarely get 50% more power for double cash. We're talking 3x for 25% cash new here. That is ridiculously cheap power and it does things nexus 7 can't do. It's not just the power in this equation. Stylus, streaming PC, Grid, gamepad mapping software etc. You aren't going to draw with a stylus on nexus 7 etc. You won't be sticking in a 128GB SD card either. You're sacrificing so much at this point I'd say your options are only for the severely poor or people not interested in much gaming at all. Reply
  • akdj - Sunday, August 03, 2014 - link

    And a ¼ the speed, almost two years behind, and if ever there was a gaming 'tablet'... Nex7 ain't it. Sorry. I've got em both. Someone mentioned it earlier ...Android and Play Store are a waste land for games. Consoles. Computers. Even iOS for short term to lengthy MMO/RPG style games. Nexus 7 is definitely NOT an equivalent, and for what it is, it's also a joke as a reader (portrait) or browser. I've got both models and held out Hope but today, it is the iPad if we're discussing low end 'consumption' tabs with definitely the ability to get some work done with it, especially with the massive third party iOS catering club for keyboard or case, stylus or whatever game you're into, hobby you're interested in or magazine, book or newspaper ya wanna read the App Store has it Reply
  • akdj - Sunday, August 03, 2014 - link

    Sorry, I meant to add today's low end consumption and partial creation tablet is the iPad. I think Microsoft has an actuality niche with the SP3. So IMHO, it's iPad or Surface today. From the objective measurements Samsung seemingly has been working behind the scenes to correct the .nex mods and the 'S' series seem to do pretty well in some benches. Still. Play store is barren (I'm using both android and iOS-- FWIW, I love my Note 3 Reply
  • akdj - Sunday, August 03, 2014 - link

    Ugh. Edit Anand:-). Point was the SP3 is a full on computer with killer display and excellent Intel/iGPU power. So for creation on a tablet you've got another and signficantly more powerful core iX series proc or the K1. Obviously it's twice as much too. What about Gameboy/DS, Nintendo and their piss poor sales these days. I understand WHAT nVidia is doing but other than us geeks does anyone else? Reply
  • kidconcept - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Yes, I miss-typed. I meant $60 less. Reply
  • Knowname - Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - link

    I would like to know if the stylus' features can only be used in that one application. I don't know if there is an app that all you stylus junkies use but I doubt it's the one Nvidia always shows. Reply
  • akdj - Sunday, August 03, 2014 - link

    If it works, Sketchbook will drop weeks later. They're cross platform without a care in the world who's using S/B on which device. As long as their using it;) Reply
  • Voldenuit - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Thanks for the review.

    Anyone know if the controller is usable on PC (whether with hacked drivers or official support)? Might be nice to kill two birds with one stone (don't currently have a controller for my PC).
    Reply
  • NZtechfreak - Monday, August 18, 2014 - link

    Just got my Controller today, wasn't working in Dolphin (and the manual says PCs "are not supported at this time"). Hopefully that will come with firmware updates in the future. Reply
  • NZtechfreak - Monday, August 18, 2014 - link

    Dolphin on PC that is, realised that could be confusing since I was talking about Dolphin for Android earlier. Reply
  • Wolfpup - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Wish it had a larger screen. I'd really love a 12" screen for graphic novels and magazines, but I at least want 10".

    Regarding Half-Life...it's awesome it runs on this, but super lame it I guess REQUIRES Nvidia hardware to run? Android's already a big enough mess as it is. I don't need programs that only run on some and not all Android devices.
    Reply
  • Wolfpup - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    I wonder about the controller too...it seems very nice, but wondering if it'll work with PC games or iOS for that matter. Reply
  • vision33r - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Those of us that owned the 1st gen Shield love it because of the portability and form factor. I am able to use it on the train or plane easily like a NDS. This thing now requires that I put it on the dock or stand.

    I think they would be better off releasing a Shield with 5.7" display edge to edge instead of the big border.

    I can play most games like Skyrim on a 5" display well just annoyed by the border.
    Reply
  • chizow - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    If you listen to the MaxPC webcast with Tom Petersen, I think there is a very good chance we see an updated Shield Portable 2. Not sure about a bigger screen, I'd get one too if it had a 6" 1080p screen and TK1, but there's a good chance it has its SoC updated. I am 99% sure Nvidia said TK1 is pin compatible with T4, so it would be an easy upgrade. Reply
  • TheJian - Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - link

    Agreed, shield r2 is coming. They have said recently they serve different markets (and they do). There was no mention of it not being revved yearly and specs are out for 4GB, 1440x810 etc. That is no where near this device and seems likely a perfect update to Shield 1 and more geared towards handheld hardcore gamers. Shield was only 10mil to develop, so plopping in K1 shouldn't be much more if they stick with the same design etc, just amp a few things up (memory etc). No need for a massive redesign it was already good. Sticking with 720p or just above should save on power also, again more in line with a handheld usage playing games. MHL 3.0, usb 3.0 and support for a large SD card is all I'd need to jump I think.

    They said K1 32 and 64 Denver K1 is pin compatible, but not T4. But that's not a huge redesign considering the whole thing only cost 10mil the first time. They only needed to sell about 100K-150K to break even probably (assuming $100 or so profits for each sold based on ~160 vita cost, and 101 for 3ds BOM at launch for them). Everything from Vita/3ds got shrunk so costs are probably similar.
    Reply
  • GC2:CS - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    When nvidia had showed its prototype Kepler mobile GPU for the first time for examination here on anadtech I was excited as it showed it was drastically more efficient and faster than the king of mobile GPU's at that time the A6X. It just kind of blew it away, even though Apple really gone wild when talking about SoC's: a custom CPU architecture, a GiGantic GPU, huge amounts of bandwidth etc. But with such Kepler GPU they could afford to wait for a year and still beat everyone at least in theory.

    But in reality ? A year after Kepler prototype, we have well.... two tablets and an all in one ? And after a year even the power and performance story doesn't look as good as interpreted by nvidia.
    After a year we got the new Apple A7 that nVidia claimed about that their new K1 is 3x faster and 50 % more efficient.
    Lets compare them now.
    A7 gets 13 fps in manhattan and K1 over 30 fps, but still well short of 3x which is.13by3...wait...... about 39 fps. So about 2,4 times faster in comparison, still nice.
    Then there is efficiency. Running down a 19.75 battery in 2.2 hours with a display that consumes AT MOST 1,46 W at 200 nits yields an power consumption of all other components of AT LEAST 7,3W (most of that is the SoC+RAM) which is downright ridiculous. Then there is throttling. Maybe it doesn't look significant on that chart, but it reached vsync in first dozen runs. Taking into consideration off screen tests, without vsync it would run at about 63,5 at native resolution and it would start throttling sooner. Now going down to 46,1 thats a difference of 27%. Still nice for so many runs, but not all tablets have dedicated magnesium heat spreader installed in them and I don't think it will be problem for a gamer to play a PC game port for 70 minutes or more non-stop. But the bad thing is that it throttles even with that heat spreader, and that means its really hot.
    And now lets compare with A7. Its got far far lower power compustion under full load and also generates far less heat, so it the GPU doesn't throttle at all. Taking this into consideration, the tegra can be less than 2,4 x the A7, especially in tablets without custom heat spreaders and after prolonged use. And ouch a phone ! You can put the A7 into a phone ! And the GPU doesn't throttle at all as well. And then the A7 is 10 months old chip and still tegra has a hard time even in terms of efficiency. The A8 will be entirely different league, it will crush tegra, not it performance, but in efficiency.

    Considering all of this it just kind of dissapoints me.
    Reply
  • identity - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    iSheep trying to spread that Apple propaganda lol! Nice try though :) Reply
  • melgross - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    The fact that you feel the need to use that word just shows that your thinking is very limited. If you have something useful to say, try to refute what he said instead. Stop acting as though you're 12 years old. Reply
  • ams23 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Mobile Kepler in Tegra K1 is roughly 50% more power efficient than G6430 in A7 with GFXBench 3.0 Manhattan Offscreen test: http://images.anandtech.com/doci/7622/Screen%20Sho...

    Regarding throttling, there is virtually no throttling on Shield tablet until after 115 (!) runs: http://images.anandtech.com/doci/8296/TRexRunDownG... . You can see that Onscreen fps only varies by a couple fps during that time.

    As for battery life, Shield tablet has a battery saver mode which should result in superior battery life for gaming.

    At the end of the day, mobile Kepler can reach performance levels and playable settings that other thin fanless tablets currently on the market cannot even hope to reach. I would much rather have 3 hours of smooth and playable gameplay at 30-60fps than 5 hours of non-playable gameplay at 15-25fps.
    Reply
  • melgross - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    That's very true. But this is a new chip, and the A7 is now becoming an old chip, by the standards of mobile development. It will be interesting to see whether Apple can improve the A8 by the amounts they've been doing the past generations. Rumor has it that it will again be a 2 core design. If so, it could lead to some interesting strategies on the part of Apple.

    But, like anything else, we'll have to wait.
    Reply
  • ams23 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Oh and by the way, Shield tablet has a native resolution of 1920x1200. The 1080p offscreen tests in GFXBench are done at a resolution of 1920x1080. They are not the same thing! Shield tablet native resolution is higher than the 1080p offscreen resolution, and that is why fps is always a bit lower onscreen vs. offscreen. Reply
  • lucam - Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - link

    I almost agree with you. Nevertheless it's worth saying this is the first Nvidia SOC with so fast GPU. Having this sort of performance might have a drastic trade off on power consumption. I think if the A8 will have similar performance of K1 and better energy saving then yes. I doubt, by the way, the A8 will have better performance. In this round Nvidia has made better GPU performance. Question would be...isn't enough to sell enough tablets? Reply
  • UpSpin - Friday, August 01, 2014 - link

    Nice how you throw around you with meaningless numbers. Let's get your nonsense right:

    Performance:
    I use this benchmark comparison as base:
    http://gfxbench.com/compare.jsp?benchmark=gfx30&am...

    The iPad Air has a 30WHr battery, got released on November 1, 2013 and costs $500.
    The NVidia Shield tablet a 20WHr battery, got released now and costs $300.

    The iPad Air has in the GFX battery rundown a power consumption of 5.4WHr.
    The NVidia Shield tablet hasin the GFX battery rundown a power consumption of 9.38WHr.

    The iPad Air vs. the NVidia Shiled tablet has an average frame rate of
    Manhatten: 12.7 FPS vs 31 FPS -> 2.44x
    T-Rex: 26.2 FPS vs 65 FPS -> 2.48x
    Long Term: 21.3 FPS vs 56.3 FPS -> 2.65x

    Now let's put all the things together, considering the higher performance of the Tegra K1, together with the higher power consumption but also higher battery capacity of the iPad Air and we get:
    The Shield Tablet consumes 1.73 times the power of the iPad Air, but performs 2.65 times faster.
    If Apple clocks the A7 higher, so it consumes the same power the Tegra K1 does, the Tegra would be 1.53 times faster. Now add the fact that the Tegra K1 supports Full Open GL 4.4 and one should see, the GPU of Tegra K1 is a monstrosity. Not so the outdated A15 CPU, but for this they will release the 64bit version soon, which will fix this limiting factor.

    Efficiency:
    Web browsing: 10hr vs. 10.8hr -> iPad: 3Whr vs. Nvidia: 1.85Whr

    Conclusion:
    The Tegra K1 is faster and more efficient.
    Reply
  • Guspaz - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    The GPU is definitely fast, but how power efficient is it? If they've made a GPU that produces 2x the performance at 3x the power draw, then that's not going to be terribly competitive.

    Are there any tests that could validate this? Something like a GPU benchmark performed at a fixed framerate with the screen off?
    Reply
  • ams23 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    One would have to measure at the voltage rails (which is what NVIDIA did when comparing TK1 to S800 and A7). Reply
  • grahaman27 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Its definitely more efficient. Nvidia claims its 1.4x as efficient. Reply
  • melgross - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Over the years, Nvidia has made a lot of claims that have turned out to not be true. I'd like to see the measurements. Reply
  • FriendlyUser - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    The technology is cool and it really looks like a premium product, something relatively rare in the android space. However, I'm still looking for a use case. I mean, why would I stream from a PC instead of playing on the PC, if it is in the vicinity? And why would anyone pay serious money for gaming on the go instead of just using a smartphone for the few moments were mobile gaming might be interesting. And, if someone really needs to game on the go, 2.5h seems too few...

    Anyway, the technology is really nice and the execution is quite good. If I were in the market for a tablet I would think about it. Not tempted to upgrade, though.
    Reply
  • SpartyOn - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    I have a 1st gen Shield and it's for people like me: someone who sits at a desk all day and when he comes home doesn't want to sit at another desk or use a mouse anymore. I used to hook my mITX PC up to the HDTV and play with a controller, but then when I wanted to play an RTS or an MMO, I would move it back to my study. That's just cumbersome and requires a ton of wires in both locations.

    With the Shield, I can carry it around easily as a handheld and hook it up to my TV in Console Mode to get 1080p game streaming - all while now leaving my PC in the study for good. A couple other great use cases: playing PC games in bed while still being able to chill with my wife, outside enjoying fresh air, sitting on the toilet, and I've even sat on a lounger in the middle of my pool and streamed games.

    If playing PC games in the middle of a pool surrounded by sunshine doesn't sound boss, then I don't know what is.
    Reply
  • FriendlyUser - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Yeah, admittedly playing in a pool does sound cool. You do have a point there. My major obstacle would be paying for the pool, I guess... Reply
  • fivefeet8 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Maybe if Nvidia made a gamepad that was attachable to the Tablet and with good weight distribution. But then the Tablet is much larger though. Reply
  • tipoo - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    I'm very curious to see the K1 version with two Denver CPU cores instead of four Cortex A15s. Reply
  • MonkeyPaw - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    "There are still frame drops involved in scrolling through lists and similar areas where Android has traditionally struggled to stay smooth, but Android L should fix this issue for the most part."

    I chuckled when I read this. How many versions of Android have promised smooth UI frame rates? Since 4.1?

    MS could get Tegra3 to smooth-scroll Windows!
    Reply
  • CharonPDX - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Wow. When your "final words" section begins with "If I’m honest, it’s hard for me to review tablets... ... I’ve never really found a use for them." then I have to ask, why are you reviewing it?

    Shouldn't someone else at Anand be doing this review?
    Reply
  • DarkStryke - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    You hit it around here. Many of the non-Anand reviews the last while have been pretty average at best. Reply
  • bigstrudel - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Qualcomm has met its match here. That's what they get for leaning on Krait so long. Reply
  • fivefeet8 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Qualcomm makes good SOC's but unfortunately their drivers suck in comparison. Hopefully they've increased investment on that part with their new Adreno 420. Reply
  • kgh00007 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    It's a pity that the review wasn't done by somebody who actually likes tablets or uses one daily to give a more subjective opinion, based on the fact that they actually use a tablet.

    For me I use one every day, mainly for reading articles like this on the web, the nexus 7 2013 is a perfect device for that sort of useage.

    It's also a pity that the screen does not match up to the nexus 7 2013, I don't want to buy a tablet with a lesser screen regardless of specs!

    Thanks for the review though!
    Reply
  • name99 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    Why do you need a camera for "Twitch streaming"? Isn't the whole point of twitch streaming that you see what's happening on the TABLET?
    Is there something I'm missing here?
    Reply
  • fivefeet8 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    It does both at the same time. It records what's on the Tablet and has a Pic-n-Pic of the camera video. Reply
  • name99 - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    OK. I guess there are situations where that makes sense. Thx. Reply
  • 6cef - Tuesday, July 29, 2014 - link

    if "closer to 6504k is better", then you should order the graph by the absolute magnitude of the difference between each devices white point and that ideal value.

    duh.
    Reply
  • kyuu - Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - link

    +1 Reply
  • kae - Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - link

    I'll echo the question of a few previous comments... What is the compatibility of the controller with other Android Devices and PC's supporting WiFi Direct? I'm still rocking the Xbox360 Wireless, but if I can ditch the stupid USB dongle and go direct, I'd do it in a heartbeat. Double the function if it also communicates with my N5, and I'm sold.

    Anyone know? The documentation only talks about how fast WiFi direct is, but not if NVidia is using some proprietary drivers, or if it will work with any device. My hope is the latter.
    Reply
  • wintermute000 - Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - link

    it always beats me why the big two don't write decent cross platform drivers. Why on earth did Sony not write a good windows and/or android driver for dualshock for example. Easy money (how much can it possibly cost to write a joypad driver) to instantly create a new market. Reply
  • TheJian - Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - link

    proprietary, but nvidia is working with google to get it into AndroidL, so should start to work elsewhere soon, if not at least everything shield that comes along and K1 devices etc. A sale is a sale and you're not giving up a lot here, but mapping software (& community profile uploads for mapping to certain games) goes with it so maybe it would be giving away too much. Reply
  • victorson - Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - link

    "Although there are some compelling reasons to go with smaller color gamut." Could someone please help out and say what could those reasons be? I'm really curious, always thought there were no such reasons. Reply
  • UpSpin - Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - link

    Take a look at the color gamut of white LEDs. You'll see they're blue ones with a phosphor film to produce 'white' light:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light-emitting_diode#...
    However the color reproduction is lacking, especially on cheap white LEDs (the ones you can buy on eBay for example) The more accurate colors you want (high CRI) the more difficult it becomes, they become more expensive and also less efficient. To reproduce all visible colors the best method is to use three separate LEDs, a blue, green and red one. Such a setup is highly inefficient however.
    So all NVidia did was using cheap white LEDs to cut costs but also to enhance battery life at the cost of a poor CRI.
    Reply
  • theNiZer - Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - link

    Great review, very helpfull ! Reply
  • cashnmillions - Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - link

    Ok so the display isn't phenomenal. Like anyone can really tell the difference between a few pixels. It's an 8" tablet, it doesn't need resolution above 720p to look good. The GPU capabilities are phenomenal, I remember when the Snapdragon and Adreno destroyed the competition about a year ago, this destroys that. I think it's an awesome piece of hardware, I plan to get one, just kind of sucks that the controller is $60. I wonder if I can use an XBOX 360 controller with it like I can on my Nexus 7. Reply
  • kron123456789 - Thursday, July 31, 2014 - link

    Yes, you can use your Xbox360 controller with that tablet. Reply
  • LedHed - Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - link

    When is NVIDIA going to start putting competitive SSD's inside of their mobile devices? Reply
  • baii9 - Wednesday, July 30, 2014 - link

    Any comparison with a bay trail win8.1 tablet? Reply
  • nicolapeluchetti - Thursday, July 31, 2014 - link

    Am i the only one who doesn't see the point of a gaming tablet with only 2.5 hours of battery when playing games?The need of a tablet for gaming is more related to situations where you have to play for lots of time without charging. I know that you can dial down the graphics and save the battery, but then where are the difference from an iPAd Air (which also has many more games?). This is totally pointless for me, it could have been good if battery lasted 5-6 hours, like it is know it's pointless. Reply
  • hahmed330 - Thursday, July 31, 2014 - link

    If you run an ipad air full blast the batteries will last for 2.5 hours only... This is what they did.. If you run say dead trigger 2 or something like that the battery would last per say 4-5 hours.. That's pretty damn impressive by the way... I really hope this is successful as I would love play some really nice games.. Reply
  • semi177 - Friday, August 01, 2014 - link

    the comments on this site used to be good to read. now i just see bashing and misinformed comments. The admin should consider pushing down fanboy war threads much lower down and keep the useful ones on top. Reply
  • TheinsanegamerN - Monday, August 04, 2014 - link

    Anybody know where the 32GB tablet is, or when it will release? not even nvidia shows it as available on their website, nor even mentions it. Reply
  • scbundy - Thursday, August 07, 2014 - link

    So much for Charlie D's prediction that the Tegra K1 was going to be super hot, have a huge heatsink and use 50W. Reply
  • Azurael - Friday, August 08, 2014 - link

    It's a bit of a disappointment in the display department, much like the Tegra Note 7 (which uses exactly the same display as the original Nexus 7 with a marginally better calibration as far as I can see) The stylus is great (in fact, I prefer it to the Wacom-developed screen in the Galaxy Notes) as is the SoC performance and value proposition - but if they want to appeal to people other than gamers (I would certainly have bought this), they've got to work on that LCD. I skipped the Nexus 5 and bought a G2 despite objecting to its size because the N5 LCD was a massive step backward in contrast from that in the Nexus 4 when calibrated. I bought a 2013 Nexus 7 to replace my 2012 Nexus 7 a few weeks ago because the LCD in the otherwise great Tegra Note is not a step forward. When will device manufacturers other than Apple realise that people do care about the LCD? Reply
  • NZtechfreak - Monday, August 18, 2014 - link

    Got my Controller today, thought some people might like to know it works fine with other Android devices via USB OTG. Makes it that bit more worthwhile. Couldn't get it to work with my PC though. Hopefully Nvidia will make a small receiver dongle with micro USB OTG and full sized PC connectors. Reply
  • mrreload - Tuesday, August 26, 2014 - link

    "While I academically understand why people like tablets, I’ve never really found a use for them."
    Why in the world would AnandTech pick you for a tablet review? That's like reviewing a car but you don't own a car. Utter rubbish!
    Reply
  • SnakeAndShotie - Tuesday, September 23, 2014 - link

    I'm a pretty big fan of my NVidia shield - I know it doesn't have the best battery life ever but is totally manageable.

    If you want to see Portal on the tablet, check out this video: http://tinyurl.com/mxj7osm

    While there are some frame rate issues, it runs well for the most part!
    Reply

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