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  • htotfalitm - Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - link

    "11.6” 1366x768 resistive multi-touch"
    "14.0” 1366x768 resistive touchscreen"

    dropped
    Reply
  • bountygiver - Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - link

    There are reasons to use resistive over capacitive. Considering the purpose of these laptops. Reply
  • MDX - Saturday, April 05, 2014 - link

    Yep, anyone who thinks capacitive touchscreens are good has never tried to use one in the rain or with gloves. Reply
  • StevoLincolnite - Thursday, April 10, 2014 - link

    Rain I could understand.

    Gloves? Not so much. At work when I am wearing thick leather gloves or I am on my dirt bike with leather gloves, my lumia 920's touch screen works fine. - And it's capacitive.
    Reply
  • Vepsa - Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - link

    While we think that is a low resolution, for their target market it is just about perfect. I work at a company that does E9-1-1 mapping software and we also have a mobile solution. The resolution isn't as important as the fact that the laptop can survive just about anything. Reply
  • teiglin - Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - link

    I still find it surprising that at those starting prices, they can't manage to get a panel with decent resolution in. I don't expect greatness, but anything less than 1600x900on a 14" screen is pretty awful. Reply
  • Khato - Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - link

    I'd guess that it's intentional though. For the situations these types of laptops are typically used in a higher resolution display would typically be run scaled to the equivalent of 720p or lower. Reply
  • Darkstone - Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - link

    In most cases i would agree with you, But i think high-res screens in this category are just not available. To give you an idea of what we're talking about: toshiba's rugged laptops feature an display with 1000cd/m brightness.

    Those are specifications that just aren't available in higher resolution displays.
    Reply
  • etamin - Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - link

    Common sense is that fast and accurate input in the field is a lot easier with a low res display. Clearly, this product isn't targeted at you.

    That said, the promo pic of the soldiers using the Dell is hilarious
    Reply
  • Ian Cutress - Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - link

    "Starting at 7.79 lbs. (3.54kg)"

    Still lighter than my M4400 with the sheet battery. :D
    Reply
  • piroroadkill - Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - link

    The last of the great 1920x1200 behemoths. Good laptop (I have one too). Reply
  • A Geologist - Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - link

    I see these doing very well in the resource industry indeed. When you're out in a rainforest/desert/tundra or 3 Km underground the last thing you care about on a laptop is a low resolution screen. Hell in most of those situations big pixels just make the mud covered screen easier to read and being able to bash the screen with thick gloves is just gravy. I've worked in a lot of pretty unpleasant environments and either of these is pretty damn close to perfect. Having said that the 12" with GPS is pretty much the sweet spot for me. Reply
  • bji - Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - link

    These laptops have a fan. Fans are moving parts, and moving parts break. I would be wary. Reply
  • nerd1 - Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - link

    So the new galaxy S5 with IP67 rating is actually more rugged than this beast?

    Interesting.
    Reply
  • BedfordTim - Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - link

    An IP rating does not relate to ruggedness. Drop an S5 and the screen will shatter. IP65 is enough unless you plan to use a high pressure hose on your laptop. Reply
  • JarredWalton - Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - link

    Correct. IP-65 is the dust and water resistance (basically it's sealed), but dropping and other impact tests are a different matter. I think MIL-STD-810G covers most of that stuff, but I can't say I'm fully up to speed on all ruggedness testing. :-) Reply
  • toyotabedzrock - Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - link

    What is the reason for having quickly removable storage? Reply
  • JarredWalton - Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - link

    Presumably if you need to grab the data and leave the large laptop behind? Reply
  • charles222a - Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - link

    Well, being as I'm in the military, I'll just tell you guys. :p

    We switch laptops between an unencrypted network and encrypted one fairly regularly; you swap the harddrives when you do that-there's different software on each that corresponds to each type of network, and what the network will allow you to do (no social media/IM/etc on the encrypted harddrive and network, obviously.)

    Destruction of the harddrive is a secondary consideration; if you're to the point where you're having to bail, you're not supposed to keep a sensitive harddrive with you for obvious reasons.
    Reply
  • CaterinaPSanchez - Wednesday, April 02, 2014 - link

    When you're out in a rainforest/desert/tundra or 3 Km underground the last thing you care about on a laptop is a low resolution screen. Hell in most of those situations big pixels just make the mud covered screen easier to read and being able to bash the screen with thick gloves is just gravy. http://u.to/bKbTBg Reply

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