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  • blanarahul - Tuesday, June 03, 2014 - link

    So, this doesn't have Turbo-Write, right? Reply
  • npaladin2000 - Tuesday, June 03, 2014 - link

    The write endurance on this is atrocious. non-enterprise MLC gets better than 600 TB on a 900+ GB drive! Reply
  • LtGoonRush - Tuesday, June 03, 2014 - link

    Pricing is definitely a problem, Intel's enterprise SSDs actually cheaper and as you noted deliver MUCH higher endurance. Using TLC NAND should result in pretty significant cost reductions but those don't seem to be apparent. Reply
  • ImSpartacus - Tuesday, June 03, 2014 - link

    We can only hope that prices will swiftly drop shortly after release. Reply
  • Krysto - Wednesday, June 04, 2014 - link

    I think Intel's SSDs have much poorer write performance, though? But yeah, forget performance. SATA 3 is more than enough for now. They should be trying to push prices to under $0.5/GB instead. Reply
  • hojnikb - Tuesday, June 03, 2014 - link

    Yeah but this is TLC, which translates to 3x reduction of write cycles.. Reply
  • hpglow - Tuesday, June 03, 2014 - link

    I don't think that its the case, but even if it were the reliability of tlc is exponentially worse than slc or mlc. I wouldn't be worried about a tlc drive in most cases the controller along with overprovisioning mitigates the risks. Reply
  • Solid State Brain - Wednesday, June 04, 2014 - link

    On Tom's Hardware the reviewer calculated that the normalized value of the wear leveling count SMART parameter reaches 1% at 3181 P/E cycles. Therefore, the rated 600 TB write endurance likely implies it's with random data, as assuming a write amplification of 1x (ie with 100% sequential data) 1024 GB of raw NAND capacity and 3181 P/E cycles the drive should be able to withstand 3+ PB of writes.

    Of course, it all depends on the workload.
    Reply
  • Krysto - Wednesday, June 04, 2014 - link

    Can TLC last 10 years with average use? Or is it more like 5 at best? Reply
  • Silenus - Wednesday, June 04, 2014 - link

    Well...what's "average" use? There is no such thing. For a server use case where the application is more write heavy than it'll be fine. For an extremely write heavy database....perhaps not. It all depends. Reply
  • Silenus - Wednesday, June 04, 2014 - link

    bah, meant for a READ heavy app it would be fine. Reply

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