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  • Taft12 - Monday, April 16, 2012 - link

    To me this is where they blew it most with Vista (and didn't fix it enough with 7) Simplify your offerings!!! Reply
  • RamarC - Monday, April 16, 2012 - link

    they did simplify!
    "Windows 8 Pro, which is analogous to Windows 7 Ultimate...
    This is as simple as the WIndows product stack has been since Windows XP"
    now there's just a biz edition and a consumer edition. no crippled 'standard' edition and Pro includes everything for $20 more. and most consumers don't need the biz edition features ("Bitlocker, EFS, the ability to boot from VHDs and host Remote Desktop sessions, the ability to join Active Directory domains")
    Reply
  • Zink - Monday, April 16, 2012 - link

    sigh Reply
  • AnotherGuy - Monday, April 16, 2012 - link

    lol Reply
  • coder543 - Tuesday, April 17, 2012 - link

    Simplify and don't list the same feature over and over...

    My Question: Why does Microsoft mention encryption THREE TIMES in the feature list? I don't understand. It's like a product that has no features... you keep reiterating the same one feature over and over to make it feel more featured.

    (note: I rearranged the list so they would fit in one screenshot, but they really are there.)
    http://i.imgur.com/jFql0.png
    Reply
  • damianrobertjones - Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - link

    How did they 'blow it' with anything? I'd prefer CHOICE than limited options.

    At times I find that people will find ANYTHING to complain about.
    Reply
  • Taft12 - Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - link

    You prefer it, and most of the time I do too, but consumers don't want many choices in a product line. Business school textbook stuff. Reply
  • mcnabney - Monday, April 16, 2012 - link

    Windows Mediacenter now is a paid extra and is only available with PRO!

    Looks like Win7 isn't getting upgraded and I might never have another Microsoft desktop.
    Reply
  • A5 - Monday, April 16, 2012 - link

    Well, the only reason to use WMC over the various Linux options now is if you need to watch/record DRM'd cable shows (and even then MythTV will let you watch, but not record).

    Sadly, they're the only game in town for a good cablecard-based DVR system, though.
    Reply
  • mcnabney - Monday, April 16, 2012 - link

    That is what I assume will happen. A nice media-focused distro of Linux that will run on some low-power hardware and provide recording and streaming functionality. My WHS (v1) box will replaced with a NAS and my gaming HTPCs will be replaced by a PS4 and a dockable high performance tablet. My Win7 HTPC will probably stick around for a long time - serving only to play my existing games+Steam. A post-PC world need not have anything to do with Apple. Reply
  • damianrobertjones - Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - link

    A-ha! Neither Apple or MS home....

    The way of Google... good luck with your data or messing with Linux
    Reply
  • CU - Tuesday, April 17, 2012 - link

    I don't think MythTV will let you even watch DRM'd cable shows unless it is marked copy freely, because MythTV is always recording. Reply
  • RamarC - Monday, April 16, 2012 - link

    sorry, but with so many streaming video apps/services available, MCE just isn't worth the dev effort. i'm sure there'll be plugins to sage and other DVR apps that will fill the void at a low/free cost. Reply
  • mcnabney - Monday, April 16, 2012 - link

    Microsoft is clueless.

    They just got finished ripping Drive Extender out of WHS Vail and effectively murdering the platform.

    Now they are adding Drive Extender to Win8.

    Mediacenter is an application that is used by a small percentage of user (don't use their numbers, MS counts every dam business install - of COURSE office computers don't use mediacenter), but is demanded by those that do use it. At first they just won't upgrade, but I am sure that Google will find a way to grab those enthusiasts.

    That is why I said that MS is done. I didn't have a problem using (and paying) for MS products when they literally were a Jack of All Trades. Now they are hobbling themselves to become appliances. Guess what - if I have a choice in the market - MS wouldn't be winning my money if others could easily replace it.
    Reply
  • B3an - Monday, April 16, 2012 - link

    Microsoft know exactly what they're doing. No one uses Media Center. I remember MS posted about MC in their blog and it was something less than 1% of people who actually use it on Win 7. It makes perfect sense for MS not to include MC by default!
    Drive Extender (Storage Spaces) features make perfect sense on the other hand. Data integrity, easy mirroring and speed will benefit far more users than media software no one uses. I can see manufactures even shippings PC's with Storage Spaces enabled by default.
    Reply
  • mcnabney - Tuesday, April 17, 2012 - link

    You didn't even read my post. I know it is a minority, but 1% of users is still many millions of active readers.

    And there are plenty of parts of Windows that are used by an extremely small of the installed base. For example - Event Viewer. I would be surprised if 1% of users actually use this application, but Windows would be highly deficient without it.
    Reply
  • damianrobertjones - Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - link

    maybe just spend the extra £30/£40 for something you supposedly use day in, day out. What is the issue? You probably spend more on a couple of meals.

    ANYTHING to complain about...
    Reply
  • crispbp04 - Monday, April 16, 2012 - link

    MS is done? With what exactly? Hobbling themselves? You don't understand how enterprise business works. Maybe some day. Reply
  • mcnabney - Tuesday, April 17, 2012 - link

    I am actually pretty familiar with that. My business (which employs about 100k people, mostly in the US) is drastically reducing the numbers of laptop/desktops and replacing them with iPads(!!!) and custom Linux-based terminals in sales & support. Windows/Office licensing has gotten expensive enough that the usefulness has been questioned. I am quite frankly surprised with the iPads, but they have been working really well. Reply
  • damianrobertjones - Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - link

    Name of company please? Reply
  • damianrobertjones - Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - link

    Really? Clueless? Drive extender simply didn't work and ended up with corrupted data for a select few.

    P.s. Running WHS 2011 myself and am glad that DE's gone.
    Reply
  • Taft12 - Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - link

    WHS is a poorly selling product anyway, I wouldn't be surprised if WHS 2011 is the last version they'll release. Reply
  • andrebrait - Monday, April 16, 2012 - link

    I never liked the MS MediaCenter...

    I think XBMC if far better than WMC...
    Reply
  • dagamer34 - Monday, April 16, 2012 - link

    The ONLY reason to use Windows Media Center is as a CableCard DVR. Everything else has pretty much been put into the Metro environment in Windows 8. And the real problem is that CableCards are such a US-centric solution that it never made sense for Microsoft to invest significant energy into it anyway, when IPTV is a far more global solution in the long term for the rest of the world. All you need is a working internet connection and perhaps a login from your provider. No truck rolls, no need to deal with crappy boxes, no rental fees, period. Reply
  • jabber - Tuesday, April 17, 2012 - link

    I must admit I've never used Media Centre on any of my PCs or laptops. My Xbox does the job from my NAS box and as others have said there are just simpler better options out there. At least MS realises this.

    I've only seen one of my buddies use it and he is a MVP!

    The world has moved on.
    Reply
  • damianrobertjones - Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - link

    Really? You're never going to buy another MS product again? So would that mean you'll be moving to Apple?

    Cost of Windows 8 pro vs a new laptop?

    Hmmm
    Reply
  • Golgatha - Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - link

    WMC is now an XBox 360. Outside of the general geek population, hardly anyone attaches a full fledged PC to their TV. A lot of people can share their folders through WMP and pull it up on their XBox 360 though. Reply
  • Matt08642 - Monday, April 16, 2012 - link

    You seriously need Windows 8 PRO to join a domain?

    Are you kidding me?
    Reply
  • TheMouse - Monday, April 16, 2012 - link

    Did you think they would change that for Windows 8? It's been like that since XP. Reply
  • jrocks84 - Monday, April 16, 2012 - link

    You need Windows 7 Professional to join a domain currently. Reply
  • AnotherGuy - Monday, April 16, 2012 - link

    Why wouldnt you... ? Reply
  • tipoo - Tuesday, April 17, 2012 - link

    ...Which is the exact same as its been for over a decade. Why would we expect that to be different? I do wish they rolled Pro and standard into one though. Reply
  • euler007 - Tuesday, April 17, 2012 - link

    XP Pro, Vista Business or above, Win 7 pro or above. Always been like that.

    Guess you don't administer a domain.
    Reply
  • B3an - Monday, April 16, 2012 - link

    I like how MS are keeping things simple with Win 8. Just 2 editions for home users, and now many MS services and features are being integrated - its about time! I particularly like the SkyDrive and Storage Spaces features. Also love the improved performance and lower RAM usage over Win 7, especially on old hardware. Will definitely be upgrading. Reply
  • jabber - Tuesday, April 17, 2012 - link

    While I'm not too keen on the UI changes I do like the performance tweaks as you say.

    If MS do the near half price discount for pre-orders like they did with 7 I shall be getting in half a dozen copies.
    Reply
  • snoozemode - Tuesday, April 17, 2012 - link

    Is that they get rid or redo the damn metro because I am still struggling with Win 8 CP.

    To go to control panel I have to put my mouse up in the right corner and wait.. but no my mouse pointer so happens to go into the next screen 70% of the times, no one at microsoft uses dual monitor setup?

    To shut the computer down I now first have to sign out then shut it off. Reason is?

    And why do I have to pull up a screen lock like on a mobile phone to be able to login, do they think I carry my computer monitor in my pocket?

    And for the love of.. Why the h*ll do I end up in a damn full screen app when I just want to have a quick look at a JPG? A PDF?

    Come on Microsoft. Anand said it all right, you are doing exactly what you've done before (Windows mobile, Windows 7 on touchscreens), just in reverse! Keep metro for touch-devices but give me back full desktop mode for my main computer. Thank you.
    Reply
  • danielkza - Tuesday, April 17, 2012 - link

    a) Win -> type 'Control Panel' or a subset of it. Or pin a shortcut to the Start Screen or your desktop...

    b) That's not true at all, you can shutdown through both the Power button in Settings sidebar and through the Alt-F4 menu.

    c) That's clearly targeted at tablets, but you dont have to drag anything, any click or keypress will have the same effect.

    d) You can change the association for JPG files back to Windows Photo Viewer, there's even a popup asking if you want to change the default program when you first open a file of an specific time.

    e) Saying there is no 'full desktop' in Windows 8 is at best misleading, the only thing that was replaced was the Start Menu which is not anything close to a majority of a 'desktop experience'.
    Reply
  • B3an - Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - link

    Exactly.

    I'd also like to point out you can just right click where the Start button used to be and you'll now get a new menu showing shortcuts, which includes the Control Panel!

    It's the same with 99% of Metro / Win 8 hating idiots. I think most of them are actually mentally retarded. As you just pointed out all these things can be quickly changed or just done another way. Takes like 20 mins to customize Win 8 and read up on key shortcuts or how to now access things, and thats it, you wont ever have to do it again! Most of Win 8's user settings and customizations are also now synced with SkyDrive, so even if you do a clean install you wont have to setup any of this stuff again.
    Reply
  • snoozemode - Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - link

    An OS should be intuitive. All this right clicking, putting mouse pointer in corners, keyboard shortcuts and switching between fullscreen metro apps that can't be closed like normal apps is off-putting and confusing, even to me that started with DOS at 4 years of age. Imagine how it would feel for a kid that have been doing 80% of his/her computing through an iPhone.

    Syncing with the live-account is great.
    Reply
  • snoozemode - Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - link

    A. Yes I've done that, but really, is it a good solution that I have to pin everything I previously had easy access to via the start menu?

    B. Alt-F4 is not good at all because I always put the computer to sleep and Alt-F4 closes the current program. The settings sidebar is a mess as I've said because I can't just pull my mouse up in the right corner (and wait....) because of dual monitors (really try this before saying anything).

    C. Sure, but still, why on a computer?

    D. Yes but it's a pain in the ass and something that shouldn't be needed. Why not a general option of "open files in Metro or desktop?"

    E. For me it's a compromised desktop mode, for many people without good computer knowledge the changes will just result in a lot of frustration.
    Reply
  • damianrobertjones - Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - link

    ??????????????

    While on the main Metro screen simply type Contro.... and the search will bring it forward for you to click.

    ?

    Set your power button to shutdown the machine.

    You're using a CONSUMER PREVIEW... a PREVIEW! The clue is in the word, 'Preview'.
    Reply
  • James5mith - Tuesday, April 17, 2012 - link

    What possible reason could they have to offer 32-bit only versions of Windows 8? There are no systems that a sane IT person, or even end-consumer would consider upgrading to Windows8 that have 32-bit only CPU's. 32-bit CPU's went the way of the dodo at the same time as systems that were limited to 1-2GB of RAM, max.

    Seriously, what is microsoft thinking? I ask because I cannot see a logical reason to keep 32-bit only OS branches alive.
    Reply
  • haukionkannel - Tuesday, April 17, 2012 - link

    Newer heard Intel Atom prosessors? They are still 32bit and are still manufactured... Reply
  • damianrobertjones - Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - link

    Business.

    That is all.
    Reply
  • fishbits - Tuesday, April 17, 2012 - link

    Did I miss their saying the max RAM supported on the RT version? Was 16 GB on Home for Win7, hoping for 64 (or at least 32) this time out. Will help me decide what Win7 licenses to snatch up before 8 comes out. Reply
  • fishbits - Tuesday, April 17, 2012 - link

    Ugh, not RT (that name!) Plain Win 8, the Win 7 Home equivalent. Whoops! Reply
  • B3an - Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - link

    The Consumer Preview recognises all of my 32GB, and the CP is basically the Pro version.

    And i've seen Win 8 running on a system with 1TB or RAM, yeah 1TB! Which i assume is also the Pro version. No idea about the limits of the non-pro version of 8, dont think it's been announced yet.
    Reply
  • cyabud - Tuesday, April 17, 2012 - link

    I was caught out when I pre-ordered Win7 Home Premium from Amazon. It only recognises 16GB of my 24GB of RAM and upgrading my license costs more than my discounted pre-order copy did in the first place. Luckily most of my memory intensive activities take place in OS X but nonetheless disappointed with myself for not having done my homework before purchasing, and with MS for imposing artificial limitations. Reply
  • cyabud - Tuesday, April 17, 2012 - link

    sorry should have replied to previous comment.. Reply
  • Conficio - Tuesday, April 17, 2012 - link

    In the days of the Windows App store, there is no reason to have more than one edition.

    Simply package the additional features into a product and sell those separately. Ideally have some features like bit locker, etc. available for small money ($5) purchase separately.

    That would also put away with the odd distinction of PCs/laptops being marketed for business or home use. And it allows a simple upgrade by feature needed.
    Reply
  • TEAMSWITCHER - Tuesday, April 17, 2012 - link

    The biggest problem with all these Windows 8 versions is that none of them are any good.....
    Windows 8 is a total piece of crap!

    I have found that Windows 8 fails to possess a single redeeming quality. It's a playskool user interface bolted on top of Windows 7 with multiple control panels, multiple task bars, with crappy multiple monitor and virtual machine support. There will be no decent Metro Apps at launch or even two years later that do not also exist on the iPad or Android. And there is no Windows Phone that can compete against the likes of the iPhone 4, 4S, or Galaxy II.

    We are witnessing nothing less than the decline and fall of the once mighty Microsoft. No....sorry....there isn't going to be a comeback this time. Windows 8, and Windows Phone, and Zune, are all proof of this undeniable fact....Microsoft is incapable of establishing a significant beachhead on today's technology landscape.

    Game Over
    Reply
  • Belard - Tuesday, April 17, 2012 - link

    Which version supports multiple languages? With Win7, you need Ultimate Edition to get that - handy for going to websites outside the USA or wherever.

    WMC isn't that big of a deal (Why not toss that into Ultimate?" I have a tuner card and its crappy software because the recordings I make are far easier to work-with. The resources and space required for WMC doesn't work for me.
    Reply
  • B3an - Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - link

    ALL versions of Win 8 support language packs. Theres a section now in the Control Panel where you can easily download any language you like. Reply
  • hamids9898 - Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - link

    Microsoft Seems to combine the best aspects of Android and iPhone into one piece of software. Now, if only they could get more developers on board and more flagship devices(Imagine something like the Galaxy Note running Windows Phone).
    http://hamidshaikh.com
    Reply
  • Penti - Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - link

    Windows 8 pro isn't directly equivalent to W7 Ultimate it is the equivalent to Windows 7 Professional, Windows 7 Ultimate is the retail equivalent to Windows 7 Enterprise thus it's the analog to Windows 8 Enterprise you get by Software Assurance. On the other hand Windows 8 Professional has the features of the former Ultimate/Enterprise variant. But still yet Windows 8 Enterprise will have features Windows 7 Ultimate or Windows 8 Professional doesn't have.

    "NOTE: As with previous versions of Windows, we will also have an edition of Windows 8 specifically for those enterprise customers with Software Assurance agreements. Windows 8 Enterprise includes all the features of Windows 8 Pro plus features for IT organization that enable PC management and deployment, advanced security, virtualization, new mobility scenarios, and much more. "

    All that means that you will get bitlocker and such in the ordinary business version without Software Assurance though. Other usage scenarios like Windows to Go and MDOP and VDA will require Enterprise. A better chart is actually Wikipedia here, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_8_editions#Co...
    Reply
  • p05esto - Sunday, April 22, 2012 - link

    As long as the pro version comes without the Metro crap that's all I care about. Let the home users deal with that nonsense and productivity limiting Metro BS.

    But who am I kidding, Win8 is on track to be a major failure, far worse than Vista. Vista was actually just fine, I like Vista SP2 better than Win7. There are a number of UI changes in Win7 that I dislike, and MS turned off the ability to customize them without resorting to complex registry hacks.
    Reply

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