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  • Paulman - Friday, November 23, 2012 - link

    Now I'm excited to get a Nexus 4, possibly, instead of a Galaxy Note II. I'm a Canadian Rogers customer about 1 year into a 3 year contract with an LTE data plan. I'm currently stuck with a Galaxy S II (i9100) with no LTE support, but since the Galaxy Note II is about $700 outright, I think the much better deal would be to go with the Nexus 4, especially now that I know it has LTE capability (which some other Rogers customers have tried) :P

    I think the Galaxy Note II seems to have the leg up in terms of battery life, screen size (obviously), and nifty features like the pop-up view (Samsung only, I think?), but at effectively double the price, that's a pretty big difference.
    Reply
  • Fiercé - Friday, November 23, 2012 - link

    You're a Rogers Cellphone customer? You poor poor soul.

    How much would it cost you at this point to break your contract with them and take a Nexus 4 on a month-to-month plan? I'm honestly just curious as I try to stay away from them as much as possible, especially for Internet plans.

    Or were you hoping to just use the Nexus 4 on your current plan?
    Reply
  • LadyKate - Sunday, November 25, 2012 - link

    Love my job, since I've been bringing in $5600… I sit at home, music playing while I work in front of my new iMac that I got now that I'm making it online(Click on menu Home)
    http://goo.gl/lb8tZ
    Reply
  • Galcobar - Friday, November 23, 2012 - link

    For clarity for those who are interested but unfamiliar (like I was about a month ago):

    The AWS frequency spectrum band refers to microwave data (including voice) transmissions, which run around 1700 MHz for uploads and around 2100 for downloads.

    In Canada, the AWS band was the spectrum made available by the government in 2008 for auction.

    Newcomers to the Canadian telecommunications industry such as Mobilicity, Wind and Videotron licensed the AWS band for UMTS communication (3G and HSPA's fake 4G). The big three firms of Rogers, Bell and Telus licensed the AWS spectrum they bought for use with the LTE protocol.

    While they use the same frequencies, because the protocols are different a phone such as the Nexus 4 which is capable of LTE on AWS is not compatible with the networks which use UMTS on AWS.
    Reply
  • plumcakk - Friday, November 23, 2012 - link

    Except it is.

    Or else my N4 on Wind Mobile is running off thin air.

    You can't just base a phone's ability to use UMTS on its LTE antennae. The N4 has 1700/2100 on its standard 3G receiver as well.
    Reply
  • Galcobar - Saturday, November 24, 2012 - link

    You're correct, and mea culpa -- I worded that last sentence quite incompetently.

    Note to self, try to avoid writing in the middle of the night.

    I attempted, and clearly failed, to say that LTE isn't achievable on the Canadian networks using 1700/2100 for UMTS, even though the two protocols use the same frequenies in the Canadian market.
    Reply
  • bill4 - Monday, November 26, 2012 - link

    "fake hspa"

    Just like to point out HSPA isn't "fake": 4G by any definition.

    Original 4G stipulated speeds 100X faster than 4G. Obviously, LTE doesn't qualify.

    They then revised the spec to include both HSPA and LTE as 4G, even though NEITHER met the initial definition.

    So if HSPA isn't 4G, neither is LTE. People who call LTE the "real" 4G are just arbitrarily making things up.
    Reply
  • bill4 - Monday, November 26, 2012 - link

    Sorry, obviously I meant original 4G spec called for 100X faster than 3G...typo Reply
  • bill4 - Monday, November 26, 2012 - link

    Oh and additionally, in many cases and markes, "fake 4g" HSPA+ is faster than "real 4g" LTE. Further pointing out the absurdity. Reply
  • DAN13L - Monday, November 26, 2012 - link

    That is True, I have AT&T in the US and in some areas, my HSPA+ is faster than LTE but with a slower ping. Reply
  • djpavcy - Friday, November 23, 2012 - link

    Brian Klug, I have only one thing to say: Your detective work is second to none. Kudos to you sir! Reply
  • tcboy88 - Friday, November 23, 2012 - link

    why band 1 (2100mhz) is not supported?
    while band 4 (1700/2100mhz) is supported?

    Even though I do not understand what is the difference between 2100mhz and 1700/2100mhz
    But I am in Korea, LG U+ is on band 1, another 2 telco in band 5
    Reply
  • Paulman - Friday, November 23, 2012 - link

    From what I understand, Band 4 is divided into 1700 MHz and 2100 MHz because one frequency is used exclusively for the upload path and the other is for the download path. So that would be different from Band 1 (2100 MHz, in both directions), I assume? Reply
  • tcboy88 - Friday, November 23, 2012 - link

    okay...
    means I have no luck at all
    hopefully there are more magical things to happen
    Reply
  • zorxd - Friday, November 23, 2012 - link

    band 1 has upload at 1920-1980 MHz

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UMTS_frequency_bands
    Reply
  • Doh! - Friday, November 23, 2012 - link

    To be more technically accurate, in addition to band 1, LG U+ also is on band 5. SKT is also on band 3 & 5 while KT is on band 3, 8 & 26. In any event, LTE for Nexus 4 is a no go in Korea. It's a shame 'cause I will be getting a Nexus 4 soon and plan to use it in Korea. Reply
  • bakedpatato - Friday, November 23, 2012 - link

    And in addition, the Optimus G is LG's flagship in Korea and the G makes money for LG...the N4 is probably sold at cost or a little more than cost to el goog. Therefore, LG has a vested interest to make as few N4s as possible and to make and sell as many Optimus Gs as possible. Reply
  • aicom - Friday, November 23, 2012 - link

    Since this device is not tested for LTE by the FCC, is turning on LTE on the Nexus 4 in violation of the FCC approval? Reply
  • Alexvrb - Sunday, November 25, 2012 - link

    Why and how would they get FCC approval for something that doesn't currently exist in the US? There is currently NO LTE network on Band 4, in the US. T-Mobile *PLANS* to start deploying LTE on this band in 2013. But that means two things:

    1) You still have no LTE right now even if you're using T-Mobile with this phone.
    2) You have to use T-Mobile.

    So the only way I'd be interested in a Nexus 4 was if I just signed a two year contract with T-Mobile and was unhappy with whatever POS subsidised phone I got suckered into buying. Thankfully that will never happen. The only thing I like about T-Mobile is no overages for data.

    It still has a max of 16GB with no SD card. Google's Sergey Brin has gone on the record repeatedly saying that users are too stupid to manage their own PCs, and SD cards in tablets and phones would just confuse you dum-dums. Thanks Sergey! I'll be removing all secondary storage in my devices and relying only on your Cloud post-haste! Not.
    Reply
  • senecarr - Monday, November 26, 2012 - link

    Actually, MetroPCS uses AWS LTE in about 14 markets (perhaps more, as I think that is an old story I read it in).
    You would, however, be out of luck trying to take the Nexus 4 to them as their voice network is CDMA.
    Reply
  • Eug - Friday, November 23, 2012 - link

    As a Fido customer, I am tickled pink, since it should support LTE on the Nexus 4.

    However, it's currently moot, since I can't even order the Nexus 4. :(
    Reply
  • Zink - Friday, November 23, 2012 - link

    Here are some tests on my commute today with my Nexus 4 in LTE only mode. This is in Waterloo, Ontario on Koodo (Bell towers).
    http://www.imgur.com/MCWXo.png
    Reply
  • bplewis24 - Friday, November 23, 2012 - link

    So basically what this means is, the Nexus 4 in Canada is currently the best possible phone money can buy. And it's $300 off contract.

    I'm jelly.
    Reply
  • psygone - Friday, November 23, 2012 - link

    Good upload speeds and ping times. Did you need an LTE sim or have to change your APN to work on Koodo? Reply
  • Zink - Friday, November 23, 2012 - link

    The phone set up the APN automatically when I put in the SIM that came with my GSII. I deleted the proxy settings because they blocked speedtest but other than that I just clicked LTE only and this is what happened. Reply
  • Fiercé - Friday, November 23, 2012 - link

    Fantastic work Brian. Articles like this are why many come to AnandTech I'm sure.

    As an aside, can you quickly look into the Podcast naming schema, meta data and tag usage?

    Right now, the Podcast tag is missing from Episodes 5-7 (though a search for "podcast" brings up all of them), and the recent Episodes 9 and 10 are going under a weird "Anand Shimpi1's Album" on my phone. Episodes 1-8 went into "Anand Shimpi's Album" as a comparison.

    Also, a picture of the AnandTech logo wouldn't hurt either. In addition to aesthetic cleanliness with the rest of ones Album view, those sidelong glances at the screen from people sitting beside a smartphone user on a train or plane lead to curious Google searches and new listeners.

    Again, brilliant work. Be the wheat, not the chaff!
    Reply
  • Eudoxus - Friday, November 23, 2012 - link

    This is fantastic news. Even if the LTE eats the battery, I can always turn it off when I don't need it.

    Mr. Klug, you have made sitting on the backorder list for a Nexus 4 in Canada infinitely less painful. I didn't really believe this news until I saw it here.
    Reply
  • Mannberg - Friday, November 23, 2012 - link

    Does this mean if we could flash an AMSS (Advanced Mobile Subscriber Software) that has support for bands 4, 2, and 1 to the MDM9215M we would have LTE on band 4, 2 an 1? Reply
  • Mannberg - Friday, November 23, 2012 - link

    Is it possible to take the AMSS software from an LTE enabled Optimus G? Reply
  • descendency - Friday, November 23, 2012 - link

    I think the hardware is missing for bands 2 and 1. Reply
  • Zoomer - Friday, November 23, 2012 - link

    Not according to brian:

    the device included hardware necessary for LTE on at least some of its bands, namely bands 1 (2100 MHz), 2 (1900 MHz), and 4 (AWS 1700/2100)
    Reply
  • itsrishabh - Friday, November 23, 2012 - link

    Hmm interesting. I might get it and switch over to Telus from Mobilicity.. Reply
  • Zoomer - Friday, November 23, 2012 - link

    Brian, would you mind searching for the microSD pads and perhaps connecting one up to see if it works? Since this is so similar to the Optimus G, there is some hope that it is just unimplemented? Reply
  • Muyoso - Friday, November 23, 2012 - link

    Man that would be a hell of a project. Reply
  • nexusfan - Saturday, November 24, 2012 - link

    So if I understand this correctly, the transceiver and PA's are there for bands 1, 2 and 4 but the software only supports band 4.

    "I tore down the Nexus 4 to ascertain whether PAs were present that could work with LTE, and saw indeed that at least bands 4, 2, and 1 did have Avago power amplifiers (A5704, A5702, and ACPM–7251) which noted support for LTE."

    Does this mean that bands 1 and 2 are only a software patch away from being functional??
    Reply
  • A5 - Tuesday, November 27, 2012 - link

    Theoretically it could be done with a baseband update, but don't count on it. Reply
  • jmunjr - Saturday, November 24, 2012 - link

    I was so pumped about this phone but I don't care what the reasoning by Google I need a micro-SD slot and a removable battery in my phone. I constantly swap batteries in my current phone because of how much I use it without access to charging. I need the micro-SD to hold gobs of data when traveling. If they had a 32GB option I'd be more open, but the battery issue is a deal killer. Reply
  • Home mortgages - Sunday, November 25, 2012 - link

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    Whether you choose to renew your mortgage early or wait until your mortgage maturity date, this article will help you understand the renewal process........Thanks
    Reply
  • Spuke - Sunday, November 25, 2012 - link

    Sorry but not having complete LTE support in a brand new phone is just F'n retarded. Reply
  • shabby - Sunday, November 25, 2012 - link

    Show me a $300-350 lte phone with a s4 pro soc. Reply
  • doobydoo - Tuesday, November 27, 2012 - link

    Show me a phone for any price which gets instant operating system updates with an S4 pro SoC (or equivalently fast processor) and has LTE?

    For someone who wants that on Android, there is no option available.

    Not everyone wants a bargain like a Skoda. Some want quality like a Bentley.
    Reply
  • gullfaraz - Tuesday, November 27, 2012 - link

    Since this device is not tested for LTE by the FCC, is turning on LTE on the Nexus 4 in violation of the FCC approval? Reply
  • A5 - Tuesday, November 27, 2012 - link

    Yes. They'll have to either amend their FCC filing or push a baseband update to disable it.

    If I had to guess, I'd say they'll push it through the FCC next year before Google I/O to conveniently line it up with T-Mo's LTE launch.
    Reply
  • giggidy - Tuesday, November 27, 2012 - link

    Anyone know when Tmobile USA will release LTE (1700/2100mhz)? Reply
  • corleyman - Sunday, December 09, 2012 - link

    This is exciting news for me because even though I'm overjoyed with my current HSPA data connection of 10Mbps+, I see that Tmo continues to roll out HSPA+ (42Mbps) and plan to have LTE by mid-2013 ... so this phone will definitely span all those updates on the network. :) And at only $49/mo for unlimited everything, I don't know why anyone would want anything else! Check out what I have right now: http://www.PenniesOverDollars.com Reply
  • EmilyGreen - Monday, December 24, 2012 - link

    If wonder if there’s a way to determine which of the carriers provide the most timely and consistent updates? AT&T seems to do a lot of updates, which keeps them relevant while building its 4GLTE network. I've got it here in New York and it helps my graphics design work tremendously when it comes to sending large files. Reply

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