Google Updates Chrome To Version 36

by Brandon Chester on 7/16/2014 3:19 PM EST
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  • celestialgrave - Wednesday, July 16, 2014 - link

    More stability is always a good thing Reply
  • Flunk - Wednesday, July 16, 2014 - link

    Still no way to disable the annoying an unnecessary notifications feature I see. Chrome is a web browser, not an OS. There is no point duplicating OS functionality. Reply
  • cmdrdredd - Wednesday, July 16, 2014 - link

    If you're talking about the ones in the system tray you can turn them off and on at will. control panel > all control panel items > notification area icons. Reply
  • Exodite - Thursday, July 17, 2014 - link

    That only ends up replacing the notification icon with the overflow/hidden icon so no, it doesn't solve the issue.

    Luckily Chrome 27 works perfectly fine without the annoying notification bell, as well as giving me the option of having tightly spaced menus that don't boil my eyeballs with their stark white background.

    Win-win. :)
    Reply
  • DominionSeraph - Thursday, July 17, 2014 - link

    The system tray icon disappeared for me on update. Reply
  • Wintyr - Thursday, July 17, 2014 - link

    type this in the Url bar chrome://flags

    there some notification option in there you can disable to get ride of that dumb shit
    Reply
  • uditrana - Thursday, July 17, 2014 - link

    But Chrome IS an OS. It is called Chrome OS and google realizes that most of what some people do in on their computers is just a web browser and since they cant convince them to buy chromebooks they just slowly port Chrome OS into Windows. They have already done that to the "Metro" version of Chrome. Reply
  • maximumGPU - Wednesday, July 16, 2014 - link

    Does chrome now properly support high dpi displays? That was the reason I switched to ie on laptop a while ago. Reply
  • Treynolds416 - Wednesday, July 16, 2014 - link

    I'd like to know this too. I'm not going to stop using chrome because I find tab syncing very useful across devices, but on my new SP3 the blurriness causes me just enough anguish to consider using firefox in addition to it. Reply
  • crabperson - Wednesday, July 16, 2014 - link

    The Canary build of Chrome does, if you don't mind the reduced stability. I've been using it on my Yoga and it works pretty well. Reply
  • Alexvrb - Wednesday, July 16, 2014 - link

    LOL yeah let's "upgrade" to a less-stable version. Anyway, don't most other browsers support tab syncing these days? Reply
  • skiboysteve - Thursday, July 17, 2014 - link

    Every single browser does, including ie Reply
  • SirPerro - Thursday, July 17, 2014 - link

    Yeah because syncing tabs in IE is really useful for Android and iOS which are 99% of the mobile devices out there Reply
  • Alexvrb - Thursday, July 17, 2014 - link

    He was just answering my question. If you're on iOS you're probably using Safari. I don't think he was suggesting IE for Android. It works fine for WP8 devices though, which in some regions holds a decent share. My point was that Chrome isn't the only option in many cases - why not Firefox, for example? Reply
  • fluxtatic - Friday, July 18, 2014 - link

    Other than IE, are there browsers left that don't support tab syncing? Reply
  • madmilk - Wednesday, July 16, 2014 - link

    I wonder what's holding things up. Chrome on OS X and ChromeOS have had support for high DPI screens for over two years now. Reply
  • basroil - Wednesday, July 16, 2014 - link

    The reason is that Google is purposefully gimping chrome by using display interfaces that microsoft deprecated when Vista came out. They claim it's for XP compatibility, even though most XP users don't use chrome anyway and the number of affected clients would be lower than the number using HiDPI displays. Reply
  • skiboysteve - Thursday, July 17, 2014 - link

    I like Firefox because of the "awesome bar" that lets me just type to get anywhere in my history.

    However, considering I use an windows laptop... I couldn't run chrome even if I wanted to. The lack of high dpi support and the timer resolution bug draining 25% more battery are show stoppers. These issues have been around for years but Google has no incentive to fix them
    Reply
  • basroil - Thursday, July 17, 2014 - link

    "These issues have been around for years but Google has no incentive to fix them "

    They actually have an active disincentive because many reviewers test battery life using something other than IE11. For the Surface Pro 3 review, Engadget cheated the tablet out of huge battery savings by using Chrome, and given the similar battery life PCmag and others (maybe anandtech, but can't find anything on the specifications for their battery test), which makes it "fall short" of inferior android tablets.
    Reply
  • JarredWalton - Thursday, July 17, 2014 - link

    AnandTech uses the native OS browser, which means IE11 on Windows 8.1 these days -- I did some testing in an old article comparing battery life for our Internet tests between Chrome, IE, Firefox, Opera, and Safari; IE was clearly ahead at the time. Perhaps I should go back and revisit the subject at some point, but I'd be surprised if anything on Windows can beat IE for battery life. Which sort of sucks, because I pretty much never use IE these days unless I have to. Reply
  • SirPerro - Thursday, July 17, 2014 - link

    So you're saying that the number of XP computers is lower than the number of HiDPI windows displays.

    I serously struggle to find a Windows HiDPI display so let me doubt that.
    Reply
  • JarredWalton - Thursday, July 17, 2014 - link

    How many High DPI displays are used with XP, though? Um, probably none, unless you count old 30" desktop displays which are only moderately "high DPI". Reply
  • SirPerro - Thursday, July 17, 2014 - link

    Because there's really a big number of users there with HiDPI displays Reply
  • johnygl - Thursday, July 17, 2014 - link

    Yes Chrome supports HiDpi displays. How to enable it was mentioned on annandtech, here is link http://www.anandtech.com/show/7939/scaling-windows... Reply
  • Brett Howse - Thursday, July 17, 2014 - link

    In one of the builds after I wrote that article, Google broke support for High DPI and the workaround that partially worked before no longer worked.

    It's too bad it's still only fixed in a dev build of the product. Hopefully it actually is working this time.
    Reply
  • nefftd - Wednesday, July 16, 2014 - link

    Another good change that isn't listed here: when an extension changes the New Tab page, Chrome will now alert you of the change and ask if you would like to keep the changes, or revert to the default New Tab page.

    This is an excellent change to combat the increasing amount of adware that hijacks your browser's default search and New Tab page to point to their own ad-laden search page.

    I was delighted to open Chrome today and see that it had detected the Humble New Tab Page extension doing this, and alerted me. A very elegant solution to the adware problem, as it maintains the user's capability to customize.
    Reply
  • alyarb - Wednesday, July 16, 2014 - link

    How long til 37? 37 is the first one to finally render web fonts correctly. Reply
  • Alexvrb - Wednesday, July 16, 2014 - link

    I wonder if they'll skip version 666? I guess we'll have to wait a few months to find out. Reply
  • polygon_21 - Wednesday, July 16, 2014 - link

    Hope they fix the system clock tick rate issue soon...
    https://code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/detail?i...
    Reply
  • pixelstuff - Wednesday, July 16, 2014 - link

    Does anyone know the average time between the Chrome browser and matching ChromeOS versions are? Reply
  • tokyojerry - Thursday, July 17, 2014 - link

    How is it then, that I am using a version of Google Chrome that is v36.0.1985.125, if .122 was just announced today?

    QUOTE
    -----------
    Version 36.0.1985.125

    Google Chrome is up to date.
    -------------
    END QUOTE
    Reply
  • pixelstuff - Thursday, July 17, 2014 - link

    Might be the difference between Android and Windows browsers. According to matthewyuan@chromium.org in the comments they made a typo in the original post for the Stable Channel blog. Should have been 125 instead of 122.

    Stable Channel Updates (Windows)
    http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.com/2014/07/s...
    Reply
  • tokyojerry - Thursday, July 17, 2014 - link

    Should qualify the above statement. I am using OS-X version of Chrome (OS-X Mavericks (latest)). Perhaps that might be the reason for discrepancy in version numbers. Reply
  • purplestater - Thursday, July 17, 2014 - link

    But will they ever let me put my tabs on the bottom (between the shortcuts bar and the web page) where I want them? Reply
  • jerrylzy - Thursday, July 17, 2014 - link

    When will the 64bit version available for stable edition? Reply
  • tokyojerry - Thursday, July 17, 2014 - link

    As much as I like using Chrome, this is the superior point of using Safari on a Mac. Been 64-bit for quite a while. Reply
  • brendon919 - Wednesday, July 23, 2014 - link

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