POST A COMMENT

25 Comments

Back to Article

  • Soulkeeper - Thursday, May 24, 2012 - link

    I like gigabyte, nice review.

    However, those temperatures for the IB overclock remind me of prescott for some reason.
    Reply
  • Night201 - Thursday, May 24, 2012 - link

    Works great. Running it with an Ivy Bridge i5-3450 with 8GB RAM and an older 8800gt GPU. Reply
  • Iketh - Thursday, May 24, 2012 - link

    Aren't those asrock computation results interesting. The board requires the least volts for your stress tests, yet it appears this is because the board isn't allowing the CPU to stretch its legs. Reply
  • zero2dash - Thursday, May 24, 2012 - link

    Looks like an even better board than the GB, and it looks like there might be more clearance for the front panel headers even with a 2nd GPU installed. Reply
  • tuxRoller - Thursday, May 24, 2012 - link

    Can you confirm that F10 supports ecc ram?

    Thanks/liam
    Reply
  • milkod2001 - Thursday, May 24, 2012 - link

    are u guys planning to review: Gigabyte Z77X-UD5H?

    Would love to see how much better it's compared to mobo u've just reviewed and how it stands against ASUS and MSI offerings
    xeers
    Reply
  • IanCutress - Thursday, July 12, 2012 - link

    We have one in, plan to review it at some point amongst all the others :)

    Ian
    Reply
  • Patflute - Thursday, May 24, 2012 - link

    Interesting right? Reply
  • Patflute - Thursday, May 24, 2012 - link

    Oh its not the exact same Reply
  • ctbaars - Thursday, May 24, 2012 - link

    1 x 8-pin 12V connector (In spec table) or 1 x 4-pin 12V connector (In photo)
    and does it really matter / have any effect on power delivery for CPU or SLI/Xfire anyway?
    Reply
  • Denithor - Thursday, May 24, 2012 - link

    First page, below the first picture:

    Due to the size of the board, we only the SATA ports from the chipset specification - this means two SATA 6 Gbps (white) and three SATA 3 Gbps (blue).


    This sentence makes no sense at all. You're missing a word or two or something.

    Fourth page:

    During video, the board is somewhat thwarted with it's bigger brother needing less power.


    http://www.its-not-its.info/

    And there's something else wrong with how that sentence reads, just not smooth at all.
    Reply
  • Kharadmon - Friday, May 25, 2012 - link

    Due to the size of the board, we only the SATA ports from the chipset specification - this means two SATA 6 Gbps (white) and three SATA 3 Gbps (blue).


    This sentence makes no sense at all. You're missing a word or two or something.


    It also appears to be missing a SATA-II port.
    Reply
  • FozzyofAus - Thursday, May 24, 2012 - link

    I realize it's in a different price category but any chance of a review of the Asrock uATX board? Reply
  • repoman27 - Thursday, May 24, 2012 - link

    "The F10 BIOS supposedly updates the board to accept Xeon E5-12xx processors"

    I think the LGA 1155 Xeons are actually E3's, not E5's.
    Reply
  • spikebike - Thursday, May 24, 2012 - link


    I checked the Gigabyte site and no mention of the Xeon E3.

    Can anyone confirm that if I buy one of these from Amazon and/or Newegg that I'll get a BIOS that will work with a Xeon E3-1230v2 or similar IVY bridge Xeon?

    I don't want to end up with a motherboard that is unbootable until I find another older lga1155 CPU to get it going.
    Reply
  • spikebike - Thursday, May 24, 2012 - link


    Note the CPU compatibility list does list numerous E3 Xeons, but all of the Sandy Bridge variety. No Ivy Bridge Xeons (version 2) are listed.
    Reply
  • tuxRoller - Friday, May 25, 2012 - link

    Are those even available yet? Reply
  • spikebike - Friday, May 25, 2012 - link

    Ya, newegg, amazon, provantage, ark.intel.com, etc. Reply
  • jtd871 - Friday, May 25, 2012 - link

    Anandtech / Ian:

    Thanks for the great reviews of Z77 boards. Looking forward to seeing more of them.

    +1 for including non-full-ATX form factors, as some tech sites don't even plan on covering them. I hope that there are some more uATX and mITX Z77 board reviews scheduled.
    Reply
  • Lazlo Panaflex - Friday, May 25, 2012 - link

    "I perhaps cannot see what the real voltage being applied to the CPU is unless I break out a DVM. It is also slightly devious to users who use the voltage value as a marker in reducing power usage. I hope that this will be changed in a future BIOS, but whether this change was malicious or not, it does raise questions as to what else Gigabyte may be changing from real values on the board to reported values."

    This is troubling. Ian - have you experienced this phenomenon on Gigabyte Z68 boards?
    Reply
  • SixOfSeven - Friday, May 25, 2012 - link

    Great review, great board. However:

    Case Open Test Bed - CoolerMaster Lab V1.0

    There are a few microATX chassis worth considering but it's still pretty slim pickings out there.
    Reply
  • kenyee - Friday, May 25, 2012 - link

    Probably something that would be worth mentioning, but they've figured out how to set up the DSDT tables in the UEFI BIOS better than other motherboard makers if you're trying to set up a Hackintosh... Reply
  • MadAd - Sunday, May 27, 2012 - link

    Thanks for the review of a more 'normal' board instead of these 4x16 pcie monsters - not all of us have multiple graphics cards (mines full of disks) and simply dont need more than a uATX but do still want good overclocking, sata 6 and the best bolt ons Reply
  • StefanM - Sunday, May 27, 2012 - link

    Excellent review,

    I have this board paired to a i5-3570K under a thermalright venomous X and 16GBs of corsair XMS3 DDR3-1600 RAM.

    I'm @ 4.4GHz, LLC extreme, 44x, stock voltage (1.2v) and DDR3-1600... the board refuses to complete POST if I raise the BCLK over 101 and the multiplier above 44x despite voltage increases to the ram/cpu - I'm also using the F11 Bios.
    Reply
  • najames - Monday, June 04, 2012 - link

    Does this board have the ability to enable VT-d for vurtualization? It would also be nice to have a normal sized PSU and test power on an on-CPU Intel graphics system. Reply

Log in

Don't have an account? Sign up now