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  • DuckieHo - Tuesday, January 08, 2013 - link

    Is NGFF significantly smaller than half-length mSATA? Enough to warrant yet another standard? Reply
  • CaptainDoug - Tuesday, January 08, 2013 - link

    I may be wrong but I think the point of NGFF is to get rid of msata. NGFF would fill msata's roll in small form factor storage quite nicely. I think I read an article about this like a month or 2 ago. I'll try to find it. Reply
  • CaptainDoug - Tuesday, January 08, 2013 - link

    There's actually a link to that article at the beginning of this one. Lots of information. Reply
  • Kristian Vättö - Tuesday, January 08, 2013 - link

    The purpose behind NGFF is not necessarily a smaller form factor (it's almost the same size as mSATA), but a form factor that can scale across multiple products. The disadvantage of mSATA is the fact that it only supports up to four NAND packages, which limits the performance and capacities (mSATA SSDs are slower than their 2.5" SATA counterparts and you're limited to 256GB with 8GB die).

    On top of that, NGFF will support PCIe as well, so it's more like an mSATA version of SATA Express.
    Reply
  • nathanddrews - Tuesday, January 08, 2013 - link

    "On top of that, NGFF will support PCIe as well, so it's more like an mSATA version of SATA Express."

    Rad.
    Reply
  • phy_lbc - Wednesday, January 09, 2013 - link

    Hi, where did you find out that mSATA only supports up to four NAND packages? Is that an inherent limitation of mSATA, or just current controllers? Also how come mSATA is slower than its 2.5" counterpart? I thought the review of the Crucial Micron C400 showed that they were neck and neck. Reply
  • DuckieHo - Tuesday, January 08, 2013 - link

    Ok, makes better sense... the NGFF standard is basically what mSATA should have been.

    Now.... why such the terrible name of "NGFF"!?

    Tech Support: "You need to replace your NGFF drive on your laptop."
    Layman: "A Nagghfffffffff drive?"
    Reply
  • Kristian Vättö - Tuesday, January 08, 2013 - link

    NGFF SSDs (like mSATA) will be mostly OEM only, so the naming doesn't really matter. Ultrabooks aren't designed with user-serviceability in mind, hence it's likely that most repairs/upgrades will be done by professionals.

    I wouldn't be surprised to see a more user friendly name, though. Things tend to have weird names during development phase, mainly because it's in the hand of engineers at that point (marketing people need to make it marketable, using a good name is one way).
    Reply

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